What Are Normal Testosterone Levels in Men?

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As a society, we tend to place a lot of significance on certain words. The word “normal” is one of them. With that in mind, one of the most often asked questions in the field of men’s health is “what are normal testosterone levels in men?” Both the media and health professionals are capitalizing on this question by talking about “low T” and urging men to turn to hormone replacement therapy to boost their testosterone levels.

But before men should even consider taking steps to raise their testosterone levels (which can be done in a number of natural ways), we return to the basic question: what are normal testosterone levels in men? Here is the not-so-simple answer.

 

What are the forms of testosterone?

First of all, there is more than one form of testosterone:

  • One is bonded with sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which is the most common type and makes up about 65 percent of total testosterone. The testosterone attached to SHBG typically cannot be separated from the hormone, so this T is not considered to be bioavailable. Testosterone that is bioavailable is the form that is used by the body.
  • One is bonded to the protein albumin, making up about 35 percent of your total testosterone. This testosterone is considered to be potentially bioavailable because it can be “coaxed” away from the protein.
  • One is free, which means it is not attached to any protein. Free testosterone makes up about 2 percent of total T and is the form that is completely bioavailable to be used by the body. Free testosterone travels throughout the bloodstream and can bind to receptors in the muscles, brain, and other organs.

Getting your testosterone levels checked

After you undergo the simple blood test that measures your testosterone levels, your doctor will give you the results represented by three different numbers:

  • Total testosterone. This represents the total amount of testosterone that is circulating throughout your body, so it includes both types of bonded T plus free T
  • Bioavailable T, which consists of testosterone attached to albumin plus free T
  • Free T

Now comes the complicated part. The definition of “normal” testosterone varies, depending on the expert and the testing lab used. The good news is that there are general guidelines for “normal” testosterone. Here are the generally accepted normal ranges of total, free, and bioavailable T, given in nanograms of testosterone per deciliter (ng/dL) for different age groups:

Total T:

  • 240 to 950 ng/dL for men age 19 years and older

Free T:

  • 5.05 to 19.8 ng/dL for men 25 to 29
  • 4.86 to 19.0 ng/dL for ages 30 to 34
  • 4.65 to 18.1 ng/dL for ages 35 to 39
  • 4.46 to 17.1 ng/dL for ages 40 to 44
  • 4.28 to 16.4 ng/dL for ages 45 to 49
  • 4.06 to 15.6 ng/dL for ages 50 to 54
  • 3.87 to 14.7 ng/dL for ages 55 to 59
  • 3.67 to 13.0 ng/dL for ages 60 to 64
  • 3.47 to 13.0 ng/dL for ages 65 to 69
  • 3.28 to 12.2 ng/dL for ages 70 to 74

Bioavailable T:

  • 83 to 257 ng/dL for men 20 to 29
  • 72 to 235 ng/dL for men 30 to 39
  • 61 to 213 ng/dL for men 40 to 49
  • 50 to 190 ng/dL for men 50 to 59
  • 40 to 168 ng/dL for men 60 to 69

No ranges have been determined for men age 70 and older. Clinically low total testosterone levels are recognized as less than 220 to 300 ng/dL.

Bottom line on normal testosterone levels in men

Here is the bottom line when it comes to answering the question, what are normal testosterone levels in men.

  • The range of “normal” is wide, which accommodates the fact that every man’s needs are different.
  • While men’s total testosterone level can be within the normal range, their free T levels can be low, which can result in symptoms of low T.
  • The testosterone level men should be most interested is in the bioavailable number. If men can boost their bioavailable testosterone level, they should expect an increase in energy, sex drive, and muscle strength as well as better mood and well-being.

Article Source: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/what-are-normal-testosterone-levels-in-men_us_5968d687e4b06a2c8edb45e9

Written By: Craig Cooper

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

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Infertility in men could point to more serious health problems later in life

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Poor sperm quality affects about one in ten men and may lead to fertility problems. These men also have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer, which is the most common malignant disease of young males. And, even if they don’t develop testicular cancer, men with poor sperm quality tend to die younger than men who don’t have fertility problems.

Couples who can’t achieve pregnancy usually go to fertility clinics for treatment. At these clinics, emphasis is put on deciding whether the couple needs assisted reproduction or not, and, if so, to choose between different methods (such as IVF, IUI, or ICSI) for doing this. In most cases, these treatments lead to pregnancy and a live birth. So the problem seems to be solved. But if infertility is an early symptom of an underlying disease in the man, fertility clinics won’t pick it up.

Missed opportunity

Testicular cancer is easy to detect. In men seeking treatment for fertility problems, a simple ultrasound scan of the testes can reveal early cancer, so a life-threatening tumour can be prevented. If detected, 95% of all cases can be cured. But, unfortunately, testicular ultrasound scans are rarely performed at fertility clinics as the focus tends to be on sperm numbers and which method of assisted reproduction to use.

And testicular cancer is not the only threat to young infertile men’s health. Serious health problems, such as metabolic syndrome (high blood pressure, high blood sugar and obesity), type 2 diabetes and loss of bone mass are also much more common conditions among infertile men. These disorders are possible to prevent, but if left untreated often lead to premature death.

A possible culprit

At Lund University in Malmö, Sweden, we have – together with other research groups – made a number of studies focusing on the link between male fertility problems and subsequent risk of serious diseases. We cannot yet explain the causes, but testosterone deficiency is a strong candidate. My research team found that 30% of all men with impaired semen quality have low testosterone levels. And men totally lacking the hormone have early signs of diabetes and bone loss.

We recently conducted a study in which we investigated almost 4,000 men below the age of 50 and who had had their testosterone measured 25 years ago. We found that the risk of dying at a young age was doubled among those with low testosterone levels compared with men with normal levels of this hormone.

Although testosterone treatment may not necessarily be the best preventive measure, these findings makes it possible to identify men at high risk so that they can be advised about lifestyle changes, such as losing weight or quitting smoking – lifestyle changes that will help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

A relatively high proportion of men get in touch with their doctor about infertility problems and, as they represent a high-risk group for some of the most common diseases occurring later in life, perhaps it is time to change the routines for managing them. With the knowledge we now have regarding these men’s health, the least we can demand from doctors is to identify those who are at risk of serious diseases after they have become fathers. This is cheap and only requires simple tests. It is no longer enough to just evaluate the number of sperm.

 

Written by:  Aleksander Giwercman And Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman, The Conversation

Article Source: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-infertility-men-health-problems-life.html

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine