People who play golf could live five years longer than those who don’t according to new research from Scotland.

Scientists in Edinburgh claimed the sport was helpful in preventing 40 different chronic diseases as well as offering improved mental health.

Researchers reviewed 5,000 studies into golf and found while it had health benefits for people of all ages, the gains were more pronounced among older players.

Golf was seen to aid balance and improve muscle strength but was also found likely to improve cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic health.

Dr. Andrew Murray, from the physical activity for health research center at Edinburgh University, said Wednesday that regular golf can help players beat official recommended levels for physical activity.

“Evidence suggests golfers live longer than non-golfers, enjoying improvements in cholesterol levels, body composition, wellness, self-esteem and self-worth,” he said in the report’s release.

The study claimed playing golf could also help those who suffer chronic diseases including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, colon and breast cancer and stroke.

 

According to the data, golfers typically burnt a minimum of 500 calories over 18 holes and those walking the course could trek up to eight miles.

Even golfers using a motorized cart were found to walk as much as four miles over a full round.

Three-time major golf title winner and ambassador for the Golf and Health project, for which the study was published, Padraig Harrington said in the report’s release that the finding was no surprise.

“I have seen how impactful golf can be on peoples’ wellbeing, now it is time to get the message out there,” he said.

The study was published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine and is part of the Golf and Health Project, which is led by the World Golf Foundation.

Article Source: http://www.cnbc.com/2016/10/06/playing-golf-can-add-five-years-to-your-life.html

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