One hidden culprit behind weight gain: fruit juice

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Fruit juice isn’t doing any favors for your waistline, a new study reports.

People who drink a small glass of fruit juice daily can expect to steadily gain a bit of weight over the years, according to data from a long-term study of women’s health.

It’s about the same weight gain you’d expect if someone drank a similar amount of sugary soda every day, the study authors noted.

On the other hand, someone who increases consumption of whole fruit by one serving a day can expect to lose about a pound over three years, the researchers found.

A single 6-ounce daily serving of 100-percent fruit juice every day prompted an average weight gain of about half a pound over three years, said lead researcher Dr. Brandon Auerbach, a doctor at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle.

“The numbers might not seem like they’re that large, but this is in the context of an average American gaining about one pound every year,” Auerbach said. “In terms of weight gain, there’s a striking difference between fruit juice and whole fruit.”

The large load of sugar contained in fruit juice is contributing to the United States’ obesity epidemic, the researchers concluded.

A 6-ounce serving of pure fruit juice contains between 15 and 30 grams of sugar, and 60 to 120 calories, the study authors noted.

Whole fruit also contains sugar, but that sugar is stored within the pulp and fiber of the fruit, Auerbach said. Even high-pulp 100-percent orange juice is not a significant source of fiber.

Without that added fiber, the sugar in fruit juice hits your bloodstream much faster, inducing an insulin jolt that alters your metabolism, Auerbach said.

“Fruit juice does have the same vitamins and minerals as whole fruit does, but it has hardly any fiber,” he said. “The sugar in fruit juice gets absorbed very quickly, and we think that’s why it acts differently in the body.”

This new report relied on data from more than 49,000 post-menopausal American women who were part of the Women’s Health Initiative, a national health study, between 1993 and 1998.

On average, participants gained a little more than 3 pounds during three years of follow-up, the researchers reported.

After controlling for other factors in weight gain—for example, exercise, total calories consumed a day, education and income—the researchers found that women who frequently drank fruit juice were more likely to  .

Sugary fruit juice is a contributing factor to obesity, said Dr. Reshmi Srinath, but “it’s hard to pinpoint as a single culprit” responsible for weight gain.

“Generally, the association is with the pattern of healthy eating and healthy lifestyle,” said Srinath, an assistant professor of endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease with Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine in New York City.

“Those who eat more fresh fruit are generally having a healthier or more active lifestyle than those who are drinking juice,” Srinath added. She wasn’t involved in the study.

Srinath noted that, on average, women in the study drank less than one serving a day of pure fruit juice from the beginning, “which makes it even harder to find a significant difference, and makes it a more challenging study to interpret.”

Both Srinath and Auerbach agreed that moms should limit kids’ fruit juice, and instead pop a piece of whole fruit in their lunches.

“I would say to limit juice, especially through childhood, because those patterns can continue into adulthood,” Srinath said.

The study was published online recently in the journal Preventive Medicine.

More information: Brandon Auerbach, M.D., MPH, doctor, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle; Reshmi Srinath, M.D., assistant professor, endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City; Jan. 9, 2018, Preventive Medicine, online.

Article Source: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-hidden-culprit-weight-gain-fruit.html

February 14, 2018 by Dennis Thompson, Healthday Reporter

 

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7 Weight Loss Strategies That Actually Worked For Real People

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Losing weight is hard. Sometimes, the best form of inspiration is hearing what actually worked for other people with the same goal.

Recently, one Reddit user turned to the Internet to scope out this very question: “What are some weight loss diet and workout tips/tricks that actually work?”

The response wasn’t huge , but the thread was loaded with tips from people looking to dish out their own advice. The surprising part? Many of the tips they shared actually have a pretty strong backing in science. Here, seven weight loss strategies that helped them shed pounds—and why they might work for you, too.

“DRINK WATER INSTEAD OF SODA.”

It’s a simple swap, but an effective one. If you need to cut calories, nixing them in their empty, liquid form — like soda, booze, and sugary coffee drinks — will make a big impact.

Soda is loaded with sugar and potentially sketchy ingredients. For instance, one can of Coke contains 39 grams of added sugar (more than your daily recommended max of 36 grams) and 140 calories. Just one a day will save you nearly 1,000 extra calories a week.

Plus, drinking the sweet stuff might be upping your risk of some serious health conditions, too. One study published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that people who sip sugary drinks like soda have 10 percent more visceral fat — the fat you can’t see hiding deep within your body around your organs — than people who avoid the stuff. This type of fat has been linked to heart disease and diabetes.

 

“MEAL PREP WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE.”

This tip comes from the same user as above. If you have a hard time making healthy food choices in the moment, prepping meals ahead of time can save you from those impulsive not-so-great decisions.

When you have a hectic work schedule or kids to take care of, it’s a lot harder to turn down fast food or frozen meals you can heat up in 5 minutes. Taking a day or two out of your week to prep will ensure that your meals are full of muscle-building protein, filling fiber, and healthy carbs and fats — all essentials when you’re looking to drop pounds.

“INTERMITTENT FASTING. IT’S BEEN 8 WEEKS. I’VE LOST 18 POUNDS.”

More than one person in this Reddit thread gave a shout out to intermittent fasting, a weight-loss strategy that has surged in popularity. Basically, your eating is restricted during set times and you eat as normal — or even more than you would otherwise — during others.

In fact, intermittent fasting is just as effective for weight loss as daily calorie restriction, according to a study from the University of Illinois at Chicago. In this experiment, people who fasted ate 25 percent of their daily calorie needs every other day, known as “fast days.” On their “feast days” they ate 125 percent of their calorie needs. So if you typically eat 2,000 calories a day, you’d eat 500 calories one day, followed by 2,500 the next.

Any diet can work — as long as you’re consistent and able to stick with it. “The people who can benefit from this type of alternate-day fasting are those who would rather feel like they aren’t restricting food intake 3.5 days out of the week,” Men’s Health nutrition advisor, Alan Aragon, M.S. told us. That means you find it hard to stick to a diet all the time, and you’d like the flexibility that feast days can give you.

“ALL YOU REALLY NEED IS DECENT MOVEMENT EVERY DAY.”

“I lost 40 kg a few years ago,” one user wrote — that’s the equivalent of 88 pounds. “The only thing that really worked for me was to do cardio every single day, just 30 min of good cardio a day.”

The user added: “All you really need is decent movement every day. Jumping jacks are really effective for weight loss, they helped me most.”

Cardio can feel like a chore (unless you try one of these awesome indoor cardio workouts), but according to a study in BMC Public Health, overweight people who included both cardio and weight training into their 12-week exercise program lost more body fat than those who stuck to just one or the other.

“COOK ALL YOUR OWN FOOD.”

“Don’t eat anything that comes out of a bag, box, or restaurant,” one user pointed out in the thread.

It’s a good point: One study from the U.K. found that people who ate more than five home-cooked meals per week were 28 percent less likely to have an overweight body mass index (defined as anything above 25) and 24 percent less likely to have excess body fat than those who ate less than three home-cooked meals per week.

That’s because people who whip up their own meals tend to use healthier prep methods, eat a larger variety of foods (like fruits and vegetables), and eat less processed foods, which tend to be higher in added sugar and calories, the researchers note. What’s more, cooking at home motivates you to add other healthy habits into your daily routine, like exercising regularly.

“INCLUDE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES WITH EVERY MEAL.”

You’re probably not eating enough fruits and vegetables, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Only 12 percent of Americans eat at least 1.5 to 2 cups of fruit, while only 9 percent down a minimum of 2 to 3 cups of vegetables a day.

But filling your plate with fruits and vegetables is crucial if you want to eat more food while downing fewer calories. (Two cups of broccoli serves up only 109 calories. Compare that to just one cup of white pasta, which gets you around 200 or more.) Fruits and vegetables also contain lots of gut filling fiber, which will help keep your hunger at bay between meals.

Plus, packing in colorful produce can reduce your risk of chronic health issues, like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and even come cancers, says the CDC report.

Try this: Fill half your plate with fruits or vegetables, and split the other between quality carbs (like whole grains) and lean protein for a satisfying meal, Wesley Delbridge, R.D., spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, told Men’s Health recently.

“KETO HAS WORKED FOR ME. BUT MOSTLY BECAUSE IT HELPS ME REDUCE MY CALORIE INTAKE.”
The ketogenic diet is all anyone can talk about lately—but it’s not exactly new. The keto model is similar to the Atkins diet of the early 2000s, but focuses more heavily on carb restriction. When you go keto, 60 to 80 percent of your diet is composed of fat, 10 to 15 percent comes from protein, and less than 10 percent is made up of carbs.

Here’s the thing: Keto is extremely restrictive, which automatically means it won’t work for everyone. But if you can stick with it, you should go into in a ketogenic state, which will theoretically force your body to run on fat rather than glucose (a type of sugar found in carbs), helping you burn fat by default.

Plus, as the Reddit user noted, you’re forced to eat a limited number of foods, which means you have less of any opportunity to rely on unhealthy options. Plus, you can’t really eat carbs, so you will immediately eliminate refined carbs, like sugar cereals and packaged snacks, which can help you reduce your calories.

ALISA HRUSTIC

Article Source: https://www.menshealth.com/weight-loss/reddit-weight-loss-tips-that-work

 

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Benefits of Sermorelin w/GHRP2 in the First Six Months

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Sermorelin and GHRP2 both stimulate the patient’s own pituitary gland by binding to specific receptors that increase production and secretion of endogenous Human Growth Hormone (HGH).  GHRP2 also acts as an appetite suppressant allowing for increased weight loss.

First Month

Weight loss/Body fat reduction

Vivid dreams

Better, sounder sleep

Improved stamina

Optimistic attitude

 

Second Month 

Improved muscle tone

Increased strength

Improved skin tone

Improved nail growth

Better digestion

Weight loss/Body fat reduction

Improved vision

Enhanced sexual function

 

Third Month

Improved mental process

Enhanced productivity

Faster wound healing

Hair re-growth

Increased libido

Increased muscle size

Faster recovery from muscle soreness

Reduced PMS symptoms

Greater body flexibility

Reduced pain

 

Fourth Month

Heightened improvements with all of the above

At times improvements may seem to diminish or plateau

Rejuvenation is still a process. Benefits should resume with continued improvements

 

Fifth Month

Improved weight loss and reduction of inches

Improved skin texture and appearance

Skin thickening and greater elasticity

Reduction of skin wrinkles

Thickening of hair with a shiny, healthy appearance

Continuation of improved muscle tone

 

Sixth Month

Diminished cellulite

Improved resistance to colds, flu and other illnesses

Improved eyesight

Healing of old wounds

Disappearance of pain and soreness

Improved body contour

 

Contact us today for more information on Sermorelin/ghrps

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Do We Need to Give Up Alcohol to Lose Weight? Not Necessarily

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People trying to lose weight — or not gain weight — are frequently advised to “lay off the booze.” Although organizations like Weight Watchers offer ways to drink wisely within their plans, alcohol, with seven calories a gram and no compensating nutrients, is commonly thought to derail most efforts at weight control.

After the winter holidays, I often hear people blame alcohol for added pounds, not just from its caloric contribution but also because it can undermine self-control and stimulate the appetite and desire for fattening foods.

Yet you probably know people who routinely drink wine with dinner, or a cocktail before it, and never put on an unwanted pound. Given that moderate drinkers tend to live longer than teetotalers, I’d love a glass of wine or a beer with dinner if I could do so without gaining, so I looked into what science has to say about alcohol’s influence on weight.

Despite thousands of studies spanning decades, I discovered that alcohol remains one of the most controversial and confusing topics for people concerned about controlling their weight.

I plowed through more than two dozen research reports, many with conflicting findings on the relationship between alcohol and weight, and finally found a thorough review of the science that can help people determine whether drinking might be compatible with effective weight management.

The review, published in 2015 in Current Obesity Reports, was prepared by Gregory Traversy and Jean-Philippe Chaput of the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, Ontario.

The reviewers first examined so-called cross-sectional studies, studies that assessed links between alcohol intake and body mass index among large groups of people at a given moment in time. The most common finding was that, in men on average, drinking was “not associated” with weight, whereas among women, drinking either did not affect weight or was actually associated with a lower body weight than among nondrinkers.

Their summary of the findings: Most such studies showed that “frequent light to moderate alcohol intake” — at most two drinks a day for men, one for women — “does not seem to be associated with obesity risk.” However, binge drinking (consuming five or more drinks on an occasion) and heavy drinking (more than four drinks in a day for men, or more than three for women) were linked to an increased risk of obesity and an expanding waistline. And in a departure from most of the other findings, some of the research indicated that for adolescents and (alas) older adults, alcohol in any amount may “promote overweight and a higher body fat percentage.”

Prospective studies, which are generally considered to be more rigorous than cross-sectional studies and which follow groups of people over time, in this case from several months to 20 years, had varied results and produced “no clear picture” of the relationship between alcohol and weight. Several found either no relationship or a negative relationship, at least in women, while others found that men who drank tended to risk becoming obese, especially if they were beer drinkers.

The conclusion from the most recent such studies: While heavy drinkers risked gaining weight, “light to moderate alcohol intake is not associated with weight gain or changes in waist circumference.”

The studies Dr. Chaput ranked as “most reliable” and “providing the strongest evidence” were controlled experiments in which people were randomly assigned to consume given amounts of alcohol under monitored conditions. One such study found that drinking two glasses of red wine with dinner daily for six weeks did not result in weight gain or a greater percentage of body fat in 14 men, when compared with the same diet and exercise regimen without alcohol. A similar study among 20 overweight, sedentary women found no meaningful change in weight after 10 weeks of consuming a glass of wine five times a week.

However, the experimental studies were small and the “intervention periods” were short. Dr. Chaput noted that even a very small weight gain over the course of 10 weeks can add up to a lot of extra pounds in five years unless there is a compensating reduction in food intake or increase in physical activity.

Unlike protein, fats and carbohydrates, alcohol is a toxic substance that is not stored in the body. Alcohol calories are used for fuel, thus decreasing the body’s use of other sources of calories. That means people who drink must eat less or exercise more to maintain their weight.

Dr. Chaput said he is able to keep from gaining weight and body fat despite consuming “about 15 drinks a week” by eating a healthy diet, exercising daily and monitoring his weight regularly.

Big differences in drinking patterns between men and women influence the findings of alcohol’s effects on weight, he said. “Men are more likely to binge drink and to drink beer and spirits, whereas women mostly drink wine and are more likely than men to compensate for extra calories consumed as alcohol.”

Genetics are also a factor, Dr. Chaput said, suggesting that alcohol can be more of a problem among people genetically prone to excessive weight gain. “People who are overweight to begin with are more likely to gain weight if they increase their alcohol intake,” he said.

Furthermore, as I and countless others have found, alcohol has a “disinhibiting” effect and can stimulate people to eat more when food is readily available. “The extra calories taken in with alcohol are stored as fat,” he reminded drinkers.

Here’s the bottom line: Everyone is different. The studies cited above average the results among groups of people and thus gloss over individual differences. Even when two people start out weighing the same and eat, drink and exercise the same amount, adding alcohol to the mix can have different consequences.

The critical ingredient is self-monitoring: weighing yourself regularly, even daily, at the same time of day and under the same circumstances. If you’re a moderate drinker and find yourself gradually putting on weight, try cutting down on, or cutting out, alcohol for a few months to see if you lose, gain or stay the same.

Or, if you’re holding off on drinking but gradually gaining weight and have no medical or personal reason to abstain from alcohol, you might try having a glass of wine on most days to see if your weight stabilizes or even drops slightly over the coming months.

You might also consult a reliable source on the sometimes surprising differences in calorie content among similar alcoholic drinks. The Center for Science in the Public Interest recently published such a list, available at http://www.nutritionaction.com. Search for “Which alcoholic beverages have the most calories?” While you’ll find no difference in calories between white and red wines, depending on the brand, 12 ounces of beer can range from 55 to 320 calories.

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Article Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/13/well/do-we-need-to-give-up-alcohol-to-lose-weight-not-necessarily.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fwell&action=click&contentCollection=well&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=10&pgtype=sectionfront

 

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DHEA

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DHEA or Dehydroepiandrosterone, is the most abundant steroid found in the human blood stream. It is also one of the most reliable bio-markers of aging. DHEA is secreted by the adrenal glands, and also produced in the gonads (testes and ovaries), and the brain. It is sometimes called the “mother of all hormones” because it is the building block from which estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are produced, and is vital to health. Thousands of scientific article have been published on DHEA during the last 50 years, but a clear picture of its role in human health didn’t begin to merge until the 1990’s.

DHEA exhibits an amazingly wide diversity of effects!

DHEA has been reported to have anti-diabetic, anti-dementia, anti-obesity, anti-carcinogenic, anti-stress, immune-enhancing, anti-viral and anti-bacterial, anti-aging and anti-heart disease effects. In addition, research has shown that DHEA:

  • Is an anti-oxidant
  • Decreases body fat
  • Is a hormone regulator (it helps regulate the thyroid & pituitary glands, and enhances thymus gland function)
  • Decreases cholesterol
  • Stimulates the production of Human growth hormone
  • Boost immunity by stimulating killer cell activity (alleviation of symptoms inpatients with Lupus, Chronic fatigue syndrome, Rheumatoid arthritis etc)
  • Increases the sensitivity of cells to insulin
  • Assists in returning the body to a balanced state after a stress reaction
  • Improves cognitive function, bone formation and libido
  • Enhances mood by increasing the brain’s serotonin level

DHEA Levels Decrease With Age

Your DHEA  levels vary throughout your  life, and naturally decline as you get older.
We produce large amounts when we are young, and research shows that children’s brains require a significant amount of DHEA to grow and develop.  DHEA levels peak at age 25 and decline at a rate of about 2% a year, thereafter. It  isn’t until the mid forties, however, that we begin to the effects of lower DHEA levels. By age 80, most people’s  DHEA  blood  levels  are  only  about  15%  of  where  they  were  during  their 20’s. By the time we’re 90, DHEA levels are down to 5%

DHEA Deficiency

Symptoms  of  DHEA  deficiency  include:  poor  memory,  poor  resistance  to  noise,
anxiety, Lack of motivation, decreased  libido, decreased armpit and pubic hair, and
dry skin, eyes or hair.

Very  low  levels of DHEA have been  linked to Cardio-vascular disease  in men, some
cancers, trauma, and stress; Research has shown has shown that Alzheimer patients
have exhibited low DHEA levels, when compared to their healthy counterparts.
Other Factors that contribute to decreased DHEA levels:

  • Chronic disease
  • Excessive sugar intake
  • Nicotine
  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Nutritional imbalances
  • A vegetarian diet low in cholesterol and healthy fats

Recommended Doses of DHEA

For men:  Typical  safe  dose  of  Plain  DHEA  range  from  25-100mg  daily.  DHEA  is  a
available in a Sublingual tablet, capsule, Topical cream or injectable forms. Dosages
depend on age, symptoms and blood levels.

For Women: In order to avoid potential side effects which  include Acne, Facial hair
growth,  deeper  voice,  thinning  hair  and  genital  virilization,  a  maximum  of  25mg
daily is recommended in divided dosage. Effective dose range from 5mg-25mg.

What Is 7-Keto DHEA?

Keto DHEA, also known as 7-Keto, is a metabolite of the adrenal hormone DHEA. But
because It doesn’t break down into the sex hormones Estrogen or Testosterone, is it
considered non-hormonal. Many of  the potential side effects associated with DHEA
are avoided: such as Acne, facial hair growth in women and hair loss.

Functions of 7-Keto DHEA include:

  • Increases muscle mass
  • Decreases stress
  • Increases metabolic rate by increase levels of Free T3
  • Accelerate weight loss in healthy adult

Weight Loss

7-Keto  DHEA  has  clinically  been  shown  to  increase metabolism  and  contribute  to healthy weight loss. One way  that 7-Keto contributes to weight loss is by increasing the activity of thermogenic enzymes responsible for fatty acid  oxidation. 7-Keto has been shown to accelerate fat loss threefold without any stimulant effect on the body.

It takes between 200mg-400mg in divided dosages a day, accompanied by balanced diet (calorie  restriction)  and  exercise  in  order  to  loose  significant  fat  and  enhance muscle mass. For women, 100mg twice/day of 7-Keto DHEA  is usually enough. Very  low  levels of DHEA have been  linked to Cardio-vascular disease  in men, some cancers, trauma, and stress; Research has shown has shown that Alzheimer patients have exhibited low DHEA levels, when compared to their healthy counterparts.

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The type, not just the amount, of sugar consumption matters in risk of health problems

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The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Female rats were given a liquid solution of either glucose (a form of sugar found naturally in the body after carbohydrates are broken down) or fructose (sugar found in fruit and fruit juices) in addition to their normal diet of solid food. The rats received the sweetened solutions for eight weeks, roughly equivalent to a person eating large amounts of sugar for six years. The sugar-fed rats were compared with a control group that received plain drinking water in addition to their food supply.

Researchers found that although both sugar-fed groups consumed more calories than the control group, the total calorie intake of the glucose-fed rats was higher than the rats that were given fructose. Another surprising observation was that “despite this difference, only the fructose group exhibited a significant increase in final body weight,” wrote the research team.

In addition to higher weight gain, the fructose group showed more markers of vascular disease and liver damage than the glucose group. These included high triglycerides, increased liver weight, decreased fat burning in the liver (a factor that can contribute to fatty liver) and impaired relaxation of the aorta, which can affect blood pressure.

These findings suggest that an increase in the amount of calories consumed due to sweeteners is not the only factor involved in long-term health risks. The type of sugar may also play a role in increasing risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

More information: Gemma Sangüesa et al. TYPE OF SUPPLEMENTED SIMPLE SUGAR, NOT MERELY CALORIE INTAKE, DETERMINES ADVERSE EFFECTS ON METABOLISM AND AORTIC FUNCTION IN FEMALE RATS, American Journal of Physiology – Heart and Circulatory Physiology (2016). DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00339.2016

Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-01-amount-sugar-consumption-health-problems.html#jCp

Article Source: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-01-amount-sugar-consumption-health-problems.html

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Post-Meal Coffee Changes Metabolic Markers

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When enjoyed after a meal, coffee may increase levels of an appetite-regulating hormone, improve blood sugar levels, and boost endothelial function.

Coffee contains a number of compounds – most notably, polyphenols that numerous previous studies suggest exert beneficial effects for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.  Japanese researchers enrolled 19 healthy men in a study in which each subject was given a test meal with a polyphenol-rich coffee drink (365 mg of chlorogenic acids), or placebo drink; subjects later crossed over to the other intervention.  Testing 3 hours after the meal revealed that the coffee polyphenol beverage lowered blood glucose significantly, and increased flow mediated dilation (FMD) – a marker of blood flow and vascular health.  As well, the coffee polyphenol beverage increased post-meal levels of an appetite-regulating hormone (GLP1).  The study authors write that: “these results suggest that coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function, which is associated with increased GLP-1 secretion and decreased oxidative stress in healthy humans.”

Article Source: http://www.worldhealth.net/news/post-meal-coffee-changes-metabolic-markers/

 

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