Shift Work Throws Urologic Health Off Schedule

Leave a comment

Nonstandard shifts and a circadian rhythm disturbance known as shift work sleep disorder contribute to a significant increase in urinary tract symptoms and reproductive problems, according to three studies conducted at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

“A 45-year-old shift worker with shift work sleep disorder might look like a 75-year-old man in terms of his lower urinary tract symptoms,” John Sigalos, a medical student and investigator on one of the studies, said here at the American Urological Association 2017 Annual Meeting.

The other studies presented demonstrate that male shift workers with shift work sleep disorder have lower testosterone levels and more hypogonadal symptoms than daytime workers, and that infertile shift workers, especially those who work rotating shifts, have significantly worse semen parameters than infertile men who work the day shift.

In the United States, approximately 15% of the labor force works late-night or rotating shifts.

Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Study

To determine the effect of poor sleep quality and shift work on lower urinary tract symptoms, Sigalos and his colleagues retrospectively reviewed the medical records of men treated at the Baylor andrology clinic from 2014 to 2016.

All the men had completed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) to evaluate lower urinary tract symptoms, completed questionnaires about work schedules and sleep disorders, and had blood samples taken.

Of the 2487 participants, 766 (30.8%) reported working nonstandard shifts in the previous month and, of these, 36.8% were considered to be at high risk for sleep disorders.

Mean IPSS score was higher in shift workers with sleep disorders than in shift workers without, and daytime workers (7.77 vs 5.37 vs 6.84; P < .0001 between all groups).

IPSS scores were 3.1 points lower in shift workers with sleep disorders than in shift workers without, after age, comorbidities, and testosterone levels were controlled for (= .0001).

These findings suggest that poor sleep quality — rather than shift work itself — contributes to the increase in lower urinary tract symptoms. Patients at risk for shift work sleep disorder should be screened for lower urinary tract symptoms and counseled about the risk, Sigalos told Medscape Medical News.

Hypogonadism Study

The potential for hypogonadal symptoms and sexual dysfunction was examined by another group of Baylor investigators who used the same cohort of men.

On multivariable analyses that controlled for age, Charlson comorbidity score, and testosterone levels, mean scores on the quantitative Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (qADAM) questionnaire were 0.8 points lower in nonstandard shift workers than in daytime workers (P < .01). And mean qADAM score was 3.9 points lower in shift workers at high risk for sleep disorders than in shift workers at low risk (P < .01).

In addition, there was an independent association between high risk for shift work sleep disorder and lower testosterone levels after age, comorbidities, and history of testosterone supplementation were controlled for (P < .01).

Semen Parameters Study

The effects of shift work and sleep quality on semen parameters and reproductive hormones in men were assessed in a prospective study by Taylor Kohn, MD, and his colleagues.

The study participants — 75 infertile shift workers, 96 infertile nonshift workers, and a control group of 26 fertile men — completed questionnaires about shift work and sleep quality, and underwent semen analysis and hormone testing.

Sperm density was significantly lower in infertile shift workers than in infertile nonshift workers (P = .012), as were total motile counts (P = .019) and testosterone levels (= .026).

However, the differences in sperm motility, forward progression measures, luteinizing hormone levels, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were not significant.

All semen parameters were significantly lower in the infertile shift workers than in the fertile control group, and luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were significantly higher. Testosterone levels were about the same in the two groups.

On linear regression that controlled for age, Charlson comorbidity index, tobacco use, and average income, there was a significant negative association between total motile count and shift work (P = .039), and a significant positive association between total motile count and previous fertility (P = .041).

In addition, total motile counts were significantly lower in men who worked rotating shifts than in those who worked fixed shifts (P < .05).

The type of job shift workers performed also made a difference. Men who performed physical labor in environments where chemical use was common (such as oil fields and refineries) had significantly lower total motile counts than physical laborers without chemical exposure, medical workers, white-collar workers, and first responders (P < .05).

Sleep satisfaction also seemed to play a role. “When assessing reported overall sleep amounts in the previous month, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone levels trended downward as men became more unsatisfied with the amount of sleep they were getting,” Dr Kohn reported.

Thinking Beyond the Prostate

It is important for urologists to think beyond the prostate when treating men with lower urinary tract symptoms or sexual dysfunction, said Howard Adler, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine at the Stony Brook University School of Medicine in New York.

When men present with symptoms like those reported in these studies, clinicians need to consider not only prostate-related symptoms, but also age-related changes in bladder function, renal function, and other medical conditions, such as diabetes, he told Medscape Medical News.

At Stony Brook, Dr Adler explained, he and his colleagues have begun “asking patients about sleep habits and snoring, and are sending them for sleep studies to see if they have apnea or something else, especially patients with a lot of night-time urination.”

The studies were supported by the Baylor College of Medicine. The authors and Dr Adler have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

American Urological Association (AUA) 2017 Annual Meeting: Abstracts MP13-12 and PD13-08 presented May 12, 2017; Abstract MP91-06 presented May 16, 2017.

Written By: Neil Osterweil

Article Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/880096#vp_1

 

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Advertisements

Benefits of Sermorelin w/GHRP2 in the First Six Months

Leave a comment

Sermorelin and GHRP2 both stimulate the patient’s own pituitary gland by binding to specific receptors that increase production and secretion of endogenous Human Growth Hormone (HGH).  GHRP2 also acts as an appetite suppressant allowing for increased weight loss.

First Month

Weight loss/Body fat reduction

Vivid dreams

Better, sounder sleep

Improved stamina

Optimistic attitude

 

Second Month 

Improved muscle tone

Increased strength

Improved skin tone

Improved nail growth

Better digestion

Weight loss/Body fat reduction

Improved vision

Enhanced sexual function

 

Third Month

Improved mental process

Enhanced productivity

Faster wound healing

Hair re-growth

Increased libido

Increased muscle size

Faster recovery from muscle soreness

Reduced PMS symptoms

Greater body flexibility

Reduced pain

 

Fourth Month

Heightened improvements with all of the above

At times improvements may seem to diminish or plateau

Rejuvenation is still a process. Benefits should resume with continued improvements

 

Fifth Month

Improved weight loss and reduction of inches

Improved skin texture and appearance

Skin thickening and greater elasticity

Reduction of skin wrinkles

Thickening of hair with a shiny, healthy appearance

Continuation of improved muscle tone

 

Sixth Month

Diminished cellulite

Improved resistance to colds, flu and other illnesses

Improved eyesight

Healing of old wounds

Disappearance of pain and soreness

Improved body contour

 

Contact us today for more information on Sermorelin/ghrps

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Break for BP

Leave a comment

A midday nap may help to lower blood pressure, among hypertensive men and women.

In today’s 24/7/365 society, few of us take time to tend to our health and well-being; a midday nap may seem completely elusive.  Manolis Kallistratos, from Asklepieion Voula General Hospital (Greece), and colleagues assessed the effect of midday sleep on blood pressure among a group of 386 men and women, average age 61.4 years), with arterial hypertension.  The team collected these measurements for all subjects: midday sleep time (in minutes), office blood pressure, 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, lifestyle habits, body mass index (BMI) and a complete echocardiographic evaluation including left atrial size. After adjusting for confounding factors, the researchers found that midday sleepers had 5% lower average 24 hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (by 6 mmHg), as compared to patients who did not sleep at all midday. Their average systolic blood pressure readings were 4% lower when they were awake (by 5 mmHg) and 6% lower while they slept at night (by 7 mmHg), as compared to non-midday sleepers.  As well, in midday sleepers pulse wave velocity levels were 11% lower and left atrium diameter was 5% smaller. The lead investigator comments that: “midday naps seem to lower blood pressure levels and may probably also decrease the number of required antihypertensive medications.”

Article Source: http://www.worldhealth.net/news/break-bp/

 

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

http://www.BostonTestosterone.com

http://www.BTPWellness.com

http://www.facebook.com/BostonTestosterone
855-617-MEDS (6337)

Blue light has a dark side

Leave a comment

Exposure to blue light at night, emitted by electronics and energy-efficient lightbulbs, harmful to your health.

Until the advent of artificial lighting, the sun was the major source of lighting, and people spent their evenings in (relative) darkness. Now, in much of the world, evenings are illuminated, and we take our easy access to all those lumens pretty much for granted.

But we may be paying a price for basking in all that light. At night, light throws the body’s biological clock—the circadian rhythm—out of whack. Sleep suffers. Worse, research shows that it may contribute to the causation of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

But not all colors of light have the same effect. Blue wavelengths—which are beneficial during daylight hours because they boost attention, reaction times, and mood—seem to be the most disruptive at night. And the proliferation of electronics with screens, as well as energy-efficient lighting, is increasing our exposure to blue wavelengths, especially after sundown.

Daily rhythms influenced by light

Everyone has slightly different circadian rhythms, but the average length is 24 and one-quarter hours. The circadian rhythm of people who stay up late is slightly longer, while the rhythms of earlier birds fall short of 24 hours. Dr. Charles Czeisler of Harvard Medical School showed, in 1981, that daylight keeps a person’s internal clock aligned with the environment.

The health risks of nighttime light

Study after study has linked working the night shift and exposure to light at night to several types of cancer (breast, prostate), diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. It’s not exactly clear why nighttime light exposure seems to be so bad for us. But we do know that exposure to light suppresses the secretion of melatonin, a hormone that influences circadian rhythms, and there’s some experimental evidence (it’s very preliminary) that lower melatonin levels might explain the association with cancer.

A Harvard study shed a little bit of light on the possible connection to diabetes and possibly obesity. The researchers put 10 people on a schedule that gradually shifted the timing of their circadian rhythms. Their blood sugar levels increased, throwing them into a prediabetic state, and levels of leptin, a hormone that leaves people feeling full after a meal, went down.

Even dim light can interfere with a person’s circadian rhythm and melatonin secretion. A mere eight lux—a level of brightness exceeded by most table lamps and about twice that of a night light—has an effect, notes Stephen Lockley, a Harvard sleep researcher. Light at night is part of the reason so many people don’t get enough sleep, says Lockley, and researchers have linked short sleep to increased risk for depression, as well as diabetes and cardiovascular problems.

The power of the blues

While light of any kind can suppress the secretion of melatonin, blue light at night does so more powerfully. Harvard researchers and their colleagues conducted an experiment comparing the effects of 6.5 hours of exposure to blue light to exposure to green light of comparable brightness. The blue light suppressed melatonin for about twice as long as the green light and shifted circadian rhythms by twice as much (3 hours vs. 1.5 hours).

In another study of blue light, researchers at the University of Toronto compared the melatonin levels of people exposed to bright indoor light who were wearing blue-light–blocking goggles to people exposed to regular dim light without wearing goggles. The fact that the levels of the hormone were about the same in the two groups strengthens the hypothesis that blue light is a potent suppressor of melatonin. It also suggests that shift workers and night owls could perhaps protect themselves if they wore eyewear that blocks blue light. Inexpensive sunglasses with orange-tinted lenses block blue light, but they also block other colors, so they’re not suitable for use indoors at night. Glasses that block out only blue light can cost up to $80.

Less-blue light

If blue light does have adverse health effects, then environmental concerns, and the quest for energy-efficient lighting, could be at odds with personal health. Those curlicue compact fluorescent lightbulbs and LED lights are much more energy-efficient than the old-fashioned incandescent lightbulbs we grew up with. But they also tend to produce more blue light.

The physics of fluorescent lights can’t be changed, but coatings inside the bulbs can be so they produce a warmer, less blue light. LED lights are more efficient than fluorescent lights, but they also produce a fair amount of light in the blue spectrum. Richard Hansler, a light researcher at John Carroll University in Cleveland, notes that ordinary incandescent lights also produce some blue light, although less than most fluorescent lightbulbs.

What you can do

  • Use dim red lights for night lights. Red light has the least power to shift circadian rhythm and suppress melatonin.
  • Avoid looking at bright screens beginning two to three hours before bed.
  • If you work a night shift or use a lot of electronic devices at night, consider wearing blue-blocking glasses or installing an app that filters the blue/green wavelength at night.
  • Expose yourself to lots of bright light during the day, which will boost your ability to sleep at night, as well as your mood and alertness during daylight.

image: © Innovatedcaptures | Dreamstime.com

Updated: September 2, 2015

Originally published: May 2012

Article Source: http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side?

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Progesterone: A Key Ingredient for Optimal Health

Leave a comment

There seems to be a common misconception among physicians and patients that all hormones are the same.  Of course,   this is not true, but it shows the pharmaceutical propaganda machine is working. The basic difference between chemical   hormones and natural hormones is that one has side-effects and the other does not. This is because side-effects are a   property of drugs not foods. Consequently, it follows that hormones obtained from natural food sources, also known as   “bio-identical hormones,” do not have the same negative effects associated with synthetic hormone drug products.

The most common prescription hormone drugs include various forms of estrogen and progestin, a synthetic progesterone   that acts more like estrogen than progesterone. Female patients are typically prescribed these synthetic hormone drugs to   help with their menstrual cycle or menopause. In general, estrogen has a very broad physiological role for males as well   as females. The effects of estrogen include, but are not limited to, the following: water retention, aging, stress, memory   loss, hypoglycemia, increased fat, hypothyroidism, miscarriage, infertility, uterine fibroids, blood clotting, vascular spasm,   increased cholesterol, gall bladder disease, and cancer.

The main cause of hormone-related health problems in women is not due to the absolute deficiency of estrogen or   progesterone but rather the relative dominance of estrogen and relative deficiency of progesterone. For this reason,   hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with estrogen alone without an opposing progesterone, such as the prescription   drug Premarin, should be avoided. This chemicalized hormonal substitute differs from the natural estrogen in one’s body   and contributes to increased estrogen. Increased estrogen, in turn, increases the risk of DNA damage, cancer (e.g.,   endometrial, breast cancer, etc.), and estrogen dominance. Other contributing factors to excess estrogen include adrenal   fatigue, environmental estrogen, obesity, stress, poor diet, and lack of exercise.

Estrogen excess may result in such common maladies as depression, weight gain insomnia, anxiety, blood sugar   imbalance, migraine headaches, and chronic fatigue due to adrenal gland exhaustion. Moreover, stress can result not   only in adrenal gland exhaustion, but reduced progesterone output and increased estrogen production. A further reduction   in progesterone output contributes to all the problems associated estrogen dominance (“Acute stress persistently   enhances estrogen levels in the female rat,” Shors et al., Stress. 3(2):163-71, 1999

Interestingly, nature has provided us with progesterone, which acts as an antagonist to estrogen. For example, estrogen   stimulates breast cysts while progesterone protects against breast cysts. Estrogen enhances salt and water retention   while progesterone is a natural diuretic. Estrogen is associated with breast and endometrial cancers, while progesterone   has a cancer preventive effect. In fact, studies have shown that premenopausal women deficient in progesterone had 5.4   times the risk of breast cancer compared to healthy women (“Breast cancer incidence in women with a history of   progesterone deficiency,” Cowan et al., Am J Epidemiol, 114(2):209-17, Aug 1981).

Here are some answers to frequently asked questions that patients have about progesterone:

1. Is progesterone supplementation safe? Yes. No side effects have been attributed to natural progesterone in either   the scientific or medical literature. While large doses of estrogen have been found to destroy certain areas of the   adrenal cortex, large doses of progesterone have been shown to have anti-stress effects without harming the   adrenals.

2. Should I take progesterone if I’m pregnant? A “Medical News” item in a 1976 issue of JAMA reports a study   showing that progesterone probably plays a critical role in preventing rejection of the fetus by the mother. Its use   before and during pregnancy is also associated with a reduced incidence of birth defects.  Studies in animals have   also shown that prenatal progesterone increases brain size, which is associated with a long life.  Conversely, excess   estrogen reduces brain size and damages behavior, which may, in turn, adversely affect a subsequent generation   (“The Epigenetics of Sex Differences in the Brain,” McCarthy et al.J Neurosci. 2009 Oct 14; 29(41):12815–12823).

3. Can I use progesterone for weight loss? Yes. The primary reasons for using progesterone for weight loss purposes   are to decrease the effects of insulin and adrenaline. This is because insulin transports sugar into the fat tissue for   storage which, in turn, stimulates the release of adrenaline to raise sugar levels again creating a positive feedback   loop. Consequently, as the episodes of hypoglycemia decrease the production of adrenaline to counteract   hypoglycemia also decreases. Decreased adrenaline means that less sugar is produced, less insulin is needed for   storing sugar as fat, and thus, more weight can be lost.

4. Does progesterone help with insomnia? Yes. Progesterone, which is most highly concentrated in the brain tissue,   increases GABA production in the brain which, in turn, promotes sleep.

5. What is the recommended daily dosage of progesterone? The physiologic dose of progesterone for the non-  pregnant female is 10-50 mg/day and 10 mg/day in the post-menopausal female. Pregnenolone, a precursor to   progesterone, may be taken as anywhere from 30-150 mg/day for women whereas the physiologic of pregnenolone   for a man is 5-10 mg/day. In general, the best time to use progesterone for weight loss is 1-3 minutes before eating.

by Daniel F. Royal, DO, HMD, JD Owner of the Royal Medical Clinic, Henderson, NV

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Five steps for Better Sleep 

Leave a comment

  1. Count your victories. As you close your eyes, review your day, choosing to focus your attention on all the things that went well for you. This is a great exercise to help you stay more positive, develop self-awareness and self-esteem.
  2. Use affirmations. Place a smile on your face, to express gratitude. Then repeat 3 times silently to yourself:  “May I have a peaceful, restful night” then add  “Thank you.”
  3. Scan your body. Relax your body, release all tensions.  Start by noticing the presence of your head on the pillow, then your shoulders, your arms, hands, spine back hips, buttocks, legs and feet.
  4. Become aware of your breath. Notice your breath coming in and going out. Notice the air tickling your nostrils, feeling cool on the way in and warm on the way out.  Breathe in deeply, letting the belly rise and breathe out slowly releasing restlessness and any resistance to relaxation.
  5. Picture a starlit sky.   Let your breath dissolve into space and imagine floating in a starlit sky. Take your bed with you if you want. As you float amidst the millions of stars that fill the sky, surrender to the benevolence of the night.

 We hope this helps any of you who are having a difficult time sleep

from Edwige Gilbert,  Life Coach

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Sleep loss lowers testosterone in healthy young men

Leave a comment

Cutting back on sleep drastically reduces a healthy young man’s testosterone levels, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Eve Van Cauter, PhD, professor in medicine and director of the study, found that men who slept less than five hours a night for one week in a laboratory had significantly lower levels of testosterone than when they had a full night’s sleep. Low testosterone has a host of negative consequences for young men, and not just in sexual behavior and reproduction. It is critical in building strength and muscle mass, and bone density.

“Low testosterone levels are associated with reduced well being and vigor, which may also occur as a consequence of sleep loss” said Van Cauter.

At least 15% of the adult working population in the US gets less than 5 hours of sleep a night, and suffers many adverse health effects because of it. This study found that skipping sleep reduces a young man’s testosterone levels by the same amount as aging 10 to 15 years.

“As research progresses, low sleep duration and poor sleep quality are increasingly recognized as endocrine disruptors,” Van Cauter said.

The ten young men in the study were recruited from around the University of Chicago campus. They passed a rigorous battery of tests to screen for endocrine or psychiatric disorders and sleep problems. They were an average of 24 years old, lean and in good health.

For the study, they spent three nights in the laboratory sleeping for up to ten hours, and then eight nights sleeping less than five hours. Their blood was sampled every 15 to 30 minutes for 24 hours during the last day of the ten-hour sleep phase and the last day of the five-hour sleep phase.

The effects of sleep loss on testosterone levels were apparent after just one week of short sleep. Five hours of sleep decreased their testosterone levels by 10% to 15%. The young men had the lowest testosterone levels in the afternoons on their sleep restricted days, between 2 pm and 10 pm.

The young men also self-reported their mood and vigor levels throughout the study. They reported a decline in their sense of well-being as their blood testosterone levels declined. Their mood and vigor fell more every day as the sleep restriction part of the study progressed.

Testosterone levels in men decline by 1% to 2% a year as they age. Testosterone deficiency is associated with low energy, reduced libido, poor concentration, and fatigue.

Article Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-05/uocm-sll053111.php

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠

Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine

Older Entries