5 Common Low Testosterone Health Myths Debunked

Leave a comment

As men age, they face a very serious problem than a decline in testosterone levels. In fact, five percent of older males live with low testosterone levels.

Although many of us understand that low testosterone levels can result in changes in health, we may be believing the wrong information when it comes to low testosterone. These misconceptions around low testosterone could prevent you from getting the help you need to feel energized, strong, and essentially like yourself once again. So, instead of still believing the myths around low testosterone, uncover the truth that can help you finally deal with your low testosterone.

5 myths about low testosterone

Low testosterone is normal to aging: This myth is partially true in the sense that yes, testosterone levels do generally decline as you get older but this drop can also be abnormal. Testosterone decline does occur at a normal rate, but for some men, this rate is much greater. So, if you think it’s normal, you could be preventing yourself from getting treatment for this alarming decline in testosterone. When testosterone drops at an abnormal rate, that’s when a man’s overall health can become impacted. If you experience any of these symptoms, your testosterone levels have dropped below normal and you should speak to your doctor.

Low testosterone only affects older men: Because low testosterone is associated with aging, it is believed that only older males live with it. Low testosterone can affect any man at any age. In order to determine whether you have low testosterone, you should discuss any symptoms you experience with your doctor so they can piece them together along with any medical testing.

Testosterone replacement increases sperm count: This is a complete and utter myth, as increasing sperm count is something that testosterone replacement cannot do. In fact, testosterone replacement can actually lower sperm count. On the other hand, testosterone replacement therapy can help you feel like yourself again by reducing fatigue, increasing muscle, and lift mood and libido.

Testosterone replacement increases the risk of heart disease and cancer: Early studies have outlined the potential risk to the heart with testosterone replacement therapy, but as of late, findings suggest that the risk of heart disease may actually decrease. In regards to cancer, it is still quite controversial among those men with pre-existing prostate cancer. So far, though, the data does show that testosterone replacement therapy does not cause prostate cancer.

It’s safe to order testosterone replacements online: Testosterone medications are a controlled substance that can only be prescribed by your doctor. Using such therapies without the guidance of your doctor can put your health at risk. Taking in excess testosterone may actually hinder your body’s ability to produce testosterone naturally on its own. Furthermore, excess testosterone can increase the risk of stroke or blood clots. Before going online and purchasing testosterone replacement medications, speak to your doctor first to determine whether or not you have low testosterone.

 

Article Source: https://www.belmarrahealth.com/5-common-health-myths-debunked/

 

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Effects of taking tadalafil 5 mg once daily on erectile function and total testosterone levels in patients with metabolic syndrome.

Leave a comment

We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tadalafil 5 mg once-daily treatment on testosterone levels in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) accompanied by the metabolic syndrome. A total of 40 men with metabolic syndrome were evaluated for ED in this study. All the patients received 5 mg tadalafil once a day for 3 months. Erectile function was assessed using the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire. Serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone levels were also evaluated, and blood samples were taken between 08.00 and 10.00 in the fasting state. All participants have three or more criteria of metabolic syndrome. At the end of 3 months, mean testosterone values and IIEF scores showed an improvement from baseline values (from 3.6 ± 0.5 to 5.2 ± 0.3, from 11.3 ± 1.9 to 19 ± 0.8 respectively). After the treatment, serum LH levels were decreased (from 5.6 ± 0.6 to 4.6 ± 0.5). There was significantly difference in terms of baseline testosterone and luteinising hormone values and IIEF scores (p < .05). Based on our findings, we recommend tadalafil 5 mg once daily in those men with erectile dysfunction especially low testosterone levels accompanied by metabolic syndrome.

Article Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28295481

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

For seniors, sexual activity is linked to higher quality of life

Leave a comment

(Reuters Health) – Older adults who value sexual activity and engage in it have better social lives and psychological well-being, according to a small study in Scotland.

Older adults said “they miss and want to engage in sexual behaviors, whether that be a kiss to intercourse,” said study coauthor Taylor-Jane Flynn in an email. “For many, these behaviors remained an important element in their life.”

Flynn, a psychology PhD candidate at Glasgow Caledonian University, said the study was inspired by her work as a health care assistant for elderly people.

Although quality of life is a key consideration for older adults, sexuality is rarely studied, write Flynn and Alan Gow, an associate professor of psychology at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, in the journal Age and Ageing.

The researchers recruited 133 Scottish adults aged 65 and over by distributing questionnaires at local clubs, small businesses and older people’s groups.

About half the participants lived with a spouse or partner.

The questionnaire asked how often in the last six months participants had engaged in six sexual behaviors: touching/holding hands, embracing/hugging, kissing, mutual stroking, masturbation and intercourse.

Participants also rated how important those behaviors are to them, on a five-point scale ranging from “not at all important” to “very important.”

Additionally, the questionnaires assessed participants’ quality of life based on physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment.

Between 75 and 89 percent said they’d engaged in kissing, hugging and holding hands or touching. Men and women scored about the same for frequency and importance of sexual behaviors overall, and for quality of life.

Although people with frequent sexual activity also placed higher importance on it, the analysis found the two measures were associated with different aspects of quality of life.

Participants reporting more frequent sexual behavior rated their social relationships as higher quality, while people who found sexual activity to be important had higher scores for psychological quality of life.

Overall, however, seniors’ health status had the strongest impact on all aspects of quality of life.

John DeLamater, a sociology professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, said the fact that participants were recruited in community settings – which may attract more healthy and active older people – might affect the results.

“If they are generally healthier (which the results show to be associated with quality of life), they are probably more sexually active,” DeLamater said in an email.

For people who have valued sexuality throughout their lives, he noted, “continuing activity provides protection against a sense of aging and loss, and of continuity if the person is in a long-term relationship.” That may explain the links between sex and well-being found in the study, he said.

While the current study only looked at associations and cannot determine whether sexuality raises quality of life, Gow noted, he hopes that future research will focus more on this subject.

“What we hope is that our current findings encourage other researchers interested in the determinants of health and well-being in older adults to also consider sexual behaviors,” Gow said in an email.

The sexuality of older people should be considered and encouraged, DeLamater said. “We should encourage couples to spend time alone, provide arrangements in care facilities that enable sexual intimacy, provide sexual health information in medical settings.”

SOURCE: bit.ly/1CXCiLh Age and Ageing, online July 14, 2015.

Contact us for more information on how testosterone replacement therapy can help your sex life as well as our other ED therapies.

Boston Testosterone Partners
BTP/CORE New England
Men’s Health Centers
www.BostonTestosterone.com
781.269.5953

The Smart Way to Build a Fat-Loss Diet

Leave a comment

Boston Testosterone

Core Medical Group

Article Written by Layne Norton and Sohee Lee 07/29/2015

Smart fat loss isn’t about seeing what you can survive. Crash dieting is a recipe for burnout, metabolic adaptation, and even fat gain. Layne Norton and Sohee Lee have a better way to earn results that last!

The wait is over! In our last article, “How Your Fat-Loss Diet Could Be Making You Fat,” we laid out the problems with the age-old “eat less and exercise more” mantra of fat loss. The more strictly you diet, and the more times you try to diet, the more efficient your metabolism becomes. This sounds encouraging at first, but it’s actually pretty grim. It means our bodies burn fewer calories for any given activity. This is great for survival purposes, but not for those of us who are intentionally attempting to shed body fat.

Further complicating things, your hunger level often increases during weight loss, satiety decreases, and the body desperately tries to shove you back up to your body-fat set point. This point, you may recall, is your body’s customary level of body fat. While you may think that hard training and strict dieting would inevitably push that point down, the popular yo-yo-diet model can actually push it up—meaning your body is trying to get fatter, not leaner.

When this happens—when, despite low calories, consistent workouts, and an overall diligent fitness program, forward progress of any kind is nowhere to be seen—the body is said to be “metabolically adapted.”

But not all hope is lost! As promised, here is how you can lower your body-fat set point, conquer metabolic adaptation, and find a fat-loss approach that lasts.

SOLUTION 1 START YOUR DIET ON THE RIGHT FOOT

Preventing metabolic adaptation starts with setting up an appropriate diet in the first place. This starts with a single idea that you need to take to heart: Diet on as many calories as you can get away with while still making progress.

Less is not better; sustainable progress is better. For everybody, that is going to be a different number, and if you’re accustomed to the “diet on as few calories as possible” approach, it will probably take you some time and struggles to find yours.

If you’ve been restricting food but not counting calories—this is more common than you might think—then our first recommendation is to perform an honest audit of your current intake. Spend the next three days tracking your daily macronutrients—that is, number of grams of protein, carbs, and fats—and establish a caloric baseline. You can use the old pen-and-paper method, or utilize any of the popular nutrition-tracking apps like MyMacros+ or MyFitnessPal. More importantly, don’t change yet. Do your best to be as honest as possible about what and how much you truly eat.

Once you’ve got that number, it’s time to tweak it. Most people will find that dieting on a bodyweight multiplier of 12 for total calories is a good starting point. In other words, take your body weight in pounds and multiply that by 12 to determine your total intake for the day. So if you weigh 150 pounds, then 1,800 calories per day will be your goal for fat loss. If you started far lower than bodyweight-times-12 in the past, that could be precisely what led you down the road to adaptation.

SOLUTION 2 ADD CALORIES BACK IN, BUT SLOWLY

So you’re systematically working your calories downward and seeing results. What next? Should you stay down there forever? Definitely not. Should you unhinge your jaw and Garfield your way through the nearest buffet? Not this time.

Consider approaching your diet like powerlifters approach peaking for a meet. If they know they can deadlift 700 for one rep, they don’t just hit that one rep over and over for every future workout. They touch it briefly and occasionally, then systematically work their way back down to a level where they can rack up plenty of quality reps. Truly strong people know that those easier reps are the ones that make the hard ones possible.

The dieting equivalent of this approach is the reverse diet. Reverse dieting is a method by which an individual methodically raises his or her calorie intake in order to bring a suppressed metabolism back up to speed, but without piling on excess body fat. This is ideal for those who would prefer not to have to hide in offseason sweatpants. Sohee discusses this further in her article, “4 Reasons Your Best Diet Might Be a Reverse Diet.”

Admittedly, there is currently no definitive research on reverse dieting. However, we’re confident that will change. Based on our observations from working with hundreds of clients—and ourselves—we’re convinced that raising calories slowly reduces fat accumulation in the long term.

HOW SLOW SHOULD I GO?

The rate at which you choose to increase your calories in a reverse diet is highly dependent on you—your history, your comfort level, your goals, and your recent experiences. This point can’t be emphasized enough.

You may be wondering, “Can’t I just go back up to maintenance calories when I’m done dieting?” Here’s the problem: If maintenance calories were truly maintenance, you would by definition not gain weight. But in reality, metabolism is highly variable. What may have been your maintenance calories one month ago might have since changed. For this reason, we don’t recommend being so quick to spike your intake.

When considering how slowly or quickly to increase your caloric intake, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How low did my caloric intake drop?
  • What was my bodyweight multiplier by the end of the diet?
  • How do I feel at this current intake?
  • How much potential body-fat gain am I comfortable with?

The lower your calories, the crummier you feel, and the more lenient you are with a little extra cushion, the more aggressive you may want to be with your calorie bumps. Otherwise, if you’d prefer to take it slow and be a little more cautious, take the more conservative route.

What does this mean in action? Some people are just fine bumping up their carbohydrate and fat intake by 2-10 percent per week, while others benefit from a more aggressive rate. If you were in a steep caloric deficit at the conclusion of the diet, tossing in 200-500 calories right off the bat may be necessary.

Keep in mind that a reverse diet isn’t supposed to feel “slightly less awful.” Do it right, and you should actually feelgood, both physically and mentally. Wouldn’t that be a nice change?

SOLUTION 3 FIND SMALL CHANGES TO BOOST ADHERENCE

Hopefully we’ve convinced you by now that the “on my diet/off my diet” dance is dooming your results. Adherence is how lasting results get achieved. And if you find that your dietary adherence has not been on point, consider shaking up your target macronutrient numbers.

For example, if you are consistently overshooting your carbohydrate intake because you find yourself feeling particularly depleted, why not simply bump up your target carbohydrate number? Rather than fight an uphill battle and try to force yourself to stick to a lower intake that leaves you feeling like dirt, look for ways to build confidence and momentum by increasing your adherence.

Remember, this isn’t supposed to be punishment! The more adherent you are, the more encouraged you will feel. And the more encouraged you feel, the more you’ll enjoy the journey. And at the end of the day, it’s crucial to fall in love with the process.

No matter how hard any of us might try, we can’t separate physiology from psychology. The two go hand in hand, and it would be irresponsible to ignore one side of the equation. Treat yourself right along the way, and you’ll earn better results and appreciate them more!

Article from: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-smart-way-to-build-a-fat-loss-diet.html

Boston Testosterone Partners
BTP/CORE New England
Men’s Health Centers
920 Washington Street
Norwood, MA 02062
www.BostonTestosterone.com
781.269.5953