Testosterone Deficiency in Men

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It is not normal to wake up feeling tired all of the time, nor is it written in stone that the body has to break down as you age. Do not let any person or doctor tell you that lack of energy, weight gain, decreased sex drive, and loss of muscle are a fact of life. They are not! Why is it that some people manage to stay looking young and fit throughout their lives when others show the signs of aging in their early years? Testosterone deficiency may be to blame.

If the only thing you have ever thought testosterone was good for was building muscles, or increasing a man’s love drive, you are very mistaken. These are only two of the many functions testosterone has in the body. While often referred to as the male sex hormone, testosterone is beneficial to everyone, male and female, alike.

Yes, you are getting older – we all are! That does not mean that you have to hang up your running shoes, put away your golf clubs, or cancel your gym membership. Once you understand the signs and symptoms of testosterone deficiency in men, you will be able to determine if the time has come to reach out to a specialist for help.

Testosterone Deficiency in Men

Here are the top warning signs that you might have testosterone deficiency:

  • You are always tired – in the morning when you wake up, in the afternoon after eating lunch, at night after work
  • You have gained weight – unless you have changed your eating habits and are now consuming mass quantities of food or alcohol beverages, abdominal weight gain is often a sign of hormonal imbalance
  • Your sex drive is missing from action – there is no action here when your libido has disappeared, and you find it takes a long time to feel even the slightest bit aroused
  • You can no longer achieve or maintain a powerful erection – erectile dysfunction is an immediate sign that something is wrong, and this can be as simple as fewer morning erections all the way to not being able to achieve an erection or orgasm
  • You are shrinking – loss of height has everything to do with decreased bone density – a serious issue when Low T is present
  • Your muscle size has decreased – testosterone helps to maintain muscle structure and strength, and if your workouts are no longer producing the desired effect, testosterone deficiency could be the problem
  • You are feeling depressed – depression, mood changes, anxiety, aggression, lack of motivation, decreased drive, frustration – these are all signs of testosterone deficiency
  • You forget things – memory failure, trouble with mental calculations, difficulty learning new things or committing new facts to memory, and poor focus are all associated with Low T
  • Hair loss – balding or thinning hair on the head, and excess hair growth on the body may all signal low testosterone
  • You have other health problems – if you have any of the following conditions you may also have testosterone deficiency: heart disease, diabetes, obesity, thyroid issues, osteoporosis, sleep apnea, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, or prostate problems

It is also not uncommon for a man with Low T to experience hot flashes and night sweats much the same way as a woman dealing with menopause. In fact, the term applied to Low T is andropause. The good news is that there is a way to improve these symptoms, you just need to know where to look and who to turn to for help.

Which Doctor Will Help to Reveal Testosterone Deficiency

The right doctor will help you determine if your symptoms are associated with testosterone deficiency. Blood testing will reveal if testosterone or any other hormone levels are below their normal range. Some of these hormones impact one another, causing a spiraling effect of deficiencies. The doctor that you want to contact at this time is a hormone replacement therapy specialist – HRT for short. These practitioners work with men and women over the age of thirty who are experiencing changes in their bodies due to hormonal imbalances.

An HRT specialist will not brush off your symptoms as signs of aging. These doctors know that testosterone deficiency can create havoc in the body, and lead to serious illness if not caught and treated. A proper diagnosis will provide patient-targeted treatment that will bring stellar results.

You do not need to live with the symptoms outlined above. There is help, and a hormone replacement specialist can provide what you need to feel like yourself again. Vitality, libido, passion, and excitement can and should be a part of your life. Testosterone therapy can make it happen.

Article Source: http://positivemed.com/2016/06/21/testosterone-deficiency/

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Western Diet Is Deadly For Prostate Cancer Patients

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According to a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research, prostate cancer survivors who consume a typical Western diet consisting of red meat, refined grains, processed foods, and high-fat dairy products may be at an increased risk of death from returning prostate cancer, as well as other causes.*

Researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health studied 926 men aged 40 to 84 who were diagnosed with prostate cancer that had not spread. Subjects answered questions about their diets five years after receiving a prostate cancer diagnosis and were monitored for approximately 10 years.

The men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who ate a diet that was more Westernized, were 2.5 times more likely to die of prostate cancer than those who ate the healthiest diet, and 1.5 times more likely to die of any cause.

“Our results suggest that the same dietary recommendations that are made to the general population primarily for the prevention of cardiovascular disease may also decrease the risk of dying from prostate cancer among men initially diagnosed with nonmetastatic disease (cancer that has not spread),” said study leader Dr. Jorge Chavarro.

Editor’s Note: The researchers say men who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer should choose a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and fiber with fewer dairy products and less red meat in order to improve their chances of survival.

Reference
* Cancer Prev Res. 2015 Jun 8.

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For seniors, sexual activity is linked to higher quality of life

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(Reuters Health) – Older adults who value sexual activity and engage in it have better social lives and psychological well-being, according to a small study in Scotland.

Older adults said “they miss and want to engage in sexual behaviors, whether that be a kiss to intercourse,” said study coauthor Taylor-Jane Flynn in an email. “For many, these behaviors remained an important element in their life.”

Flynn, a psychology PhD candidate at Glasgow Caledonian University, said the study was inspired by her work as a health care assistant for elderly people.

Although quality of life is a key consideration for older adults, sexuality is rarely studied, write Flynn and Alan Gow, an associate professor of psychology at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, in the journal Age and Ageing.

The researchers recruited 133 Scottish adults aged 65 and over by distributing questionnaires at local clubs, small businesses and older people’s groups.

About half the participants lived with a spouse or partner.

The questionnaire asked how often in the last six months participants had engaged in six sexual behaviors: touching/holding hands, embracing/hugging, kissing, mutual stroking, masturbation and intercourse.

Participants also rated how important those behaviors are to them, on a five-point scale ranging from “not at all important” to “very important.”

Additionally, the questionnaires assessed participants’ quality of life based on physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment.

Between 75 and 89 percent said they’d engaged in kissing, hugging and holding hands or touching. Men and women scored about the same for frequency and importance of sexual behaviors overall, and for quality of life.

Although people with frequent sexual activity also placed higher importance on it, the analysis found the two measures were associated with different aspects of quality of life.

Participants reporting more frequent sexual behavior rated their social relationships as higher quality, while people who found sexual activity to be important had higher scores for psychological quality of life.

Overall, however, seniors’ health status had the strongest impact on all aspects of quality of life.

John DeLamater, a sociology professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, said the fact that participants were recruited in community settings – which may attract more healthy and active older people – might affect the results.

“If they are generally healthier (which the results show to be associated with quality of life), they are probably more sexually active,” DeLamater said in an email.

For people who have valued sexuality throughout their lives, he noted, “continuing activity provides protection against a sense of aging and loss, and of continuity if the person is in a long-term relationship.” That may explain the links between sex and well-being found in the study, he said.

While the current study only looked at associations and cannot determine whether sexuality raises quality of life, Gow noted, he hopes that future research will focus more on this subject.

“What we hope is that our current findings encourage other researchers interested in the determinants of health and well-being in older adults to also consider sexual behaviors,” Gow said in an email.

The sexuality of older people should be considered and encouraged, DeLamater said. “We should encourage couples to spend time alone, provide arrangements in care facilities that enable sexual intimacy, provide sexual health information in medical settings.”

SOURCE: bit.ly/1CXCiLh Age and Ageing, online July 14, 2015.

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GRIP STRENGTH INDICATES DIABETES, HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

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 GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Researchers at the University of Florida have discovered a correlation between grip strength and diabetes and high blood pressure.
The study has been published online ahead of the print version in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Researchers measured the grip strength in normal-weight but high-fat-ratio adults with no history of cardiovascular disease and compared it to the grip strength of normal weight, normal BMI adults and with diagnosed diabetics. The subjects were then tested for A1c levels.

Findings show those who had undiagnosed diabetes measured with a lower grip strength than did individuals who were not diabetic or did not suffer from hypertension.

The results show the weakened grip condition was shown in subjects who had a body mass index within the normal range, but a high proportion of fat to lean muscle. Those percentages for men were more than 25 percent body fat, and for women 35 percent.

This is a subgroup less likely to be screened for hypertension or diabetes because they aren’t considered overweight or obese by BMI measures alone.

The researchers have concluded grip strength is lower in individuals with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and hypertension, and may be an indicator of these diseases in the undiagnosed.

http://www.ajpmonline.org/action/showMultipleAbstracts

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The Smart Way to Build a Fat-Loss Diet

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Core Medical Group

Article Written by Layne Norton and Sohee Lee 07/29/2015

Smart fat loss isn’t about seeing what you can survive. Crash dieting is a recipe for burnout, metabolic adaptation, and even fat gain. Layne Norton and Sohee Lee have a better way to earn results that last!

The wait is over! In our last article, “How Your Fat-Loss Diet Could Be Making You Fat,” we laid out the problems with the age-old “eat less and exercise more” mantra of fat loss. The more strictly you diet, and the more times you try to diet, the more efficient your metabolism becomes. This sounds encouraging at first, but it’s actually pretty grim. It means our bodies burn fewer calories for any given activity. This is great for survival purposes, but not for those of us who are intentionally attempting to shed body fat.

Further complicating things, your hunger level often increases during weight loss, satiety decreases, and the body desperately tries to shove you back up to your body-fat set point. This point, you may recall, is your body’s customary level of body fat. While you may think that hard training and strict dieting would inevitably push that point down, the popular yo-yo-diet model can actually push it up—meaning your body is trying to get fatter, not leaner.

When this happens—when, despite low calories, consistent workouts, and an overall diligent fitness program, forward progress of any kind is nowhere to be seen—the body is said to be “metabolically adapted.”

But not all hope is lost! As promised, here is how you can lower your body-fat set point, conquer metabolic adaptation, and find a fat-loss approach that lasts.

SOLUTION 1 START YOUR DIET ON THE RIGHT FOOT

Preventing metabolic adaptation starts with setting up an appropriate diet in the first place. This starts with a single idea that you need to take to heart: Diet on as many calories as you can get away with while still making progress.

Less is not better; sustainable progress is better. For everybody, that is going to be a different number, and if you’re accustomed to the “diet on as few calories as possible” approach, it will probably take you some time and struggles to find yours.

If you’ve been restricting food but not counting calories—this is more common than you might think—then our first recommendation is to perform an honest audit of your current intake. Spend the next three days tracking your daily macronutrients—that is, number of grams of protein, carbs, and fats—and establish a caloric baseline. You can use the old pen-and-paper method, or utilize any of the popular nutrition-tracking apps like MyMacros+ or MyFitnessPal. More importantly, don’t change yet. Do your best to be as honest as possible about what and how much you truly eat.

Once you’ve got that number, it’s time to tweak it. Most people will find that dieting on a bodyweight multiplier of 12 for total calories is a good starting point. In other words, take your body weight in pounds and multiply that by 12 to determine your total intake for the day. So if you weigh 150 pounds, then 1,800 calories per day will be your goal for fat loss. If you started far lower than bodyweight-times-12 in the past, that could be precisely what led you down the road to adaptation.

SOLUTION 2 ADD CALORIES BACK IN, BUT SLOWLY

So you’re systematically working your calories downward and seeing results. What next? Should you stay down there forever? Definitely not. Should you unhinge your jaw and Garfield your way through the nearest buffet? Not this time.

Consider approaching your diet like powerlifters approach peaking for a meet. If they know they can deadlift 700 for one rep, they don’t just hit that one rep over and over for every future workout. They touch it briefly and occasionally, then systematically work their way back down to a level where they can rack up plenty of quality reps. Truly strong people know that those easier reps are the ones that make the hard ones possible.

The dieting equivalent of this approach is the reverse diet. Reverse dieting is a method by which an individual methodically raises his or her calorie intake in order to bring a suppressed metabolism back up to speed, but without piling on excess body fat. This is ideal for those who would prefer not to have to hide in offseason sweatpants. Sohee discusses this further in her article, “4 Reasons Your Best Diet Might Be a Reverse Diet.”

Admittedly, there is currently no definitive research on reverse dieting. However, we’re confident that will change. Based on our observations from working with hundreds of clients—and ourselves—we’re convinced that raising calories slowly reduces fat accumulation in the long term.

HOW SLOW SHOULD I GO?

The rate at which you choose to increase your calories in a reverse diet is highly dependent on you—your history, your comfort level, your goals, and your recent experiences. This point can’t be emphasized enough.

You may be wondering, “Can’t I just go back up to maintenance calories when I’m done dieting?” Here’s the problem: If maintenance calories were truly maintenance, you would by definition not gain weight. But in reality, metabolism is highly variable. What may have been your maintenance calories one month ago might have since changed. For this reason, we don’t recommend being so quick to spike your intake.

When considering how slowly or quickly to increase your caloric intake, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How low did my caloric intake drop?
  • What was my bodyweight multiplier by the end of the diet?
  • How do I feel at this current intake?
  • How much potential body-fat gain am I comfortable with?

The lower your calories, the crummier you feel, and the more lenient you are with a little extra cushion, the more aggressive you may want to be with your calorie bumps. Otherwise, if you’d prefer to take it slow and be a little more cautious, take the more conservative route.

What does this mean in action? Some people are just fine bumping up their carbohydrate and fat intake by 2-10 percent per week, while others benefit from a more aggressive rate. If you were in a steep caloric deficit at the conclusion of the diet, tossing in 200-500 calories right off the bat may be necessary.

Keep in mind that a reverse diet isn’t supposed to feel “slightly less awful.” Do it right, and you should actually feelgood, both physically and mentally. Wouldn’t that be a nice change?

SOLUTION 3 FIND SMALL CHANGES TO BOOST ADHERENCE

Hopefully we’ve convinced you by now that the “on my diet/off my diet” dance is dooming your results. Adherence is how lasting results get achieved. And if you find that your dietary adherence has not been on point, consider shaking up your target macronutrient numbers.

For example, if you are consistently overshooting your carbohydrate intake because you find yourself feeling particularly depleted, why not simply bump up your target carbohydrate number? Rather than fight an uphill battle and try to force yourself to stick to a lower intake that leaves you feeling like dirt, look for ways to build confidence and momentum by increasing your adherence.

Remember, this isn’t supposed to be punishment! The more adherent you are, the more encouraged you will feel. And the more encouraged you feel, the more you’ll enjoy the journey. And at the end of the day, it’s crucial to fall in love with the process.

No matter how hard any of us might try, we can’t separate physiology from psychology. The two go hand in hand, and it would be irresponsible to ignore one side of the equation. Treat yourself right along the way, and you’ll earn better results and appreciate them more!

Article from: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-smart-way-to-build-a-fat-loss-diet.html

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