Your Risk Of Erectile Dysfunction More Than Triples If You Have This Health Condition

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High blood sugar can make it hard to get hard: Men with diabetes are significantly more likely to have erectile dysfunction that those with normal blood sugar readings, new research in the journal Diabetic Medicine concludes. That’s a problem, since diabetes cases have increased four-fold since 1980.

After crunching the numbers from 145 studies including over 88,000 men who averaged 56 years old, the researchers determined that those with diabetes were more than three times as likely to have erectile dysfunction than healthy guys were. In fact, 59 percent of men with diabetes had ED.

What’s more, men with diabetes tended to develop their erectile dysfunction 10 to 15 years earlier than those without the condition did, according to the study. (Want to keep your penis healthy for life?

So how can high blood sugar sink you in the bedroom?

Diabetes can damage your blood vessels and your nerves—both of which are needed for healthy erectile functioning, says Sean Skeldon, M.D., who has previously researched ED and diabetes, but was not involved in this study.

Another important point: Erectile dysfunction is often considered a harbinger of heart disease. That’s because the blood vessel issues that cause ED—say, like plaque buildup—can also affect your heart, too. They just manifest first with problems in the bedroom, since your blood vessels in your penis are smaller than the ones that carry blood to your heart. (Here are 8 other weird facts you never knew about your heart.)

The good news, though, is that many of the risk factors for diabetes are under your control—meaning your penis and your heart could benefit from some prevention strategies. One easy one? Eat three servings of legumes a week. That can cut your risk of diabetes by 35 percent, as we recently reported, possibly because their fiber can help prevent blood sugar spikes.

Written by: CHRISTA SGOBBA

Article Source: http://www.menshealth.com/health/diabetes-raises-erectile-dysfunction-risk?

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Infertility in men could point to more serious health problems later in life

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Poor sperm quality affects about one in ten men and may lead to fertility problems. These men also have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer, which is the most common malignant disease of young males. And, even if they don’t develop testicular cancer, men with poor sperm quality tend to die younger than men who don’t have fertility problems.

Couples who can’t achieve pregnancy usually go to fertility clinics for treatment. At these clinics, emphasis is put on deciding whether the couple needs assisted reproduction or not, and, if so, to choose between different methods (such as IVF, IUI, or ICSI) for doing this. In most cases, these treatments lead to pregnancy and a live birth. So the problem seems to be solved. But if infertility is an early symptom of an underlying disease in the man, fertility clinics won’t pick it up.

Missed opportunity

Testicular cancer is easy to detect. In men seeking treatment for fertility problems, a simple ultrasound scan of the testes can reveal early cancer, so a life-threatening tumour can be prevented. If detected, 95% of all cases can be cured. But, unfortunately, testicular ultrasound scans are rarely performed at fertility clinics as the focus tends to be on sperm numbers and which method of assisted reproduction to use.

And testicular cancer is not the only threat to young infertile men’s health. Serious health problems, such as metabolic syndrome (high blood pressure, high blood sugar and obesity), type 2 diabetes and loss of bone mass are also much more common conditions among infertile men. These disorders are possible to prevent, but if left untreated often lead to premature death.

A possible culprit

At Lund University in Malmö, Sweden, we have – together with other research groups – made a number of studies focusing on the link between male fertility problems and subsequent risk of serious diseases. We cannot yet explain the causes, but testosterone deficiency is a strong candidate. My research team found that 30% of all men with impaired semen quality have low testosterone levels. And men totally lacking the hormone have early signs of diabetes and bone loss.

We recently conducted a study in which we investigated almost 4,000 men below the age of 50 and who had had their testosterone measured 25 years ago. We found that the risk of dying at a young age was doubled among those with low testosterone levels compared with men with normal levels of this hormone.

Although testosterone treatment may not necessarily be the best preventive measure, these findings makes it possible to identify men at high risk so that they can be advised about lifestyle changes, such as losing weight or quitting smoking – lifestyle changes that will help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

A relatively high proportion of men get in touch with their doctor about infertility problems and, as they represent a high-risk group for some of the most common diseases occurring later in life, perhaps it is time to change the routines for managing them. With the knowledge we now have regarding these men’s health, the least we can demand from doctors is to identify those who are at risk of serious diseases after they have become fathers. This is cheap and only requires simple tests. It is no longer enough to just evaluate the number of sperm.

 

Written by:  Aleksander Giwercman And Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman, The Conversation

Article Source: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-infertility-men-health-problems-life.html

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Jerking Off Cuts Prostate Cancer Risk By 33 Percent: Male Orgasm Flushes Out Harmful Toxins, Theory Says

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Many men know a healthy diet and lifestyle provides some protection against prostate cancer. Eating less red meat, animal fats, and dairy fats and adding more fruits and vegetables promote good health, but science suggests men can also give their prostate a helping hand, literally. A study published in European Urology found having sex or jerking off can lower the risk of prostate cancer via the male orgasm.

There’s a link between how much men masturbate and their likelihood of developing prostate cancer. A total of 21 orgasms a month, either by having lots of sex or jerking off, can reduce the risk of disease by 33 percent.

“These findings provide additional evidence of a beneficial role of more frequent ejaculation throughout adult life in the etiology of PCa [prostate cancer], particularly for low-risk disease,” wrote the researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in the study.

However, it remains unclear why having this many orgams per month is good for the prostate.

One theory is that ejaculation flushes out harmful toxins and bacteria in the prostate gland that could cause inflammation. The prostate works by providing a fluid into semen during ejaculation that activates sperm, and prevents them from sticking together. High concentrations of potassium, zinc, fructose, and citric acid are drawn from the bloodstream.

Previous research has shown carcinogens found in cigarette smoke, like 3-methylcholanthrene, are also found in the prostate. This means carcinogens can build up over time, especially if men ejaculate less, which is known as the prostatic stagnation hypothesis. In theory, the more a man “flushes out” the ducts, the fewer carcinogens that are likely to linger around and damage the cells that line them.

Another theory proposed is ejaculation can lead the prostate glands to mature fully, which makes them less susceptible to carcinogens.

Approximately 32,000 men were surveyed on their number of orgasms as researchers tracked  those who developed prostate cancer over the course of decades. The study was a 10-year follow-up on questions answered on ejaculation frequency in 1992 and followed through to 2010. Average monthly ejaculation frequency was assessed during three periods: age 20–29; age 40–49; and the year before the questionnaire was distributed.

The researchers concluded daily masturbation throughout adulthood had a protective effect against prostate cancer. These findings echo results from a 2008 Harvard study that found there was no increased risk of prostate cancer related to age of ejaculation, but benefits increased as men aged. Yet, other studies have found men experience a reduced risk of prostate cancer if they frequently masturbated during young adulthood.

Jerking off as an effective preventative measure for prostate cancer remains murky. These studies suggest there is a connection between the two, but its effects seem to fluctuate depending on a man’s age. This warrants further research to determine what age group can reap the most benefits from daily masturbation for prostate health.

Prostate cancer mainly affects men over 50, and risk increases with age. About six in 10 cases of prostate cancer are found in men older than 65, according to the American Cancer Society. Other risk factors include race, genetics, weight, physical activity, diet, height, and chemical exposure.

The exact causes of prostate cancer remain unknown, but sticking to a healthy diet and lifestyle could offer protection. Perhaps men who give themselves a helping hand in the bedroom can also improve their prostate health. After all, relaxing and reducing stress can help increase longevity, and decrease the onset of disease.

Source: Rider JR, Wilson KM, Sinnott JA et al. Ejaculation Frequency and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Updated Results with an Additional Decade of Follow-up. European Urology. 2016.

Written By Lizette Borreli 

Article Source: http://www.medicaldaily.com/jerking-cuts-prostate-cancer-risk-33-percent-male-orgasm-flushes-out-harmful-419783

 

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Porn Use Linked to Erectile Dysfunction

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Men who are obsessed with pornography and prefer masturbation to sexual intercourse appear to be at increased risk for erectile dysfunction, a new study suggests.

Although these results need validation, urologists and other clinicians who treat men with erectile dysfunction and other forms of sexual dysfunction should ask patients about their use of pornography, and potentially recommend abstention, said Matthew Christman, MD, a urologist at the Naval Medical Center San Diego, California.

“The latest version of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has added internet gaming disorder. Internet porn has been shown in studies to be more addictive than internet gaming,” so it doesn’t seem to be much of a stretch to add something related to internet pornography use, said Dr Christman at a press briefing here at the American Urological Association (AUA) 2017 Annual Meeting.

A 2014 US armed forces health surveillance survey found that rates of erectile dysfunction had more than doubled during the preceding decade, from about 6 per 1000 person-years to about 13 per 1000 person-years, he reported. This increase was primarily accounted for by an increase in the incidence of psychogenic, rather than organic, erectile dysfunction, and coincided with the growth of pornography on the internet.

Web sites dedicated to pornography videos were first identified in 2006, “and soon after that, Kinsey Institute researchers became the first group to really identify what they describe as ‘pornography-induced erectile dysfunction,’ ” said Dr Christman.

Various research groups have postulated that sexual behavior acts on the same circuitry in the brain as addictive substances, and that internet pornography is a particularly strong stimulus of that circuitry. It is postulated that internet pornography increases sensitivity to pornographic cues and decreases sensitivity to normal stimuli, he explained.

Probably not a shocker, but men viewed pornography more than women. Dr Matthew Christman

 

To see whether there is a correlation between addiction to pornography and sexual dysfunction, Dr Christman and coauthor Jonathan Berger, MD, also from the Naval Medical Center San Diego, used an anonymous survey that included questions about sexual function, preferences, and pornography use, as well as the usual demographic and medical history questions.

The survey was offered to 20- to 40-year-old patients who presented to their urology clinic.

A total of 439 men received questionnaires, and 314 (71.5%) responded. In all, 71 women were given the surveys, and 48 (68%) responded. The majority of both male and female responders were active-duty military (96.8% and 58%, respectively).

Men were evaluated for sexual function with the International Index of Erectile Function 15-item questionnaire, and women with the validated Female Sexual Function Index. Addiction to pornography was measured by two validated instruments: the Pornography Craving Questionnaire and the Obsessive Passion Scale.

“Probably not a shocker, but men viewed pornography more than women,” Dr Christman said.

Among men, 81% reported viewing pornography at least some of the time compared with 38% of women (P ≤ .001)

There were no significant differences in the duration of pornography episodes, with the majority of both men and women reporting they used it for 15 minutes or less at a time.

Preferred sources for pornography were also similar for men and women, with internet porn on computers being the most common, followed by internet porn on telephones. Women reported using books more frequently than men.

In all, 27% of male respondents had sexual dysfunction, as defined by an International Index of Erectile Function score of 25 or less, and 52% of females had sexual dysfunction, as defined by a Female Sexual Function Index score of 26.55 or less.

When they looked at correlations between erectile dysfunction and preferences for pornography in men, the investigators found that the rate of dysfunction was lowest among the 85% of respondents who reported preferring intercourse without pornography (22%). The incidence of dysfunction increased in men who preferred intercourse with pornography (31%), and was highest among men who preferred masturbation with pornography (79%).

The finding was consistent across all five domains of the sexual dysfunction questionnaire: erection, orgasm, libido, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction.

There were no significant correlations between pornography use and sexual dysfunction in women, however.

Asked by Medscape Medical News whether a patient’s use of pornography mattered clinically, Dr Christman replied that mental health providers at his center who have treated patients for pornography addiction have observed resolution of sexual dysfunction once those patients were able to curtail their pornography use.

I think these investigators are characterizing something that is a real clinical entity.Dr Joseph Alukal

“I think these investigators are characterizing something that is a real clinical entity,” said Joseph Alukal, MD, director of male reproductive health at New York University in New York City and moderator of the briefing in which the data were presented.

“This research represents a beginning to asking this question of how we identify these people and treat them,” he added.

“The clinical impact of erectile dysfunction is a common problem and a burdensome problem, so if this represents some subset of patients who have this common and burdensome problem, and we can treat them with an intervention as simple as ‘you should doing behavior X,’ that’s important,” he said in an interview with Medscape Medical News.

He routinely asks younger patients about pornography use and masturbation habits, and can confirm that for patients with a serious pornography habit, discontinuation can improve their sexual function, he said.

The study was internally supported. Dr Christman, Dr Berger, and Dr Alukal have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr Christman stated that the views expressed in the presentation are those of the authors and do not reflect official policy or position of the US Navy, Department of Defense, or US government.

American Urological Association (AUA) 2017 Annual Meeting: Abstracts PD44-11 and PD69-12, Presented in a briefing May 12, 2017.

Written By: Neil Osterweil

Article Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/879982#vp_1

 

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Surprising Dangers of Elevated Uric Acid

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Elevated levels of uric acid are associated with gout, an excruciating form of arthritis.

More recent evidence demonstrates powerful correlations between high uric acid levels and some of the most deadly conditions of our time, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, kidney failure, and cardiovascular disorders.1-5

In 2016-2017, a group of studies appeared linking uric acid elevations to bipolar disorder.6-9

Many people don’t realize that it is possible to have high uric acid without having gout. About 21% of Americans have elevated levels of uric acid (hyperuricemia), but only 4% suffer from gout.10

A 2016 study highlighted a natural plant extract, called Terminalia bellerica, that can effectively lower uric acid blood levels without the side effects associated with prescription drugs.11

Let’s look at how lowering uric acid blood levels is an important step not only in addressing gout, but also in helping prevent life-shortening diseases.11

Terminalia Bellerica Lowers Uric Acid

Terminalia bellerica is a tree native to lower elevations in Southeast Asia, whose fruit has been used for centuries in Indian traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases, particularly diabetes.12

In 2011, a component of the T. bellerica fruit rind, gallic acid, was shown to promote antidiabetic activity in a study of diabetic rats.12 In that study, the extract lowered blood sugar levels, and, in a surprising finding, the animals’ pancreases showed regeneration of their insulin-producing islet cells.

Additional beneficial effects noted in that study included reductions in serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, urea, creatinine (a measure of kidney dysfunction when elevated)—and also uric acid.12

Other studies have shown that T. bellerica has protective properties against oxidative stress, which in turn are thought to directly inhibit the action of an enzyme involved in the synthesis of uric acid.11,13

Human Studies

These findings in diabetic rats led a group of Indian researchers to perform a randomized, controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy and tolerability of a standardized extract of T. bellerica at lowering uric acid levels in humans.11

For the study, 110 people with elevated uric acid received one of the following: a placebo, 40 mg daily of the uric-acid lowering drug febuxostat, 500 mg of T. chebula extract twice daily, or either 250 mg or 500 mg of T. bellerica standardized extracts twice daily.

After 24 weeks, the uric acid levels in the placebo recipients had risen significantly compared to baseline levels. In contrast, all non-placebo groups showed a reduction in uric acid levels compared to baseline and to placebo subjects.11

The most effective dose of T. bellerica was at 500 mg twice daily, which reduced uric acid levels by nearly twice as much as the lower dose.

And while the T. bellerica treatment was only about 60% as effective as the prescription drug febuxostat at reducing uric acid levels, it achieved these results without the side effects associated with this drug,11 which include liver function abnormalities, rash, nausea, and joint pain.14

Because the other common uric acid-lowering drug, allopurinol, also carries a wide range of side effects—including a potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity syndrome15T. bellerica supplementation offers a leap forward in safely lowering high uric acid levels while reducing risks of the conditions associated with them.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

The Dangers of High Uric Acid

  • Uric acid, a byproduct of normal cell growth and turnover, builds up in our bloodstreams as we age, and is exacerbated by the modern American diet.

  • While initially associated with gout, rising uric acid levels are now associated with many dangerous, lifespan-shortening conditions including cardiovascular and kidney disease, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

  • While all of these conditions are proving challenging to treat using modern mainstream medicine, most are proving amenable to prevention with natural compounds.

  • Terminalia bellerica is an Asian tree whose fruit contains valuable bioactive compounds long used in Indian traditional medicine.

  • Extracts of T. bellerica have now been shown to safely and effectively reduce uric acid in humans.

  • Given the anticipated benefits of across-the-board uric acid reduction, these findings make T. bellerica extracts an essential part of any disease-preventing strategy.

Why is it Important to Lower Uric Acid Levels?

Our bodies naturally produce uric acid when we break down and recycle the molecules that constitute DNA and RNA. An enzyme called xanthine oxidase is responsible for conversion of those compounds into uric acid, which is then normally excreted in the urine.

But age-related declines in kidney function lead to impaired excretion and gradual buildup of uric acid in the blood, accounting for the elevated serum uric acid levels in up to 25% of adults.16

Making matters worse, a diet rich in red meats and sugars, especially fructose—in other words, the typical American diet—can sharply increase uric acid production, further exacerbating the problem.17,18 In fact, gout has historically been called “the disease of kings” because of its association with rich diets.19

While gout was the original disorder associated with high uric acid, more recent evidence reveals that it is associated with conditions that are far worse.

Uric acid blood levels above 8.6 mg/dL in men or 7.1 mg/dL in women are classified as hyperuricemia (although some laboratories and research groups use different limits).20,21 High uric acid levels have now been found to be significantly associated with risks for:

  • Decreasing kidney function22
  • Chronic low-level inflammation, itself a major risk factor for many chronic disorders23
  • Metabolic syndrome18,24,25
  • Type II diabetes26-28
  • A wide array of cardiovascular risks, including elevated blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and risk of death from heart attacks and strokes.1,29-35

TABLE: Risk Elevations Associated with High Uric Acid Levels

Condition Risk Increase With Elevated Uric Acid
Kidney failure 7% per 1 mg/dL increase22
Chronic inflammation as measured by hs-CRP 52%23
Metabolic syndrome 410%25
Diabetes 18% per 1 mg/dL increase26
Unstable lipid-rich arterial plaques 143%36
Prehypertension 44%34
Atrial fibrillation (cardiac arrhythmia) 67%35
Heart muscle enlargement 96% in highest vs. lowest uric acid levels;
26% increase per 1 mg/dL elevation of uric acid31
In-Hospital death from heart attack 432%32
Major adverse cardiac event (death,
congestive heart failure, repeat heart attack, stroke)
184%33

 

The Table above shows elevations in risks associated with high uric acid levels in blood.

If recent findings are any indication, these conditions may represent only the tip of the uric acid iceberg.

For example, in 2016 and 2017, a group of Italian researchers published several papers demonstrating that elevated uric acid levels play a role in bipolar disorder,6-8 while a 2015 study related high uric acid with depression in adolescents.37

Several drugs can be effective for many cases of major depression. Yet very few drugs are helpful with bipolar disorder, a condition that’s possibly even more heartbreaking than depression.

Together, the evidence that uric acid plays a major role in so many human disorders presents an opportunity for intervention with a safe, effective, plant extract, T. bellerica.

Summary

Levels of uric acid rise with age, exacerbated by declining kidney function and our meat- and sugar-rich diets.

Formerly associated mostly with painful gout, we now know that uric acid elevations threaten millions more people with elevated risks for kidney disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and a wide range of cardiovascular disorders.

Exciting research has revealed the potent uric acid-lowering effect of extracts from the fruits of the Terminalia bellerica tree, a South Asian shade tree long used in traditional medicine.

These findings suggest one more natural way to combat the risks of so many age-related disorders—and they make T. bellerica an important weapon in our arsenal against premature aging and death.

 

References

  1. Jin M, Yang F, Yang I, et al. Uric acid, hyperuricemia and vascular diseases. Front Biosci (Landmark Ed). 2012;17:656-69.
  2. Ford ES, Li C, Cook S, et al. Serum concentrations of uric acid and the metabolic syndrome among US children and adolescents. Circulation. 2007;115(19):2526-32.
  3. Lehto S, Niskanen L, Ronnemaa T, et al. Serum uric acid is a strong predictor of stroke in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Stroke. 1998;29(3):635-9.
  4. Schretlen DJ, Inscore AB, Vannorsdall TD, et al. Serum uric acid and brain ischemia in normal elderly adults. Neurology. 2007;69(14):1418-23.
  5. Siu YP, Leung KT, Tong MK, et al. Use of allopurinol in slowing the progression of renal disease through its ability to lower serum uric acid level. Am J Kidney Dis. 2006;47(1):51-9.
  6. Bartoli F, Crocamo C, Dakanalis A, et al. Purinergic system dysfunctions in subjects with bipolar disorder: A comparative cross-sectional study. Compr Psychiatry. 2017;73:1-6.
  7. Bartoli F, Crocamo C, Gennaro GM, et al. Exploring the association between bipolar disorder and uric acid: A mediation analysis. J Psychosom Res. 2016;84:56-9.
  8. Bartoli F, Crocamo C, Mazza MG, et al. Uric acid levels in subjects with bipolar disorder: A comparative meta-analysis. J Psychiatr Res. 2016;81:133-9.
  9. Machado-Vieira R, Salem H, Frey BN, et al. Convergent lines of evidence support the role of uric acid levels as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder. Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2017;17(2): 107-8.
  10. Zhu Y, Pandya BJ, Choi HK. Prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008. Arthritis Rheum. 2011;63(10):3136-41.
  11. Usharani P, Nutalapati C, Pokuri VK, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-, and positive-controlled clinical pilot study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of standardized aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellerica in subjects with hyperuricemia. Clin Pharmacol. 2016;8:51-9.
  12. Latha RC, Daisy P. Insulin-secretagogue, antihyperlipidemic and other protective effects of gallic acid isolated from Terminalia bellerica Roxb. in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Chem Biol Interact. 2011;189(1-2):112-8.
  13. Hazra B, Sarkar R, Biswas S, et al. Comparative study of the antioxidant and reactive oxygen species scavenging properties in the extracts of the fruits of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica and Emblica officinalis. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2010;10:20.
  14. Love BL, Barrons R, Veverka A, et al. Urate-lowering therapy for gout: focus on febuxostat. Pharmacotherapy. 2010;30(6):594-608.
  15. Lupton GP, Odom RB. The allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1979;1(4):365-74.
  16. Vitart V, Rudan I, Hayward C, et al. SLC2A9 is a newly identified urate transporter influencing serum urate concentration, urate excretion and gout. Nat Genet. 2008;40(4):437-42.
  17. Angelopoulos TJ, Lowndes J, Zukley L, et al. The effect of high-fructose corn syrup consumption on triglycerides and uric acid. J Nutr. 2009;139(6):1242S-5S.
  18. Cirillo P, Sato W, Reungjui S, et al. Uric acid, the metabolic syndrome, and renal disease. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006;17(12 Suppl 3):S165-8.
  19. Giuffra V, Minozzi S, Vitiello A, et al. On the history of gout: paleopathological evidence from the Medici family of Florence. Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2017;35(2):321-6.
  20. Schlesinger N, Norquist JM, Watson DJ. Serum urate during acute gout. J Rheumatol. 2009;36(6):1287-9.
  21. Sun SZ, Flickinger BD, Williamson-Hughes PS, et al. Lack of association between dietary fructose and hyperuricemia risk in adults. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010;7:16.
  22. Tsai CW, Lin SY, Kuo CC, et al. Serum Uric Acid and Progression of Kidney Disease: A Longitudinal Analysis and Mini-Review. PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170393.
  23. Raeisi A, Ostovar A, Vahdat K, et al. Association of serum uric acid with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women. Climacteric. 2017;20(1):44-8.
  24. Choi H, Kim HC, Song BM, et al. Serum uric acid concentration and metabolic syndrome among elderly Koreans: The Korean Urban Rural Elderly (KURE) study. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016;64:51-8.
  25. Rubio-Guerra AF, Morales-Lopez H, Garro-Almendaro AK, et al. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome. Curr Diabetes Rev. 2017;13(1):87-90.
  26. Juraschek SP, McAdams-Demarco M, Miller ER, et al. Temporal relationship between uric acid concentration and risk of diabetes in a community-based study population. Am J Epidemiol. 2014;179(6):684-91.
  27. Moleda P, Fronczyk A, Safranow K, et al. Is Uric Acid a Missing Link between Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes at a Later Time of Life? PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0154921.
  28. Sun HL, Pei D, Lue KH, et al. Uric Acid Levels Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome and Hypertension in Adolescents: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study. PLoS One. 2015;10(11):e0143786.
  29. Clarson LE, Hider SL, Belcher J, et al. Increased risk of vascular disease associated with gout: a retrospective, matched cohort study in the UK clinical practice research datalink. Ann Rheum Dis. 2015;74(4):642-7.
  30. Singh JA. When gout goes to the heart: does gout equal a cardiovascular disease risk factor? Ann Rheum Dis. 2015;74(4):631-4.
  31. Cuspidi C, Facchetti R, Bombelli M, et al. Uric Acid and New Onset Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Findings From the PAMELA Population. Am J Hypertens. 2017.
  32. Gazi E, Temiz A, Altun B, et al. The association between serum uric acid level and heart failure and mortality in the early period of ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars. 2014;42(6):501-8.
  33. Kawabe M, Sato A, Hoshi T, et al. Gender differences in the association between serum uric acid and prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome. J Cardiol. 2016;67(2):170-6.
  34. Lotufo PA, Baena CP, Santos IS, et al. Serum Uric Acid and Prehypertension Among Adults Free of Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: Baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Angiology. 2016;67(2):180-6.
  35. Tamariz L, Hernandez F, Bush A, et al. Association between serum uric acid and atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Heart Rhythm. 2014;11(7):1102-8.
  36. Ando K, Takahashi H, Watanabe T, et al. Impact of Serum Uric Acid Levels on Coronary Plaque Stability Evaluated Using Integrated Backscatter Intravascular Ultrasound in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease. J Atheroscler Thromb. 2016;23(8):932-9.
  37. Tao R, Li H. High serum uric acid level in adolescent depressive patients. J Affect Disord. 2015;174:464-6.

 

Article By:By Stephen Curtis

Article Source: http://www.lifeextension.com/Magazine/2017/7/Surprising-Facts-About-Uric-Acid/Page-01?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=normal

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Bone Density, Anemia Improve With Testosterone in Low-T Men

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Study Highlights

  • Snyder and colleagues:
    • Study participants were men at least 65 years old with 2 serum testosterone results of less than 275 ng/dL.
    • Men were randomly assigned to receive testosterone gel with titration to maintain serum testosterone levels commensurate with those of a young man, or placebo gel. The treatment period was 12 months.
    • The main study outcome was BMD. Participants underwent BMD testing with quantitative computed tomography and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry of the spine and hip at baseline and at 12 months.
    • 211 men participated in the trial. The mean age of participants was 72.3 years, and the baseline mean testosterone level was slightly more than 230 ng/dL.
    • vBMD increased in the testosterone group by a mean of 7.5%, compared with an increase of only 0.8% in the placebo group (P <.01).
    • Measurements of hip trabecular and peripheral vBMD were also superior in the testosterone group vs the placebo group.
    • Testosterone appeared more effective in increasing trabecular vs peripheral BMD, and in improving BMD in the spine vs the hip.
    • 19 fractures were reported during the treatment year and 1 year after the treatment period, with no evidence of a difference in fracture rates in comparing the testosterone group vs the placebo group.
  • Roy and colleagues:
    • The study was conducted as a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among men 65 years or older. All participants had a serum testosterone level of less than 275 ng/dL.
    • Men were randomly assigned to receive testosterone gel with titration to maintain serum testosterone levels commensurate with those of a young man, or placebo gel. The treatment period was 12 months.
    • There were 788 men in the study, of whom 126 were anemic, as defined by a hemoglobin level of 12.7 g/dL or lower. Approximately half of men with anemia had no known cause for anemia.
    • The main study outcome was the effect of testosterone therapy on hemoglobin levels among men with anemia.
    • The mean age of participants was 74.8 years, and the mean serum testosterone level among men with anemia was 222 ng/dL at baseline.
    • 54% of men with unexplained anemia who were treated with testosterone experienced an increase in hemoglobin levels of 1.0 g/dL or more, compared with only 15% of men with similar anemia treated with placebo (adjusted OR, 31.5; 95% CI, 3.7-277.8).
    • 58.3% of men treated with testosterone experienced resolution of their anemia, compared with 22.2% of men treated with placebo.
    • Testosterone also raised hemoglobin levels vs placebo among men with a known cause of anemia.
    • Hemoglobin levels increased past 17.5 g/dL in 6 men without anemia at baseline.

Clinical Implications

  • A retrospective cohort study by Cheetham and colleagues finds that testosterone therapy among men with evidence of testosterone deficiency is associated with lower risks for cardiac disease and cerebrovascular disease, even among men older than 65 years and those with preexisting cardiovascular disease.
  • Two new studies demonstrate that testosterone treatment can correct anemia and improve BMD among men with low testosterone levels at baseline.
  • Implications for the Healthcare Team: The current studies further demonstrate potential benefits of testosterone therapy among men with testosterone deficiency. Testosterone therapy was also associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular events in one study. Nonetheless, clinicians should continue to perform shared decision making regarding testosterone therapy and apply this treatment only among men with established testosterone deficiency.

Article Source: http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/876307

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Colon Cancer Screening: What You Need to Know

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Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States today. It’s a serious American health problem, says Johns Hopkins gastroenterologist Francis Giardiello, M.D.

However, there are many ways you can decrease your risk or even prevent colon cancer. The single best thing you can do to prevent colon cancer is to get screened.

Giardiello breaks down what you should know about the colon cancer screening options available today.

Q. Why is colon cancer screening important?

A. Colon cancer develops from a small polyp that occurs in the lining of the colon. That small polyp slowly grows larger and larger. Once large enough, that polyp develops cancer and starts to spread.

It’s important to remember the process of polyp to cancer takes about 10 years to occur. That’s plenty of time to get a screening to catch it — and get rid of it — before it turns to cancer.

Think of a polyp as a mushroom sitting on a stalk (your intestine’s lining). If a doctor identifies it on a colonoscopy, he or she can easily put a lasso (or a loop) around the stalk and cut off the mushroom. No mushroom means no cancer.

Q. How do you screen for colon cancer?

There’s more than one way to be screened for colon cancer today.

These options include:

Colonoscopy: Before a colonoscopy, you’ll be asked to prep your bowel by drinking a liquid that helps clear out your colon. Then, doctors use a scope that has a camera attached to one end to examine inside your colon for polyps or cancer. Because the scope movement can cause discomfort, you’ll be sedated during the procedure. If a polyp is found, your doctor can remove it at the same time.

Fecal occult blood test: This test looks for blood in your stool. You place a small bowel movement sample on a provided card and send it to a lab, where it is tested for blood. If blood is detected, your doctor might recommend you get a colonoscopy for further testing.

Fecal immuno testing: This is similar to fecal occult testing, except you place the bowel movement sample in tubes. Depending on the results, you may require further testing.

Sigmoidoscopy: A sigmoidoscope is another type of scope that only looks at the bottom third of the colon, where 60 percent of cancers occur.

Barium enema: During this test, barium liquid is placed in the rectum through an enema, and then an X-ray is taken. The barium highlights any polyps or cancer for the doctor viewing the X-ray.

Virtual colonoscopy: You undergo a CT scan that takes a detailed picture of the colon.

Stool gene testing: This is a newer type of stool sample screening. Instead of testing for blood, the lab looks for certain gene changes that can indicate colon cancer.

Q. How do you know which screening is right for you?

A. Many physicians recommend most healthy people get a colonoscopy every 10 years starting at age 50 — that’s when most colon cancers start to develop. A colonoscopy is the most effective way doctors identify colon cancer.

Each type of screening has its own pros and cons. Your doctor can provide more information on screening options and recommend which is best for you based on several factors, including your:

  •  Family history
  • Overall health
  •  Personal preferences

 

Article Source: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/articles-and-answers/ask-the-expert/colon-cancer-screening-what-you-need-to-know?utm_medium=social&utm_source=Facebook&utm_campaign=Surgeryh&utm_content=RectalCancer

 

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

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