How to lose weight by having sex

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With more than half of the United States population on a diet, weight loss is clearly on our minds. But should you include sex in your weight management plan? We investigate.

A healthy weight is part and parcel of a healthy lifestyle. Keeping our pounds in check is good for our ticker, our bones, and our lungs. It might even keep cancer at bay, as we found out this week.

But a staggering 73.7 percent of men and 66.9 percent of women in the U.S. are overweight or obese. Perhaps it comes as no surprise, then, that 66 percent of us are currently on a diet.

Whether opting for a tried-and-tested Mediterranean diet or a relative newcomer, like intermittent fasting, as a nation we understand that our diet, our weight, and our health are intricately linked.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), “physical activity is an important part of maintaining healthy weight, losing weight, and keeping extra weight off once it has been lost.”

The HSS recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise every week, but less than 25 percent of adults manage to hit this target.

Where does sex fit into this?

Well, sex is good for our health, it burns calories, and it makes us happy. You are, of course, unlikely to burn as many calories between the sheets as during a heavy gym session, but exercise alone may not be the panacea for weight loss we give it credit for, according to a recent study.

So, get ready to look at the obvious and some of the more surprising reasons why sex should be firmly integrated into our plan to reach and maintain a healthy weight, regardless of whether you are a gym buff or not.

Sex is exercise

In 2013, Prof. Antony D. Karelis — along with colleagues from the Université du Québec à Montréal in Canada — studied exactly how many calories we burn when we get our groove on.

Prof. Karelis explains in his article in the journal PLOS ONE that only a handful of studies have attempted to shine the spotlight on the physiological effects during partnered sex with human subjects. All previous studies showed an increase in heart rate.

For his study, Prof. Karelis worked with 21 heterosexual couples, aged between 18 and 35.

The couples were asked to have sex once per week for a period of 4 weeks, while wearing an activity tracker that allowed the research team to calculate how much energy they spent each time.

A sexual encounter included foreplay, intercourse, and at least one orgasm by either partner, then “ended at the couple’s discretion,” as the authors explain.

Here is what the team found.

Men burned on average 101 calories and women 69 calories when they had sex. The average intensity was higher than walking but lower than jogging, Prof. Karelis explains, putting it firmly in the category of moderate-intensity exercise.

This means that each time we have sex, it counts toward our 150 minutes of weekly exercise recommended by the HSS.

If that’s not appealing enough, the data revealed more.

‘More pleasant’ than a gym workout

The range of calories burned during sex varied considerably. At the lower end, men burned 13 calories and women 11.6, while at the top of the range, men shifted 306 calories and women 164.

Let’s look at these numbers into the context of how long each sexual encounter lasted. While the average duration of foreplay, intercourse, and orgasm was 24.7 minutes, the actual time the couples spent having sex ranged from 12.5 to 36.9 minutes.

Whether the top calorie-burners had more vigorous sex or just took their sweet time isn’t clear from the data, but we can draw some conclusions. If we want to increase our calorie loss during sex, we can either get more actively involved, keep at it for longer, or a combination of both.

Prof. Karelis also compared sex with regular gym exercise. He found that men burned between 149 and 390 calories during a 30-minute, moderate-intensity session on the treadmill, while women burned between 120 and 381.

When asked to compare the two activites, all of the men and 95 percent of the women in the study said that sex was more pleasant than pounding the treadmill.

So, we are not only making considerable headway toward reaching our 150-minute weekly exercise goal when we have sex, we also stand to gain more pleasure than from a gym visit.

Exercise may not equal weight loss

While some may argue that a study on healthy, young individuals may not be representative of the general population, the participants included a wide spread of weight categories.

Body mass index (BMI) for men varied between 19.5 and 31, putting at least some of the men in the overweight and obese category. For women, the range was from 16.9 to 26.6, meaning some of the women were underweight and some were overweight.

The study doesn’t reveal anything about the participants’ weight during the 4 weeks they took part. But if you’re looking to shift some pounds, exercise alone may not be the answer to weight loss we once thought it was, as we reported last week.

Researchers from the University of Bangor in the United Kingdom found no discernible weight loss in women who had taken part in three sessions of circuit exercise training per week for either 4 or 8 weeks, despite burning around 3,400 calories in total during this time period.

On the contrary, the team identified changes in hormones that control appetite in overweight and obese study participants after exercise.

“[…] Someone undertaking more physical activity may experience increased appetite as a result,” senior study author Hans-Peter Kubis, Ph.D., explains.

Sex might fill a useful gap here because hormones released during our amorous experiences cause us to eat less.

Sex curbs food intake

The “love hormone” oxytocin is produced in the hypothalamus in our brain as well as in our gastrointestinal tract, and it has been accredited with key functions in sex, empathy, relationship-building, childbirth, and breast-feeding.

Oxytocin levels shoot up when we have sex – specifically, when we experience orgasm. But that’s not all the love hormone can do.

Dr. Elizabeth A. Lawson — from the Neuroendocrine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston — explains in an article in the December edition of Nature Reviews Endocrinology that “experiments in rodents, nonhuman primates and humans consistently show that oxytocin reduces caloric consumption.”

She adds that men ate fewer calories, particularly in the form of fat, after receiving 24 international units (IU) of oxytocin in a nasal spray in one study.

“The authors found that oxytocin reduced consumption of a postprandial snack, particularly chocolate cookies,” Dr. Lawson explains.

It’s important to note that oxytocin doesn’t stick around in our bodies for very long. Within 2–8 minutes of being released, half of hormone will be gone.

The after-effect of a single sexual encounter on our food intake will therefore only ever be transient. Still, every little helps, and a temporary curb on eating after sex is sure to contribute to overall weight loss.

Sex and weight management

Now that we’ve looked at the benefit of sex when it comes to burning calories and temporarily putting a halt on eating, how likely is it that we are going to lose weight by having sex?

That probably depends on how easy it is to incorporate sex into your personal schedule. Finding time to be romantic sounds easy, but the stark reality of busy lives make it less tenable for some.

However, it is worth reminding ourselves that sex has a plethora of health benefits, and, unlike a gym visit, you don’t have to stray far from your bedroom — or other location of personal preference — to make it happen.

So, if you are looking to shed a few pounds in the lead up to the peak holiday season, why not make the time to spend with your partner, enjoy sharing some intimate moments, and bask in the full effect that all that oxytocin and calorie loss will hopefully have on your scales.

You might find that your 2018 diet plan will easily accommodate sex as an indispensable component.

Written 

Article Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320235.php

 

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Oxytocin improves synchronization in leader-follower interaction

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A new study from Center for Music in the Brain, Denmark, shows that participants receiving oxytocin — a hormone known to promote social bonding — are more synchronized when finger-tapping together, than participants receiving placebo

When standing in a crowd at a concert, clapping hands along with the music on stage, it may be that people with higher levels of oxytocin are better synchronised with the beat of the music than those with lower levels of oxytocin.

A new study from Center for Music in the Brain (MIB) Aarhus University/The Royal Academy of Music, Denmark, published in Scientific Reports on the 8th of December 2016, shows that participants receiving oxytocin – a hormone known to promote social bonding – are more synchronized when finger-tapping together, than participants receiving placebo. This effect was observed when pairs of participants, placed in separate rooms tapped together in a leader/follower relationship.

When people synchronise their movements together, for example by walking in time, clapping or making music, they seem to like each other more and report feeling greater affiliation with each other. Oxytocin is a naturally occurring hormone that has been shown to promote social interaction, such as cooperation and affiliation. However, until now it has been unclear whether the social effect of oxytocin is a direct one, or whether oxytocin in fact primarily affects synchronisation and only secondarily social behaviours.

We set out to test these questions by measuring whether increased levels of oxytocin affected how pairs of participants synchronised together to a steady beat. One group of pairs received oxytocin through nasal spray, and another group received a placebo, also through nasal spray.

Our results indicate that oxytocin indeed affects synchronisation between participants but we did not find that oxytocin influenced how much tappers liked their tapping partners. The followers in the oxytocin group were less variable in their tapping to the beat suggesting that they were better at predicting the taps of their leaders. Thus oxytocin’s social effect may be explained by its role in facilitating prediction in interaction, even in the absence of subjectively experienced social affiliation.

The ability to synchronise to a musical beat is largely a human skill. Our study contributes to our understanding of how this form of human behaviour is affected by socio-biological factors, such as oxytocin and leader-follower relationships. It also highlights how music creates and maintains social cohesion in an evolutionary perspective.

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Facts:

  • Study design: double-blinded randomised control study (RCT)
  • Original article can be found at http://www.nature.com/articles/srep38416
  • Principal Investigators on the study were Assoc. Prof. Line Gebauer Ass. Prof. Maria Witek and Prof. Peter Vuust, Center for Music in the Brain (MIB), Dept. of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Denmark/The Royal Academy of Music Aarhus/Aalborg, Denmark. http://musicinthebrain.au.dk/

The study was performed in collaboration with Assoc. Prof. Ivana Konvalinka (DTU).

* The Danish National Research Foundation’s Center for Music In the Brain (MIB) is an interdisciplinary research center addressing the dual questions of how music is processed in the brain and how this can inform our understanding of fundamental principles behind brain processing in general. The center employs state-of-the-art scanning methods (MR, fMRI, MEG, EEG, PET) and behavioral measures.

MIB is a collaboration between Aarhus University (AU) and The Royal Academy of Music (RAMA) located at AU. With a strong foundation in music practice and theory at the highest level, and a focus on clinical application of music, MIB combines neuroscientific, musicological and psychological research in music perception, action, emotion and learning, with the potential to test the most prominent theories of brain function, and to influence the way we play, teach, use, and listen to music. http://dg.dk/en/centers-of-excellence-2/list-of-centers/

* External funding: The Danish National Research Foundation

Article Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-12/au-ois120916.php

 

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Tinnitus relief comes in form of the ‘love hormone’

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Oxytocin is often referred to as the love hormone because it promotes social connections, but new findings suggest it may also offer relief to those suffering from tinnitus. Brazilian researchers found that patients with tinnitus – ringing or buzzing in the ears – obtained relief by spraying oxytocin in their nose.

Lead researcher Dr. Andreia Azevedo said, “Oxytocin has actions in the brain and the ear that may help in tinnitus treatment and provide immediate relief.” Dr. Azevedo is unsure as to how oxytocin works to improve ringing in the ears but she speculates that it may affect the fluid regulation in the inner ear in addition to its effect on brain related to the production of dopamine.

Dr. Azevedo added, “For some patients, tinnitus disappeared or reached a non-distress level. As usual in tinnitus treatment, in some patients the tinnitus kept low, and for some it raised after drug therapy ended.”

At the moment, the effects of oxytocin are safe, but the long-term effects are unknown, so additional research is required. The researchers are working on larger dosage studies to see if the effects of love hormone could be prolonged.

Article Source: http://www.belmarrahealth.com/tinnitus-relief-comes-form-love-hormone/

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Oxytocin Enhances Spirituality, New Study Says

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Oxytocin has been dubbed the “love hormone” for its role promoting social bonding, altruism and more. Now new research from Duke University suggests the hormone may also support spirituality.

In the study, men reported a greater sense of spirituality shortly after taking oxytocin and a week later. Participants who took oxytocin also experienced more positive emotions during meditation, said lead author Patty Van Cappellen, a social psychologist at Duke.

“Spirituality and meditation have each been linked to health and well-being in previous research,” Van Cappellen said. “We were interested in understanding biological factors that may enhance those spiritual experiences.

“Oxytocin appears to be part of the way our bodies support spiritual beliefs.”

Study participants were all male, and the findings apply only to men, said Van Cappellen, associate director of the Interdisciplinary and Behavioral Research Center at Duke’s Social Science Research Institute. In general, oxytocin operates somewhat differently in men and women, Van Cappellen added. Oxytocin’s effects on women’s spirituality still needs to be investigated.

The results appears online in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience .

Oxytocin occurs naturally in the body. Produced by the hypothalamus, it acts as a hormone and as a neurotransmitter, affecting many regions of the brain. It is stimulated during sex, childbirth and breastfeeding. Recent research has highlighted oxytocin’s possible role in promoting empathy, trust, social bonding and altruism.

To test how oxytocin might influence spirituality, researchers administered the hormone to one group and a placebo to another. Those who received oxytocin were more likely to say afterwards that spirituality was important in their lives and that life has meaning and purpose. This was true after taking into account whether the participant reported belonging to an organized religion or not.

Participants who received oxytocin were also more inclined to view themselves as interconnected with other people and living things, giving higher ratings to statements such as “All life is interconnected” and “There is a higher plane of consciousness or spirituality that binds all people.”

Study subjects also participated in a guided meditation. Those who received oxytocin reported experiencing more positive emotions during meditation, including awe, gratitude, hope, inspiration, interest, love and serenity.

Oxytocin did not affect all participants equally, though. Its effect on spirituality was stronger among people with a particular variant of the CD38 gene, a gene that regulates the release of oxytocin from hypothalamic neurons in the brain.

Van Cappellen cautioned that the findings should not be over-generalized. First of all, there are many definitions of spirituality, she noted.

“Spirituality is complex and affected by many factors,” Van Cappellen said. “However, oxytocin does seem to affect how we perceive the world and what we believe.”

Explore further: Oxytocin helps people feel more extraverted

More information: Patty Van Cappellen et al. Effects of oxytocin administration on spirituality and emotional responses to meditation, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2016). DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsw078

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-09-oxytocin-spirituality.html

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Oxytocin nasal spray improves self-control in overweight men

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Boston, MA– A single dose of oxytocin nasal spray, known to reduce food intake, decreases impulsive behavior in overweight and obese men, according to a preliminary study to be presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society’s 98th annual meeting in Boston.

Oxytocin nasal spray (made by Novartis) is a synthetic version of the hormone oxytocin, which is important for controlling food intake and weight. It is approved in Europe but not in the United States other than in clinical trials. Oxytocin is available in the United States as an intravenous or injectable drug (Pitocin) to induce labor.

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital reported last year that oxytocin nasal spray reduced intake of calories and fat at a test meal without affecting appetite, but they were not sure how the drug has that affect. Results of their new pilot study in 10 overweight and obese men suggest that one way oxytocin lowers food intake might be by improving self-control, said co-investigator Franziska Plessow, PhD, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and a research fellow in the Neuroendocrine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

“Knowing the mechanisms of action of intranasal oxytocin is important to investigating oxytocin as a novel treatment strategy for obesity,” Plessow said. “This information may allow us to move forward to large clinical trials, identify who can benefit from the drug, and help optimize the treatment.”

To demonstrate the study subjects’ ability to suppress impulsive behavior, the investigators administered a psychology research test called the stop-signal task. In this test, the subject sat in front of a computer and became trained to respond to a square symbol on the computer screen by pressing a designated left button on the keyboard and to a triangle by pressing a right button. After the subject became familiar with that task, he was told to not press a button when he saw a symbol but heard a beep (the stop signal). Because the beep occurred after the symbols appeared with a varying delay that was adjusted to each subject, the new task required the subject to control the behavioral impulse to respond, Plessow explained.

Participants took the test on two occasions 15 minutes after they self-administered a dose of nasal spray in each nostril. In a randomly assigned order, one day they received oxytocin and another they received a placebo, or dummy drug. Neither participants nor the tester knew which treatment they received. The men ranged in age from 23 to 43 years and were overweight or obese (BMI ranging from 27.7-33.9 kg/m2).

The study, which received pilot grants from the National Institutes of Health-funded Boston Nutrition Obesity Research Center and Nutrition Obesity Research Center at Harvard, had exciting results, according to Plessow. After receiving oxytocin, participants less frequently pressed the button when they were not supposed to. This demonstrated that they were acting less impulsively and exerting more control over their behavior after receiving oxytocin, she said.

Plessow said more study is necessary to determine how oxytocin alters self-control and how important this mechanism is in regulating food intake since not all overeating relates to poor self-control. They also will need to test the drug in women.

“Our preliminary results in men are promising,” she said. “Oxytocin nasal spray showed no strong side effects and is not as invasive as obesity surgery.”

Article Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-04/tes-ons040116.php

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Bromances may be good for men’s health

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Male friendships, portrayed and often winked at in bromance movies, could have healthful effects similar to those seen in romantic relationships, especially when dealing with stress, according to a new study of male rats by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

Human studies show that social interactions increase the level of the hormone oxytocin in the brain, and that oxytocin helps people bond and socialize more, increasing their resilience in the face of stress and leading to longer, healthier lives. Studies of male-female rat pairs and other rodents, such as monogamous prairie voles, confirm these findings.

The new study extends these studies to male rats housed in the same cage, and demonstrates that mild stress can actually make male rats more social and cooperative than they are in an unstressed environment, much as humans come together after non-life-threatening events such as a national tragedy. After a mild stress, the rats showed increased brain levels of oxytocin and its receptor and huddled and touched more.

“A bromance can be a good thing,” said lead author Elizabeth Kirby, who started work on the study while a doctoral student at UC Berkeley and continued it after assuming a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford. “Males are getting a bad rap when you look at animal models of social interactions, because they are assumed to be instinctively aggressive. But even rats can have a good cuddle – essentially a male-male bromance – to help recover from a bad day.”

“Having friends is not un-masculine,” she added. “These rats are using their rat friendships to recover from what would otherwise be a negative experience. If rats can do it, men can do it too. And they definitely are, they just don’t get as much credit in the research for that.”

The new study, available online, will be published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Normal vs. traumatic stress

The research also has implications for post-traumatic stress disorder, said senior author Daniela Kaufer, a UC Berkeley associate professor of integrative biology and member of the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute.

After severe, potentially life-threatening stress, the male rat cagemates became withdrawn and antisocial, often sitting alone in a corner, and more aggressive, not unlike people who suffer from PTSD or illnesses such as depression or severe anxiety. The researchers found that oxytocin receptor levels in the brain actually decreased after severe stress, which would make the brain less responsive to whatever hormone is there.

“Social interactions can buffer you against stress, but if a trauma is just too much and there is PTSD, you actually withdraw from social interactions that can be supportive for you,” Kaufer said. “This research suggests that this might be happening through changes in oxytocin; that in the context of life-threatening stress, you lose its effect and you see less prosocial behavior. This really aligns well with what you see with pathological effects of stress on humans.”

The work supports attempts to treat PTSD with oxytocin nasal sprays as a way to encourage social interactions that could lead to recovery. Oxytocin may also help those suffering from PTSD replace traumatic memories with less traumatic memories, so-called fear extinction.

“We think oxytocin, which is released after stress, is a way of bringing people closer in times of acute stress, which leads to more sharing, bonding and potentially better fear extinction and an increase in cognitive health,” said first author Sandra Muroy, a UC Berkeley graduate student who launched the research while an undergraduate.

Kaufer and Kirby study the impact of stress on the brain, and previously showed that moderate stress primes the brain to better deal with subsequent stress, even stimulating the growth of new neurons to remember the stressful situation.

This research led them to study the effect of stress on social behavior, and how brain hormones and neural circuits are changed by stress to alter social dynamics. Kirby and Muroy focused over the past two years on male rats after noticing the effects of mild stress on cagemate interactions. They correlated these with oxytocin levels in the brain’s hypothalamus, because of oxytocin’s known role in social bonding, including male-female pair bonding and a mother’s bonding with a child.

Males huddle more after moderate stress

Male rats housed together, Kirby said, sometimes display aggression toward one another, such as fighting over water and food. But after a mild stress – in this experiment, restraining them for a few hours – they tended to cooperate more, despite or because of an even stronger dominance hierarchy between the rats.

“If you repeatedly take away and return their water, normal rats become very aggressive, pushing and shoving at the water fountain like a bunch of thirsty 7-year-olds who don’t know how to stand in line yet,” Kirby said. “The cagemates who had the mild stressor did not show this behavior at all. After taking away their water and bringing it back, they shared it very evenly and without any pushing and shoving. It was very civil.”

The researchers found that this was accompanied by increased hypothalamic oxytocin levels.

On the other hand, a severe stressor – in this case, adding the smell of fox urine while they were restrained – had the opposite effect.

“If you are a rat and you smell a predator, the likelihood that you are going to get eaten soon is pretty high,” Kirby said. “In that case, the oxytocin bump that would come with a less threatening stressor is suppressed, and oxytocin receptor levels decrease Then, you don’t see social bonding anymore. You don’t see the rodent cuddling, you don’t see them showing increased prosocial behaviors.”

This is akin to PTSD after a battle experience or a car accident, she said. “People stop talking to their friends, they stop engaging in their social networks the way they used to.”

“A tiny little difference in the reality of the experiment – the switch from a neutral odor to a predator odor – caused a major change in these animals’ behavior: they don’t have any of the prosocial bonding, they don’t share resources in a nice way, they don’t have a pronounced hierarchy, they don’t huddle or bond, and you start seeing aggression,” Kaufer added. “And when you look in the brain, they don’t have an increase in oxytocin gene expression or the hormone itself, and they have a decrease in the oxytocin receptor.”

These and other experiments, she said, demonstrate that stress should be seen less as a trial to survive than as a stimulus for greater social bonding and, by changing our day-to-day lives, a long-term benefit to mental health and increased stress resilience.

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The work was supported by a BRAINS innovator award from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health. Current UC Berkeley graduate student Kimberly Long is also an author of the paper.

Article Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-03/uoc–bmb030316.php

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Brain Health Benefits From An Active Sex Life, Which Causes High Dopamine, Oxytocin Levels

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There are plenty of ways to keep our brains active and healthy as we age. Eating leafy vegetables, doing crossword puzzles, and listening to music are among activities doctors recommend. Now, a recent study published in the journal Age and Ageing found that having an active sex life over age 50 can boost brain health, and eventually protect us from dementia.

There has been little focus on how having sex into old age affects cognition. Yet, we know sex influences the social, emotional, and physical aspects of our lives in general. Dr. Hayley Wright and Rebecca Jenks of Coventry University sought to examine the possible benefits of sex in old age.

The researchers analyzed over 6,800 participants between the ages of 50 and 89 to see how and if sex had any effect on the aging process. The participants were asked about their sex lives, including everything from masturbation to intercourse. A series of experiments were conducted to test the brain health of the participants.

In the first experiment, participants were asked to read a series of words, and then to remember them under two different circumstances — immediately after reciting them, and five minutes after hearing them. The second experiment included a number sequencing exercise where participants were given a specific pattern of numbers, and then asked to recall which digit was missing (e.g. 1, 2, __, 4). The researchers took into account age, education, wealth, levels of physical activity, cohabiting status, general health, depression, loneliness, and quality of life when it came to factors that could influence sexual activity or cognition.

The findings revealed those with active sex lives were more likely to accurately recall both the word and number tests than were those who reported being sexually inactive. Men fared better than women on some aspects of the testing too. Sexually active men showed a higher difference in score on both tests than sexually active women did. These women did show a significant improvement in word recall, but not the number sequencing test.

So, how is being sexually active good for the brain?

The researchers speculate that sex increases levels of the feel-good hormones dopamine and oxytocin in the brain. These brain chemicals may be vital to brain function through “improving signaling or connectivity between brain regions,” Weight told AARP. This could offer insight as to why those in healthy committed relationships have better brain health.

The disparity between how well men and women performed on the experiments could be attributed to sex-specific hormones. These hormones circulate within our bodies before we are even born, and can actually impact brain development and cognitive function throughout our lifetime. Previous studies suggest hormonal differences in men and women lead them to use different parts of the brain to encode memories, sense emotions, recognize faces, solve certain problems, and make decisions.

“Whilst our research is not concerned with how men and women `think’ about sex in a conscious sense, it is possible that our results may be related to hormones which affect the brain — and hence cognitive functions — in men and women differently, at a subconscious level,” Wright told Reuters Health.

Most research related to sex and cognitive function has solely focused on men. A 2000 study found healthy older Italian men over 65, who were still interested in sex and were sexually active, had better cognitive function than those who were not. The lack of research with women in this area could be because they are more likely to be widowed at an earlier age than men.

Overall, Wright’s and Jenks’ study does prompt further research when it comes to preventing age-related cognitive decline. There’s plenty of lifestyle factors that promote or protect cognitive functions, especially memory, in old age. With about 44 million people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia, sex could be beneficial to our overall mental health.

Sources: Wright H and Jenks RA. Sex on the brain! Associations between sexual activity and cognitive function in older age. Age and Ageing. 2016.

Padoani W, Dello Buono M, Marietta P et al. Influence of Cognitive Status on the Sexual Life of 352 Elderly Italians Aged 65–105 Years. Gerontology. 2000.

Article Source: http://www.medicaldaily.com/brain-health-health-benefits-sex-life-375286

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