Is DMAE Missing from Your Anti-Aging Regimen?

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Dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE or deanol), is a compound that occurs in anchovies, salmon and sardines, and is believed to increase brain levels of the neurohormone acetylcholine, which facilitates the transmission of impulses between neurons (brain cells).

DMAE has been investigated as a treatment for several conditions since the 1950s, including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the movement disorder known as tardive dyskinesia.

DMAE May Benefit Hyperactivity and Movement Disorders

A double-blind study involving 74 children with learning and behavior disorders including hyperactivity found improvement with DMAE, although the researchers were uncertain with regard to its mechanism of action.1

Research in rat cerebral cortex neurons exposed to acetylcholine or DMAE revealed similar excitatory responses in association with either compound, adding evidence to a cholinergic property for DMAE.2 In another study, rats that received choline or DMAE showed an increase in brain choline and acetylcholine.3 “This finding suggests that the concentration of free choline in the brain is below that which is necessary for a maximal rate of synthesis of acetylcholine, and raises the possibility that the availability of choline in brain may regulate the rate of synthesis of acetylcholine,” authors Dean R. Haubrich and colleagues note.

Tardive dyskinesia is a disorder characterized by involuntary, repetitive movement that is often the result of long term or high dose usage of antipsychotic pharmaceutical therapy. Early research involving individuals affected by this condition found therapeutic benefit for DMAE in some, but not all subjects.4

Failure of some patients to achieve the dramatic response observed in other patients involved in studies that evaluated DMAE has been suggested to be due to dosage inadequacies or other factors.5 In a study that compared the effects of one gram deanol (DMAE), two grams deanol, or a placebo daily for thirty days; only patients in the group that received the higher dose of DMAE exhibited a significant reduction in movement.6

The Anti-Aging Effects of DMAE

DMAE has been suggested to have an anti-aging effect. In 1973, researcher Richard Hochschild reported the finding of an extension of average lifespan of 27.3% and maximum lifespan of 39.7% in mice given a compound that immediately breaks down into DMAE and p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, leading him to conclude that the effects observed in the study may be attributable to these byproducts.7

Research published in Mechanisms of Ageing and Development in 1980 reported the ability of DMAE to diminish cross-linking of proteins, a process that causes damage to cellular membranes in tissues, thereby contributing to aging.8 Author I. Nagy later confirmed the ability of DMAE to scavenge hydroxyl radicals, supporting its anti-aging properties.9

In mice, DMAE alone or in combination with one or two cholinergic drugs improved retention test performance.10 Lifelong administration of DMAE to mice has resulted in a reduction in the aging-associated pigment lipofuscin in the liver in comparison with untreated animals.11

In dementia patients, DMAE given three times daily for four weeks lessened behavioral changes, including those attributed to depression, anxiety, irritability and lack of initiative, in 10 out of 14 subjects.12

DMAE and Aging Skin

Interestingly, DMAE has been shown to benefit the appearance of the skin when applied topically. The compound appears to increase skin firmness.13 Whether these effects are long-lasting remains to be seen, however, one study found that several benefits obtained during a 16-week course of daily topical DMAE did not regress during a subsequent two-week period in which DMAE was not applied.14

According to author R. Grossman, improvements were observed in coarse wrinkles, under-eye circles, nasolabial folds and sagging skin on the neck. These visually assessed improvements have been confirmed by quantitative measures of skin strength. In another experiment, which involved mice and human volunteers, DMAE increased dermal thickness and collagen fiber thickness.15

DMAE is less of a household word these days, but worth keeping in mind. Because of its stimulating potential, low doses are suggested for those who choose to use it.

References:

  1. Lewis JA et al. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1975 May;17(5):534-40.
  2. Kostopoulos GK et al. Psychopharmacol Commun. 1975;1(3):339-47.
  3. Haubrich DR et al. Life Sci. 1975 Sep 15;17(6):975-80.
  4. Bockenheimer S et al. Arch Psychiatr Nervenkr (1970). 1976 Sep 17;222(1):69-75.
  5. Stafford JR et al. Dis Nerv Syst. 1977 Dec;38(12 Pt 2):3-6.
  6. George J et al. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1981 Mar;15(1):68-71.
  7. Hochschild R. Exp Gerontol. 1973 Aug;8(4):185-91.
  8. Nagy I et al. Mech Ageing Dev. 1980 Sep-Oct;14(1-2):245-51.
  9. Nagy I et al. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 1984 Dec;3(4):297-310.
  10. Flood JF et al. Neurobiol Aging. 1983 Spring;4(1):37-43.
  11. Stenbäck F et al. Mech Ageing Dev. 1988 Feb;42(2):129-38.
  12. Ferris SH et al. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1977 Jun;25(6):241-4.
  13. Uhoda I et al. Skin Res Technol. 2002 Aug;8(3):164-7.
  14. Grossman R. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2005;6(1):39-47.
  15. Tadini KA et al. Pharmazie. 2009 Dec;64(12):818-22.

Article Source:http://blog.lifeextension.com/2016/11/is-dmae-missing-from-your-anti-aging.html

 

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Reducing Age-Related Decline by Boosting Glutathione

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A research team at Oregon State University has determined that glutathione may help ward off toxins that are an underlying cause of aging. Glutathione levels decline with age, which opens the door for a wide range of age-related health issues. A recent study, published in the journal Redox Biology, also highlighted a compound – N-acetyl-cysteine, or NAC – which is currently in use in high doses for the purpose of medical detoxification emergencies. The researchers stated that at much lower levels, NAC may help maintain glutathione levels and prevent the usual metabolic decline that occurs with aging. Looking at it from this angle, research offers not only some profound insights into why animals health declines with age, but also reveals a specific compound that could help prevent some of the toxic processes involved.

The researchers believe that the decline of these detoxification pathways is incidentally linked to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, which are some of the primary causes of human mortality. Tory Hagen, lead author on the research and the Helen P. Rumbel Professor for Health Aging Research in the Linus Pauling Institute at OSU, states that the importance of glutathione as a strong antioxidant has been known for some time. He goes on to say “What this study pointed out was the way that cells from younger animals are far more resistant to stress than those from older animals,” Hagen is also a professor of biochemistry at the OSU College of Science. “In young animal cells, stress doesn’t cause such a rapid loss of glutathione. The cells from older animals, on the other hand, were quickly depleted of glutathione and died twice as fast when subjected to stress. “But pretreatment with NAC increased glutathione levels in the older cells and largely helped offset that level of cell death.”

Hagen said that glutathione is such a vital antioxidant that its existence seems to date back as far as oxygen-dependent, or aerobic life itself. Or, in other words, about 1.5 billion years. Glutathione is a principal compound that detoxifies environmental stresses, heavy metals, air pollutants, pharmaceuticals and various other toxins.

In the current study, the researchers attempted to pinpoint the resistance to toxins of young cells, as compared to older cells. They utilized a toxic compound called menadione to stress the cells. As a result of that stress, the younger cells lost significantly less glutathione than older cells did. The levels of glutathione in the young rat cells never dipped to lower than 35 percent of its initial level. However, the older rat cells glutathione levels fell to 10 percent of their original level.

The researchers state that NAC iboosts the metabolic function of glutathione as well as increasing its rate of synthesis. It is currently used in emergency medicine to assist patients in a toxic crisis, for example ingestion of poisonous levels of heavy metals. It is known to be a very safe compound to utilize even at particularly high levels. Furthermore, the scientists believe that it may have significant value at much lower doses for maintaining glutathione levels and improving health. “I’m optimistic there could be a role for this compound in preventing the increased toxicity we face with aging, as our abilities to deal with toxins decline,” Hagen stated. “We might be able to improve the metabolic resilience that we’re naturally losing with age.”

Hagen believes that there appears to be a wide range of detoxification potential offered by glutathione. High levels of it in conjunction with NAC may help reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapies, certain prescription drugs, and treat other health problems. The researchers concluded that “Using NAC as a prophylactic, instead of an intervention, may allow glutathione levels to be maintained for detoxification in older adults,”

Article Source: http://www.worldhealth.net/news/reducing-age-related-decline/

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Hormone That Reverses Cell Aging in Humans Identified

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The human body has hidden secrets scientists are just now discovering. Scientists have known that the human body can heal itself naturally, and now they realize that it can ultimately regenerate dying cells. During a clinical trial, the discovery of a new hormone found in males has shown some promising results in countering the effects of aging. The discovery does not promise a prolonged life-span, but rather a way to help people lead healthier lifestyles.

In later experiments, researchers from the United States and Brazil used a synthetic male hormone, known as a danazol steroid, to arouse the production levels of telomerase, a well- known enzyme. Telomerase is best known for keeping cells young by preventing DNA telomerase cells from shrinking. The process stops the generation of telomerase, and attaches itself to the end of the body’s chromosome.

One of the biggest challenges associated with aging is the rapid decrease of telomerase DNA protection. Every time a cell in the body splits or multiplies, the telomeres increase in length. Eventually, the cell will fail to reproduce itself any longer, and die or naturally age. When telomerase is present, it keeps the telomeres in place, and even aids in the process of cell division.

Finding Can Combat the Negative Impact of Telomerase Degeneration

In past studies, evidence presented shows how aging cells can be stopped by increasing telomerase, which is produced naturally by human cells, and is continually multiplying. This process is similar to blood-forming cells. A lack of telomerase can increase the risk of cancer and have a negative impact on the internal organs. Most recent studies show that prescription steroids are responsible for generating telomerase on demand, confirming what scientists had previously witnessed in the laboratory.

Armed with this relatively new knowledge, new medical treatments can be produced for serious diseases like aplastic anemia, which causes premature aging of the bone marrow stem cells. In the study danazol was distributed over a two-year period, to 27 patients with aplastic anemia, which was caused by the mutation of telomerase genes. The discovery can also produce treatment for scarred lungs, and pulmonary fibrosis.

Over a two-year period, a person will lose from 100 to 120 telomere base pairs (DNA building blocks) each year. However, people with telomerase deficiencies could lose from 200 to 600 base pairs over the same course of time. When participants were given the new treatment, the length of telomere cells stopped shrinking, and increased by an average of 386 base pairs. Hemoglobin mass increased, which meant patients no longer needed to rely on blood transfusions.

New Discovery Opens the Door for Future Research

While scientists are optimistic at the possible new treatments and medical breakthroughs, every success comes with a price. The use of sex hormones has notable side effects, such as digestive system problems, fatigue, and mood swings.

Knowing how to overcome one of life’s biological barriers, such as aging, is a valuable and major accomplishment for future research projects. As of now, the elixir to the fountain of youth, or staying young forever is out of reach. At this moment, the possibilities of new medical miracles in science are looking more promising than ever.

Article Source: http://www.worldhealth.net/news/new-hormone-can-regenerate-aging-cells-found-human/

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Don’t Wait Until You’re Older to Fight Getting Old

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Research shows aging can start surprisingly early—but there are ways to counteract declines in hearing, sight and bone and muscle mass

You might not qualify for any senior-citizen discounts yet. But aging starts sooner than you might expect.

Age-related hearing starts going downhill at 25, though it isn’t noticeable until decades later. We start losing bone mass as early as our 30s. And a recent study by Duke University researchers found that some types of physical decline—particularly lower-body strength and balance—often begin in the 50s.

“Every function of the human body declines 5% every 10 years,” says Michael Roizen,chairman of the Wellness Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. “That’s brain function, heart function, liver function. The difference is when you sense it and when it hits the critical level where it decreases functioning for you.”

The physical performance study, published in July in the Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, looked at 775 people from their 30s to over 90. The participants took five functional tests measuring strength, balance and endurance, including standing on one leg for a minute and rising from a chair repeatedly for 30 seconds.

In general, younger people performed better than older people and men better than women, as expected, says Miriam Morey, a professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine and senior author of the study. But researchers were surprised to find a marked decline in performance on the balance and chair test starting when participants were in their 50s.

“We should consider measuring these things over the full lifespan and not assume that these are problems of the aged, but rather a problem of aging,” Dr. Morey says.

This Is 40

When it comes to cognitive decline, there is a gradual loss of different functions. Speed of processing and working memory peak in the 20s and gradually start declining.

Learning new information after 40 can be harder, says Kathy Wild, an associate professor of neurology and psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon. Tasks that require concentration should be done with minimal interruptions or distractions, she says. “Do just one thing until you’re done with it,” she says. “It’s really structuring the environment to minimize distractions.”

The Eyes Don’t Have It

By the 40s, even people without glasses may have trouble focusing on objects that are very close, like text in a book, says Rebecca Taylor, clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and an ophthalmologist in Nashville, Tenn. It’s called presbyopia, and it’s the gradual loss of the eyes’ ability to focus actively on close objects.

For women in particular, dry eye becomes a common problem in the late 40s and early 50s, she says. Glaucoma and the development of cataracts are common problems in the 50s and 60s. By 75, about 70% of people will have developed a cataract, which causes a loss of ability to see at night but is easily treated with surgery.

The most serious vision problem is age-related macular degeneration. There is no cure for it, so prevention, beginning with a healthy diet, is key, Dr. Taylor says. She recommends diets high in vitamin C and vitamin E, zinc and copper, and lutein and zeaxanthin, found in leafy greens. Not smoking and wearing sunglasses with 100% UV protection are musts.

Did You Hear a Whistle?

High-pitched sounds are first to go. Our hearing is best between ages 18 and 25, says Ian Windmill, clinical director of audiology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. “It actually starts going down after that, but it’s so slow, so you don’t notice it for many years.”

The medical term for age-related hearing loss is presbycusis.

It usually becomes noticeable around age 50, he says.

There’s no way to restore such hearing loss, since it’s caused by both genetics and environmental factors, such as exposure to loud noises and chemicals, as well as your diet and medications.

Avoiding loud noises is impossible, but you can reduce their impact by taking measures such as wearing hearing protection when mowing the lawn or attending a rock concert, he says.

Core Concerns

Lower-body, core and postural strength are especially critical, says Katherine S. Hall, an assistant professor of medicine at Duke and first author of the study. “The earlier you start an exercise program the better.”

One of the hallmarks of aging is sarcopenia, which is the progressive loss of skeletal muscle that starts in the 30s, says Nathan LeBrasseur, associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

It becomes noticeable in the late 30s and early 40s, when losing weight often becomes more difficult, he says.

The loss of muscle mass happens at a rate of about 10% per decade, he says, while muscle strength and power—the ability to generate force over time—declines even more dramatically. Dr. LeBrasseur says this may go beyond muscle loss, and be related to impaired brain signals and changes to the circulatory system.

Kyle Jeray, vice chairman of academics in the department of orthopaedic surgery at Greenville Health System in South Carolina, says bone mass peaks at about age 30.

Men and women have equal rates of loss between 30 and 50. Then at menopause, women experience a rapid increase in bone loss for as long as 10 years before it normalizes. Bone loss is compounded by muscle loss, leading to problems with balance and gait.

“When you lose core strength, you start having more and more trouble with balance,” says Dr. Jeray, who is chairman of the American Orthopaedic Association’s Own the Bone committee, which works to prevent osteoporosis-related fragility fractures. “Going up and down stairs without holding a handrail, for example, becomes harder.”

The combination of muscle and bone loss becomes a real problem when people reach their 60s and 70s, which is why maintaining muscle strength when in your 40s and 50s is so important, he says.

Written By:  SUMATHI REDDY Article Source: http://www.wsj.com/articles/dont-wait-until-youre-older-to-fight-getting-old-1472488840

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Declining testosterone levels in men not part of normal aging, study finds

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A new study finds that a drop in testosterone levels over time is more likely to result from a man’s behavioral and health changes than by aging. The study results will be presented Monday at The Endocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

“Declining testosterone levels are not an inevitable part of the aging process, as many people think,” said study co-author Gary Wittert, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Adelaide in Adelaide, Australia. “Testosterone changes are largely explained by smoking behavior and changes in health status, particularly obesity and depression.”

Many older men have low levels of the sex hormone testosterone, but the cause is not known. Few population-based studies have tracked changes in testosterone levels among the same men over time, as their study did, Wittert said.

In this study, supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the authors analyzed testosterone measurements in more than 1,500 men who had measurements taken at two clinic visits five years apart. All blood testosterone samples underwent testing at the same time for each time point, according to Wittert.

After the researchers excluded from the analysis any men who had abnormal lab values or who were taking medications or had medical conditions known to affect hormones, they included 1,382 men in the data analysis. Men ranged in age from 35 to 80 years, with an average age of 54.

On average, testosterone levels did not decline significantly over five years; rather, they decreased less than 1 percent each year, the authors reported. However, when the investigators analyzed the data by subgroups, they found that certain factors were linked to lower testosterone levels at five years than at the beginning of the study.

“Men who had declines in testosterone were more likely to be those who became obese, had stopped smoking or were depressed at either clinic visit,” Wittert said. “While stopping smoking may be a cause of a slight decrease in testosterone, the benefit of quitting smoking is huge.”

Past research has linked depression and low testosterone. This hormone is important for many bodily functions, including maintaining a healthy body composition, fertility and sex drive. “It is critical that doctors understand that declining testosterone levels are not a natural part of aging and that they are most likely due to health-related behaviors or health status itself,” he said.

Unmarried men in the study had greater testosterone reductions than did married men. Wittert attributed this finding to past research showing that married men tend to be healthier and happier than unmarried men. “Also, regular sexual activity tends to increase testosterone,” he explained.

Article Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-06/tes-dtl062212.php

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Active Seniors Have Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes

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A ten-year study of older Americans shows that those who are physically active have a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes. The study included more than 4,000 men and women whose average age at the beginning of the study was 73 years old.

Walking Reduces the Risk of Heart Attacks and Strokes:

Those who walked faster than three miles an hour were only half as likely to develop heart disease or a stroke as those who ambled slower than two miles an hour. The researchers found that those walking seven blocks a day or so cut their risk of stroke or cardiovascular disease by around 50 percent compared to people who walked five blocks or fewer a week.

Having Fun Can Help the Heart:

Active leisure activities such as yard work, swimming, biking or hiking were also protective against heart attacks and strokes. The lead author noted,

“Our study of older Americans shows that, even late in life, moderate physical activity such as walking is linked to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease.”

One of the highlights of the study is that even people who were 75 or older at the beginning of it (and thus 85 or above by the time it ended) got protection from heart attacks and strokes by being active. Just the amount of walking needed to cover seven blocks in Boston, where the study took place, was helpful.

Circulation, online Nov. 4, 2015

What Can You Do?

The take-home message here is Move! It’s never too late to start. To get the most benefit from your activity, pick something you like to do (dancing? yoga? walking the dog? all are good) so you will do it regularly and stick with it. Getting a buddy or a group of friends to join in is even better, as most people don’t want to let the gang down and so will show up for the walk. That way, all your friends can also enjoy the benefits that you will gain against heart attacks and strokes.

A Holiday Gift Suggestion:

Early this year, researchers found that devices that track activity or count steps can be helpful in giving walkers motivation or feedback to keep going. While you don’t need a fancy gadget to do this, you might know someone who would appreciate an electronic device or even an ordinary pedometer as a gift this year. It might help ward off heart attacks and strokes.

Source: http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2015/11/26/active-seniors-have-fewer-heart-attacks-and-strokes/

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10 Reasons Why Life Gets Better As You Grow Up (Not the Opposite Way Around)

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We don’t age by years, we age by experience. Yet, we’re largely under the impression that life gets worse as it goes on — the “golden days” we’ve attributed to being our budding adolescence, yet generally speaking, that is the most difficult and uncertain time of life, both biologically and socially.

Research shows that we get better as we age, we become happier as life progresses, and that the loss of “childlike wonder,” or, the magic that makes youth what we want to hold onto, is not a natural occurrence, it’s a learned behavior. That is to say – we can just as easily reclaim it.

Happiness increases as we age because we develop and master the cognitive functions required to sustain happiness, we settle into a sense of who we are, we accomplish a few things, and we evolve past our erratic, emotional adolescent selves. Essentially: life doesn’t get better, we become better equipped to deal with it. Here, all the reasons why you have the rest of your life to look forward to, whether you believe it or not:

1. As you get older, you build the cognitive functions that happiness requires: gratitude, objectivity, problem-solving.

The more you see of the world, and the more you experience yourself within it, you learn that there’s a lot to be grateful for, things exist separate from our perception of them and most issues are resolvable if only you decide you’re committed to resolving them.

2. Science says you’re generally more content after you have a few major life achievements under your belt.

Some research argues that 37 is the happiest age: we’ve done enough that we feel accomplished, settled and as though our identities are validated, but not so much that we don’t have anything to look forward to.

3. As you age your attitude shifts from “What can I do” to “what can I enjoy.”

Your objective is less to prove or establish yourself, and more to enjoy your life and be present within it fully.

4. If life becomes more difficult as time goes on, it indicates you’re not learning, evolving or adapting in some way.

There is not actually a point in time when life gets “easier,” we just become better equipped to deal with things that we didn’t know how to deal with prior. Likewise, people who do not develop those tools do find that life gets more difficult as it goes on, not because circumstances are more challenging necessarily, but because from their perspective, they are unable to handle them well.

5. You’re most emotionally erratic as a young adult.

The brain circuit that processes fear, the amygdala, develops ahead of the prefrontal cortex, which is the center for reasoning and executive control. This means that adolescents have brains wired for an enhanced perception of fear, and underdeveloped ability to calm or reason with themselves.

6. We are taught by experience that nothing external we assume will bring us happiness actually does.

Very often, the goals we choose to pursue as adolescents have some deeper link or connection to believing we’ll be more loved, accepted or admired for having achieved something “great.” It’s only after we have one or two of those things under our belts that we realize we’re not fulfilled in the way we hoped to be. As we age, we learn to separate our desire for emotional fulfillment from our false ideas of how we could achieve it.

7. Bonds you build with people over years cohere into emotional “safety nets.”

This is to say that as time goes on, friendships deepen and relationships evolve, you begin to choose your own family and bond with them in more and more intimate ways. This, of course, translates to us as a feeling of “safety,” and genuine inclusiveness, which is a primitive desire as well as a key component of happiness.

8. You know how to get through things — because you’ve done it before.

You know you’ll survive the death of a loved one because you had to teach yourself how to mourn and move on a few times before. You know you’ll get through a financially sparse month or a difficult breakup, because you’ve done it before. Your past challenges gave you the tools to deal with your current, and present ones.

9.You move from assuming that your time here is a guarantee to seeing it as a gift and an opportunity.

Friend’s parents pass on. Friends pass on. People get ill. Tragedies occur that remind us our time is not a given. Nobody expects that they’ll die young, but they do. You may project your ideal life to carry on until 95, but that will not necessarily make it reality. When we sober up about how delicate and precious life is, we are fully present in it.

10. You learn about who you are, and learn how to create a life that person will enjoy.

The portals of self-discovery are endless and not always obvious, and they don’t end after your mid-20s. As time goes on, you learn your habits, your preferences, what works and what doesn’t, what you want more of and less. That self-knowledge is invaluable, and makes up the building blocks of a life well-lived.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brianna-wiest/10-reasons-why-life-gets-better-as-you-grow-up-not-the-opposite-way-around_b_8611010.html?utm_hp_ref=healthy-living

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