A Man’s Body by Decade

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Heart

The problem: As men age, blood pressure and cholesterol levels often increase. The fix: Eat a heart-healthy diet, exercise, and have your blood pressure and cholesterol levels checked annually. Consider a coronary calcium scan above age 50, if heart disease runs in the family.

Skin

The problem: Men ignore their skin more often than women. The fix: Get an annual head-to-toe skin screen by a dermatologist to evaluate suspicious moles and other skin conditions.

Muscle

The problem: Men begin losing muscle mass by age 30. The fix: Incorporate muscle training into your fitness routine to help increase bone density, metabolism, and muscle-fat ratio, while maintaining flexibility and balance.

Colon

The problem: Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in men. The fix: Eat a diet high in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, and low in red meat and alcohol. Consider a colon­oscopy at age 50, particularly if colon cancer runs in the family.

Prostate

The problem: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (an enlarged prostate) affects about 50 percent of men between the ages of 51 and 60 and up to 90 percent of men older than 80. The fix: Eat a low-fat diet, exercise, and undergo a prostate exam by age 50 or sooner if at high risk for prostate cancer.

Testosterone

The problem: Levels typically decrease with age, with about 20 percent of men having low T by their 60s. The fix: See a doctor to get your testosterone levels checked, if experiencing a drop in libido, energy level, unexplained weight gain, or ongoing depression.

Article Source: http://www.johnshopkinshealthreview.com/issues/spring-summer-2017/articles/a-users-guide-to-mens-health

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Why glutathione is important to us

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 One important protein that appears in every human cell is a tripeptide known as glutathione.

Found in the highest concentrations in the liver, it consists of three amino acids: glutamic acid, L-cysteine and L-glycine.

The first record of glutathione was in 1888, but it was not until 1984 that its function in the body began to be researched in detail.

It turns out that glutathione serves as an antioxidant and detoxifier that protects cells from free radicals and oxidative stress, thus, improving the immune system.

But glutathione levels in human cells begin to decline after you turn 20. In order to produce more glutathione, supplementation of L-cysteine is recommended.

In the absence of glutathione, the body will experience several things. All the cells in the body would face premature death, causing the liver, which cleanses your body of toxic materials, to malfunction.

Worse, the entire immune system will break down – in other words, without glutathione, humans would cease to exist.

How glutathione works

Glutathione is the only antioxidant that is intracellular, meaning that it acts inside the cells. This helps to resist disease by neutralising free radicals and keeping other antioxidants like vitamins C and E in their active form.

Many scientists believe there is a link between low glutathione levels and cell death, which could be why the levels of glutathione in patients with serious diseases such as AIDS and cancer, are typically very low.

On the other hand, clinical observations of people aged 100 and more in various countries like Poland, Italy and Denmark, have found very high levels of glutathione in their cells.

Other functions of this protein include helping to process toxins in the liver; DNA and protein synthesis; and regulating the nitric oxide cycle and the metabolism of iron.

Key benefits of glutathione

Decreased levels of glutathione have several consequences that are linked to a number of age-related illnesses. This includes:

Alzheimer’s disease and macular degeneration – A University of Alabama study in the United States revealed that the red blood cells in male Alzheimer’s patients indicated a significant lack of glutathione.

Heart disease – A study of patients with heart disease found that the lower their levels of glutathione, the higher the likelihood of them experiencing a heart attack.

Cancer – While glutathione is not able to cure cancer, several studies suggest that the growth of new cancer cells may be reduced. Its strong antioxidant properties make it suitable as a supplement.

This is why some doctors recommend it as a supplement to treat cancer, as it improves the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs and reduces their side effects.

Psychiatric illnesses, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression – These have been linked to low levels of glutathione. The lack of antioxidant abilities in the brain can cause oxidative stress.

Glutathione has also been used to treat Parkinson’s disease, sickle cell anaemia, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and poisoning, as it is able to cleanse the body of unhealthy metals such as mercury.

Glutathione has been found to improve the quality of the human male sperm. This is achieved by the lowering of blood pressure and decreasing oxidative stress on the sensitive sperm cells, hence, minimising damage to their DNA cargo.

Couples who are trying to conceive should look for micronutrient supplements, especially n-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), which is used in the body to produce L-glutathione.

The aspiring father could also benefit from consuming scientifically-proven nutrients such as arginine, carnitine and pine bark extract.

Because it is a protein, a fair amount of glutathione that you ingest is broken down in your gut and eliminated before reaching the cells.

 

Article Source: http://www.star2.com/living/viewpoints/2016/05/29/why-glutathione-is-important-to-us/#v9QZZBkX3X5BqJzk.99

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Weight-Bearing Exercises Promote Bone Formation in Men

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Human hormone and protein linked to bone mass are impacted by 12 months of targeted exercise

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide and is a serious public health concern, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Now, Pamela Hinton, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, has published the first study in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1, a hormone associated with bone growth. These changes promote bone formation, increasing bone density.

“People may be physically active, and many times people know they need to exercise to prevent obesity, heart disease or diabetes,” Hinton said. “However, you also really need to do specific exercises to protect your bone health.”

In the study, men 25- to 60-years-old who had low-bone mass were split into two groups. One group performed resistance training exercises such as lunges and squats using free weights. The other group performed various types of jumps, such as single-leg and double-leg jumps. After 12 months of performing the exercises, Hinton then compared the levels of bone proteins and hormones in the blood.

“We saw a decrease in the level of sclerostin in both of these exercise interventions in men,” Hinton said. “When sclerostin is expressed at high levels, it has a negative impact on bone formation. In both resistance and jump training, the level of sclerostin in the bone goes down, which triggers bone formation.”

The other significant change Hinton observed was an increase in the hormone IGF-1. Unlike sclerostin, IGF-1 triggers bone growth. The decrease of harmful sclerostin levels and the increase in beneficial IGF-1 levels confirmed Hinton’s prior research that found both resistance training and jump training have beneficial effects on bone growth.

To increase bone mass and prevent osteoporosis, Hinton recommends exercising specifically to target bone health. While exercises such as swimming and cycling are beneficial to overall health, these activities do not strengthen the skeleton. Hinton suggests also doing exercise targeted for bone health, such as resistance training and jump training.

The study, “Serum sclerostin decreases following 12 months of resistance- or jump-training in men with low bone mass,” was published in Bone.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-03/uom-wep032217.php

 

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Testosterone Does Not Appear to Increase The Risk For Cardiovascular Disease

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Testosterone replacement therapy does not appear to increase the risk for cardiovascular disease or thromboembolic events in middle-aged men.

In fact, the risk for a cardiovascular event was lower in men taking supplemental testosterone than in those who were not, said lead investigator Julian Hanske, MD, from Ruhr University Bochum in Herne, Germany, who collaborated on the study during a fellowship at Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston.

But physicians should know whether a patient suffers from obstructive sleep apnea before prescribing testosterone, Dr Hanske said here at the European Association of Urology 2017 Congress.

Cohort studies of the cardiovascular and thromboembolic consequences of supplemental testosterone have generally relied on sources such as the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Medicare database, which is limited to an older population, he told Medscape Medical News.

To get a better handle on the relative risks associated with testosterone replacement therapy in a younger population, Dr Hanske and his team searched the TRICARE American military insurance database, which covers all retired and active-duty military personnel and their dependents.

They looked for men 40 to 65 years of age treated for low levels of testosterone. Patients were excluded if they had a history of heart disease, thromboembolism, prostate cancer, or obstructive sleep apnea.

For the final cohort, 3422 men who took testosterone were matched with 3422 control subjects who did not by year of birth, then by date of first testosterone prescription, and then by race and baseline comorbidities.

The study outcomes were event-free survival and absolute risk for cardiovascular disease, thromboembolism or obstructive sleep apnea.

We have so many fears of testosterone replacement therapy.

Cardiovascular event-free survival was significantly better in the testosterone group than in the control group (P = .0085), and risk for coronary artery disease was lower in the testosterone group (P = .0082).

There was no difference in thromboembolic event-free survival between the testosterone and control groups (P = .0998).

These findings are reassuring, said session comoderator Raanan Tal, MD, head of the male infertility program at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel.

“We have so many fears of testosterone replacement therapy, and actually what they showed is that so many beliefs that we have cannot be supported,” he told Medscape Medical News.

“The fact that you don’t have an increase in cardiovascular events or thrombotic events is an important message — more important than the risk of increased obstructive sleep apnea,” he explained.

But the other comoderator said he thinks the findings would be more compelling if the investigators had used propensity-score matching or a similar statistical method to ensure a close case–control match.

“Age is a risk factor,” Andrea Salonia, MD, from the Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Milan, pointed out. “The younger the patient, the lower the probability of having difficulties sleeping at night, and they did not adjust for that specific issue, or at least they did not find any kind of difference according to this specific variable.”

“At the same time, the number of patients they considered was amazing, and it is probably one of the most important studies in terms of the huge cohort they selected,” Dr Salonia told Medscape Medical News.

Dr Hanske, Dr Tal, and Dr Salonia have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

European Association of Urology (EAU) 2017 Congress: Abstract 256. Presented March 25, 2017.

Article Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/877786

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Testosterone therapy improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic men

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The January 2016 issue of the journal Diabetes Care reported the outcome of a randomized trial that revealed a beneficial role for testosterone treatment in men with diabetes.

“We hypothesized that testosterone may be an anti-inflammatory and insulin sensitizing agent since it has been known for some time that testosterone reduces adiposity and increases skeletal muscle,” remarked lead researcher Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, who is a Distinguished Professor at the State University of New York and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism in the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Buffalo. “Our previous work has shown that obesity is associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, and inflammatory mediators are known to interfere with insulin signaling.”

The trial included 94 type 2 diabetic men, among whom 44 had low testosterone levels and reduced insulin signaling genes indicative of decreased insulin sensitivity. Participants with low testosterone received a weekly testosterone injection or a placebo for 24 weeks. Body weight, body fat, markers of inflammation, insulin sensitivity and other factors were assessed before and after treatment.

At the end of the trial, men who received testosterone experienced a more than six pound average loss of body fat and an equal increase in muscle mass. They also had lower levels of the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, interleukin-1b and tumor necrosis factor-a. “Most importantly, we saw a dramatic increase in insulin sensitivity, demonstrated by a 32 percent increase in the uptake of glucose by tissues in response to insulin,” Dr Dandona reported.

“Testosterone treatment for men, where indicated, will improve sexual function and increase skeletal muscle strength and bone density,” Dr Dandona noted. “This is the first definitive evidence that testosterone is an insulin sensitizer and hence a metabolic hormone.”

Article Source: http://www.lifeextension.com/WhatsHot/2015/11/November-Whats-Hot-Articles/Page-01#test

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Jane Fonda reveals testosterone is the secret behind her sex success at 73

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She has attributed her youthful looks to a healthy love life and given hope to millions by saying she had the best sex of her life at 71.

So it is something of a let down to find out that even sex symbol Jane Fonda needs artificial help.

The Barbarella star has revealed she took the male sex hormone testosterone from the age of 70 to boost her libido.

Miss Fonda said it made ‘a huge difference’.

Advising other women of a certain age how to pep up their love lives, three-times married actress, political activist and fitness guru said: ‘Here’s something I haven’t said publicly yet: I discovered testosterone about three years ago, which makes a huge difference if you want to remain sexual and your libido has dropped.

‘Use testosterone, it comes in a gel, pill or patch.’

Earlier this year, Robbie Williams shocked his legions of female fans by admitting he was injecting himself with testosterone to boost his sex drive.

Although testosterone is usually thought of as a male hormone, it is also made by women, but in much smaller amounts.

Levels drop off after the menopause, leading to some doctors prescribing testosterone alongside more traditional hormone replacement therapy.

It is relatively cheap, costing around £50 for six months’ supply and comes in patches, implants and gels.

But a reinvigorated love life can come at a cost.

Miss Fonda, now 73, and in a relationship with music producer Richard Perry, who is four years her junior, told the Sunday Telegraph: ‘I had to stop because it was giving me acne.

‘It’s one thing to have plastic surgery, but it is quite another to have adolescence acne. That is going too far.’

Two years ago, she created envy in millions of bedrooms by telling how she was having the best sex of her life, despite having had spinal surgery and boasting an artificial knee and a titanium hip.

She said: ‘How do I still look good?  I owe 30 per cent to genes, 30 per cent to good sex, 30 per cent because of sports and healthy lifestyle with proper nutrition and for the remaining ten per cent, I have to thank my plastic surgeon.

But I’m happier, the sex is better and I understand life better. I don’t want to be young again.’

More recently, she has devoted 50 pages of her new autobiography to explaining how couples can keep the passion alive long after the vigour of their youth has failed.

However, her use of testosterone has remained secret until now.

British experts welcomed the revelation.

Professor John Studd, of the London PMS and Menopause Clinic has been prescribing testosterone for women for 30 years.

He said: ‘It is not just about libido.  The benefits include more energy, more self-confidence, better mood and all of those things.’

He added that carefully balancing the dose should remove the risk of side-effects such as acne and excessive bodily or facial hair.

Dr John Stevenson chairman of the charity Women’s Health Concern, said: ‘Jane Fonda clearly thinks there should be no time limit to being sexually active, which is fine. Good for her.’

However, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists warns that the long-term consequences of the treatment are unknown.

THE TRUTH BEHIND TESTOSTERONE

Testosterone can be part of the hormone replacement therapy given to menopausal women.

Gels that are rubbed into the skin are the most popular.  But patches, creams and implants are also available.

Topping up levels of the hormone can give a woman in her 50s or 60s the libido of someone half her age, as well as boost energy and mood.

But too high a dose carries the risk of acne and greasy skin and hair.

‘Masculine’ side-effects such as excessive bodily and facial hair and a deepened voice are also possible.

Testosterone pills aren’t given to women but can raise cholesterol, increasing the odds of heart attacks and strokes.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists urges caution when prescribing the libido-boosting treatment to women other than those who have had their ovaries removed.

It advises: ‘Testosterone replacement may be associated with adverse clinical and metabolic side effects and long-term consequences are unknown.

Written By: Fiona Macrae

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2028544/Jane-Fonda-reveals-testosterone-secret-sex-success-73.html#ixzz4cj0r8L4x

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Effects of taking tadalafil 5 mg once daily on erectile function and total testosterone levels in patients with metabolic syndrome.

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We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tadalafil 5 mg once-daily treatment on testosterone levels in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) accompanied by the metabolic syndrome. A total of 40 men with metabolic syndrome were evaluated for ED in this study. All the patients received 5 mg tadalafil once a day for 3 months. Erectile function was assessed using the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire. Serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone levels were also evaluated, and blood samples were taken between 08.00 and 10.00 in the fasting state. All participants have three or more criteria of metabolic syndrome. At the end of 3 months, mean testosterone values and IIEF scores showed an improvement from baseline values (from 3.6 ± 0.5 to 5.2 ± 0.3, from 11.3 ± 1.9 to 19 ± 0.8 respectively). After the treatment, serum LH levels were decreased (from 5.6 ± 0.6 to 4.6 ± 0.5). There was significantly difference in terms of baseline testosterone and luteinising hormone values and IIEF scores (p < .05). Based on our findings, we recommend tadalafil 5 mg once daily in those men with erectile dysfunction especially low testosterone levels accompanied by metabolic syndrome.

Article Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28295481

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