Safety of Testosterone Therapy & Clueless Primary Care Physicians

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Boston, MA – Testosterone replacement therapy for hypogonadal men has been used for decades. However, there are still scores of primary care doctors spreading irresponsible misinformation regarding the safety of this treatment, particularly to elderly men who can benefit mightily from a balanced hormonal health.

A study was done with 255 men with an Average age of 60.6 ± 8.0 years, with testosterone levels between ≤ 3.5 ng/ml. They received parenteral (injectable) testosterone undecanoate.

After more than five years of monitored testosterone therapy, the study noted that a mere 3 out of 255 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer.  The study stated that “3/255 patients with prostate cancer does not suggest an increased risk of prostate cancer in elderly men on long-term testosterone treatment.  Long-term treatment with testosterone undecanoate with monitoring according to the guidelines is acceptably safe.”

Now, according to cancer.org, “About 1 man in 6 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime.”  They also stated, “Prostate cancer can be a serious disease, but most men diagnosed with prostate cancer do not die from it.  In fact, more than 2.5 million men in the United States who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point are still alive today.”

In over 50 years of studies and research, there has never been a connection between testosterone levels in men and prostate cancer growth.  Moreover, a study from Harvard Medical School in 2006 concluded, “there is not now, nor has there ever been a scientific basis for the belief that testosterone causes prostate cancer to grow.”

Just more evidence that testosterone replacement therapy does not cause cancer or prostate cancer.  We can’t explain why leagues of completely clueless primary care doctors still spread baseless accusations that TRT is unsafe.

http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/ProstateCa … statistics

Boston Testosterone is a Testosterone Replacement, Wellness and Preventative Medicine Medical Center that treats and prevents the signs and symptoms associated with Andropause and hormone imbalances.  With affiliates nationally, Boston Testosterone offers hormone replacement therapy, weight loss protocols, erectile dysfunction (ED), Sermorelin-GHRP2 therapy and neutraceutical injectable therapies for men and women.  Their medical facilities offer physician examinations and treatment programs that incorporate the latest in medical science.

“The Greatest Health of Your Life” ℠

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See:  Side-Effect Profile of Long-Term Treatment of Elderly Hypogonadal Men with Testosterone Undecanoate  – Farid Saad, Ahmad Haider, Gheorghe Doros, Louis Gooren. Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany; Gulf Medical University School of Medicine, Ajman, United Arab Emirates; Private Practice, Bremerhaven, Germany; Public School of Health, Boston University, Boston, MA; VUMC Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Boston Men Show Decline in Testosterone (Male Hormone) Levels

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A recently published study confirms what has been suspected for some time, which is that men in the Boston area over the past two decades are showing declining levels of testosterone (male hormone), in their blood. Over twenty years the average testosterone level in these men dropped from 501 to 391. Many experts regard a testosterone lower than 300 to be abnormally low and possibly needing testosterone replacement treatment. One of the scientists on the study, Dr. Thomas Travison states that when comparing testosterone levels in Boston men from 1987 to 2005 a decline in the testosterone level in every adult age group was found over this time. The researcher stated that the speed with which the levels of male hormone declined over the twenty years and the uniformity of the decline in all age groups was cause for concern.

It is known that testosterone levels decline slowly as men age. Declining male hormone levels were found even in the 45 to 71 year age range, however. Other known causes of declining testosterone levels, the growing incidence of obesity and sedentary life style in Boston men, did not explain the findings, say the researchers.

Could other factors be at work here? Alcohol has a powerful effect on male hormone levels for many reasons. Some alcohol products like bourbon and beer may have estrogen (female hormone) like plant products in them. Liver disease from excess alcohol consumption can also reduce the level of male hormone. Other drugs may have a negative effect on male hormone production such as cannabis (marijuana, Mary Jane, pot, herb, weed, splif, ganja, the bomb, the shit etc.). Although not nearly as wide spread in its use are the opiate type drugs, heroine, methadone, opium, codeine, hydrocodone etc. which can severely depress male hormone levels.

Environmental pollutants are known to cause adverse hormonal effects in men. Pollutants such as PCB’s and DDT act like female hormone and could reduce a man’s testicular function (the testicle is the site of testosterone and sperm production in men). Even herbal products can have anti-male hormone effect such as soy, black cohosh, and white clover. Perhaps the Boston men are being exposed to these influences more now then in the past and the result is sinking male hormone levels.

Before concluding that Boston men are simply pot smoking, beer drinking, soy eating effeminate couch potatoes, the authors of the recent study call for additional research into the possible origins of this serious loss of virility hormone in the Boston area.

Gary Pepper M.D.

For more information on our unique Men’s Testosterone and Wellness therapies visit us athttp://www.BostonTestosterone.com or http://www.Facebook.com/BostonTestosterone.

“The Greatest Health of Your Life”℠
Boston Testosterone Partners
National Testosterone Restoration for Men
Wellness & Preventative Medicine
http://www.BostonTestosterone.com
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855-617-MEDS (6337)

Testosterone; Male or Female you need it!

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We don’t have to be miserable as we age like many want us to believe.  Find out where your levels are and get them balanced.

Testosterone; Male or Female you need it! 

by: Michelle LeSueur

 

It is amazing how many people are suffering from low testosterone.   What is concerning is how young they are both male and female. Many are in their 20′s and early 30′s. So I decided that I would write on this in hopes to enlighten people and give them a direction.

When you talk about testosterone we tend to think that it is a male hormone.  Testosterone is considered a male hormone but both men and women have it.  For men it is primarily produced in the testes, women only make one tenth of what men do and it is made in smaller amounts in the ovaries.  Both male and female produce smaller amounts in the adrenal glands.  Testosterone is the main component when it comes to a sex drive for both men and women.

Many people believe that low testosterone only affects older men but,  According to the FDA, more than 4 million men suffer from low testosterone levels.  Yet, 95 out of 100 men fail to seek treatment.  Many believe that low hormone levels are just a part of getting older.  What men and women don’t realize is if you replace your hormones with Bio-identical natural hormones you don’t have to age!!

Research shows that by the time we get to 70 and 80 there is an increased risk of obesity, brittle bones, muscle loss, impotence and you are at higher risk for a heart attack, because of low testosterone.  When women finish menopause, they usually have low testosterone levels and it can be even worse for those using synthetic estrogen replacement.  Many find they have no energy, muscle tone or libido.  Testosterone increases the metabolic functions, which contribute to faster healing and lower total body fat.

If you are training and working to build muscle and shed fat, you need healthy testosterone levels.  One of the first things many notice when their levels start to drop is midsection weight.  Once levels have been restored many find that they are able to lose that unwanted belly fat.

When we are born we have so many fat cells.  At puberty and for women, pregnancy are two times in your life that you can actually increase the amount of fat cells you have.  Once you have increased fat cells you can never get rid of them.  You are able to shrink them, but never get rid of them.  These fat cells can expand mach larger than what they were originally if we over eat and need to store more and more fat.  But again, you can shrink them.  Hormones affect fat cells in two different ways, depending on the message they get.  A lipolytic or beta hormone tells the body to in crease fat burning energy and lipogenic or alpha hormones tell the body to store fat.  In different parts of our bodies we have alpha or beta-receptors and that is why it is easier to lose weight in some areas over others.  The name of the game is for our fat cells to have more beta-receptors than alpha.  By increasing testosterone, we increase beta-receptors. I have seen men with high cholesterol levels drop into normal range after they started replacing their testosterone.

Testosterone is necessary for sperm to mature and contributes to the overall quality of the sperm.  In the last 15 years male infertility is on the rise.  But here is the problem; it takes 3 months for sperm to develop verses one cycle with women, so male infertility is more of a problem than when a woman has fertility issues.  There is a lot of research that supports that we are seeing a rise in this because of all the estrogen’s in our environment.  You can find out more about environmental factors in the book, “Willing to Change! Can You Beat Genetics”.

So what are the symptoms of low testosterone?

Here is a little test to take, if you think you may have low levels.   The Saint Louis University Androgen Deficiency in Aging Men (ADAM) Questionnaire. Dr. John Morley, a researcher with the Saint Louis University School of Medicine, developed the self-screening tool to help identify symptoms of low testosterone in men. Choose the responses below that best describe how you have been feeling.

1. Do you have a decrease in libido (sex drive)?

2. Do you have a lack of energy?

3. Do you have a decrease in strength and/or endurance?

4. Have you lost height?

5. Have you noticed a decreased “enjoyment of life”?

6. Are you sad and/or grumpy?

7. (MEN) No longer wake up with a morning erection?

8. (MEN) Are your erections less strong?

9. Have you noticed a deterioration in your ability to play sports?

10. Are you falling asleep after dinner?

11. Has there been a recent deterioration in your work performance?

12 Do you have a hard time sleeping through the night?

13. (WOMEN) Do you have a hard time getting aroused?

If you answer yes to question one or seven, or at least three of the other questions you may have low testosterone levels.

What is the side affects from low testosterone?

Increased body fat, Gyneomastia, Weak erections, Loss of muscle mass, Lack of libido, Lack of motivation, depression, memory loss, irritability, low self esteem, heart disease, diabetes, Hypertension, Osteoporosis, and even premature death.  We need our hormones!!

We don’t have to be miserable as we age like many want us to believe.  Find out where your levels are and get them balanced.

For more information and appointments, please contact Clinic Director Charlie Blaisdell at CBlaisdell@CoreNewEngland.com

BTP/CORE New England
www.BostonTestosterone.com
CBlaisdell@CORENewEngland.com
Clinic: 781-269-5953
Direct: 617-869-796

Testosterone, Sleep And Sexual Health

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When it comes to sleep, testosterone may be the somewhat forgotten hormone. We know a great deal about the importance of testosterone as the male sex hormone, its role in the body and the effects of testosterone deficits, particularly for men. But there’s been relatively little attention paid to the effects of testosterone on sleep, for both men and women. A recent review of research seeks to bring some much-needed attention to the role that testosterone plays in sleep.

  • The effects of sleep (and lack of sleep) on testosterone levels in men and women.
  • The role that testosterone plays in obstructive sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing.
  • The relationship between testosterone levels and sexual dysfunction, and how sleep may affect both.

Changes in testosterone levels occur naturally during sleep, both in men and women. Testosterone levels rise during sleep and decrease during waking hours. Research has shown that the highest levels of testosterone happen during REM sleep, the deep, restorative sleep that occurs mostly late in the nightly sleep cycle. Sleep disorders, including interrupted sleep and lack of sleep, reduces the amount of REM sleep and will frequently lead to low testosterone levels. And this is important for men and women.

There’s strong evidence of a relationship between testosterone and sleep disordered breathing, including obstructive sleep apnea. Studies have shown that low testosterone levels frequently occur in men with obstructive sleep apnea. Men with obstructive sleep apnea are also more likely to suffer from complications to their sexual function, including low libido, erectile dysfunction and impotence.

  • Men with erectile dysfunction were more than twice as likely to have obstructive sleep apnea as those without erectile dysfunction, according to one study. This study also showed that the more serious a man’s erectile dysfunction, the more likely he was to also have obstructive sleep apnea.
  • Another study showed that men with obstructive sleep apnea and erectile dysfunction also exhibited highly-fragmented sleep that reduced or eliminated their REM sleep.

Men are more likely than women to suffer from sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing — though there is widespread belief that sleep apnea in women remains significantly under-diagnosed — and testosterone deficiencies may play a role.

What does this mean for men suffering from sleep problems or problems with sexual function? It’s time to explore the connection between the two. First off, guys, you’ve got to go to the doctor. Making the decision to consult a physician is the first important step, one that unfortunately can still be a difficult one for some men. Men who are struggling with issues related to sexual function should have their sleep evaluated by their physician. The good news is that treatments for obstructive sleep apnea — particularly the CPAP — are safe and effective. In some cases, hormone replacement therapy for conditions such as erectile dysfunction may be appropriate, independently or in conjunction with treatment for a sleep disorder.

What are the implications for women of low testosterone levels from lack of sleep? Women are particularly vulnerable to sleep problems related to hormone changes and deficiencies throughout their lives. We talk most frequently about estrogen and progesterone, the primary hormones involved in menstruation. But testosterone should be added to the list of hormonal factors to consider when thinking about hormone-related sleep problems in women.

Women, like men, are also likely to find their sexual lives negatively affected by obstructive sleep apnea. Several studies have found strong correlations between obstructive sleep apnea and sexual dysfunction in women. As obstructive sleep apnea grows worse, problems with sexual function — including sensation and desire — become more serious, according to this research. Women are particularly at risk for un-diagnosed sleep problems, including sleep-disordered breathing. Women who are experiencing problems with sexual function should have their sleep evaluated. This works in both directions: Women who are being treated for sleep problems — particularly obstructive sleep apnea — should work with their physician to assess the potential effect of their sleep disorder on their sexual health.

We know that sleep deprivation poses a greater risk of cardiovascular problems for women than for men. It’s just possible that the resulting lower testosterone levels may have something to do with this. Testosterone has a protective effect on the heart, reducing inflammatory proteins that can cause heart damage.

The more we know about how testosterone affects sleep and sexual health in men and women, the better clinicians will be able to help restore healthy functioning to two critical aspects of our lives.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-michael-j-breus/testosterone-sleep-sexual-health_b_981121.html

For more information on our therapies please contact Clinic Director Charlie Blaisdell at CBlaisdell@CoreNewEngland.com

BTP/CORE New England/ Core Medical Group
920 Washington Street
Norwood, MA 02062
Clinic: 781-269-5953

Reduced testosterone tied to endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure

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Men, women and children exposed to high levels of phthalates – endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in plastics and some personal care products – tended to have reduced levels of testosterone in their blood compared to those with lower chemical exposure, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Testosterone is the main sex hormone in men. It contributes to a variety of functions in both sexes, including physical growth and strength, brain function, bone density and cardiovascular health. In the last 50 years, research has identified a trend of declining testosterone in men and a rise in related health conditions, including reduced semen quality in men and genital malformations in newborn boys.

Animal and cellular studies have found that some phthalates block the effects of testosterone on the body’s organs and tissues. Researchers set out to examine whether these chemicals, which are widely used in flexible PVC plastics and personal care products, had a similar effect in humans.

“We found evidence reduced levels of circulating testosterone were associated with increased phthalate exposure in several key populations, including boys ages 6-12, and men and women ages 40-60,” said one of the study’s authors, John D. Meeker, MS, ScD, of the University of Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor, MI. “This may have important public health implications, since low testosterone levels in young boys can negatively impact reproductive development, and in middle age can impair sexual function, libido, energy, cognitive function and bone health in men and women.”

The cross-sectional study examined phthalate exposure and testosterone levels in 2,208 people who participated in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012. Researchers analyzed urine samples to measure concentrations of 13 substances left after the body metabolizes phthalates. Each participant’s testosterone level was measured using a blood sample.

Researchers found an inverse relationship between phthalate exposure and testosterone levels at various life stages. In women ages 40-60, for example, increased phthalate concentrations were associated with a 10.8 to 24 percent decline in testosterone levels. Among boys ages 6-12, increased concentrations of metabolites of a phthalate called di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, or DEHP, was linked to a 24 to 34.1 percent drop in testosterone levels.

“While the study’s cross-sectional design limit the conclusions we can draw, our results support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals such as phthalates could be contributing to the trend of declining testosterone and related disorders,” Meeker said. “With mounting evidence for adverse health effects, individuals and policymakers alike may want to take steps to limit human exposure to the degree possible.”

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Meeker and Kelly K. Ferguson, PhD, of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, are the authors of the study.

The study, “Urinary Phthalate Metabolites are Associated with Decreased Serum Testosterone in Men, Women and Children from NHANES 2011-2012,” was published online, ahead of print.

Founded in 1916, the Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, the Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 17,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Washington, DC. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-08/tes-rtt081314.php

For for more information on our therapies please contact Clinic Director Charlie Blaisdell at CBlaisdell@CoreNewEngland.com

BTP/CORE New England/ Core Medical Group
920 Washington Street
Norwood, MA 02062
Clinic: 781-269-5953

Testosterone therapy may help improve pain in men with low testosterone

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Testosterone therapy is associated with decreased pain perception in men with low testosterone levels related to opioid (narcotic) pain relievers (analgesics), a new study finds. The results were presented Monday at The Endocrine Society’s 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

 “In this study, we attempted to determine whether testosterone replacement improves pain perception and tolerance, and quality of life in men with low testosterone levels due to narcotic analgesics,” said the study’s lead author Shehzad Basaria, MD, Medical Director, Section of Men’s Health, Aging, & Metabolism at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, in Boston, MA. “We found that testosterone administration in these men was associated with a greater reduction in several measures of pain sensitivity during laboratory pain testing compared with men who were on placebo.”

Opioids belong to a class of pain-reducing drugs that are used to relieve chronic pain from injuries, surgery and cancer treatment. These drugs include morphine, codeine, fentanyl and oxycodone, and are among the most frequently prescribed medications in the United States today.

In addition to being highly addictive, opioid use is associated with a number of side effects, including suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both women and men, resulting in decreased testosterone production. Low testosterone, in turn, can result in sexual dysfunction, decreased muscle mass, increased fat mass and decreased quality of life.

Previous animal research has demonstrated that castration of rodents is associated with increased pain perception while testosterone replacement reduces pain perception, suggesting an analgesic effect of this sex steroid. Whether these beneficial effects can be replicated in humans, however, remained unclear.

In this study, investigators found that, compared to placebo, testosterone therapy significantly improved pain perception and tolerance during laboratory pain testing. Testosterone therapy also improved some aspects of quality of life.

“If larger studies confirm these findings, testosterone therapy in this patient population may be beneficial in improving pain perception,” Basaria said.

The study included 84 men ages 18-64 years old with opioid-induced testosterone deficiency. Their average age was 49 years. Of this group, 65 participants completed the study. Investigators randomly assigned participants to receive either testosterone gel, applied to the skin, or placebo, for 14 weeks. Thirty-six men received the testosterone gel, and 29 received a placebo.

At the beginning of the study, and then again at 14 weeks, the investigators assessed pain measures and quality-of-life parameters.

Solvay (now Abbott) Pharmaceuticals, Inc. funded the study.

Source: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-06-testosterone-therapy-pain-men.html

For for more information on our therapies please contact Clinic Director Charlie Blaisdell at CBlaisdell@CoreNewEngland.com

BTP/CORE New England/ Core Medical Group
920 Washington Street
Norwood, MA 02062
Clinic: 781-269-5953

Keeping older muscles strong

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As we grow older, we lose strength and muscle mass. However, the cause of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy has remained a mystery.

Scientists at the University of Iowa have discovered the first example of a protein that causes muscle weakness and loss during aging. The protein, ATF4, is a transcription factor that alters gene expression in skeletal muscle, causing reduction of muscle protein synthesis, strength, and mass. The UI study also identifies two natural compounds, one found in apples and one found in green tomatoes, which reduce ATF4 activity in aged skeletal muscle. The findings, which were published online Sept. 3 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to new therapies for age-related muscle weakness and atrophy.

“Many of us know from our own experiences that muscle weakness and atrophy are big problems as we become older,” says Christopher Adams, MD, PhD, UI professor of internal medicine and senior study author. “These problems have a major impact on our quality of life and health.”

Previously, Adams and his team had identified ursolic acid, which is found in apple peel, and tomatidine, which comes from green tomatoes, as small molecules that can prevent acute muscle wasting caused by starvation and inactivity. Those studies set the stage for testing whether ursolic acid and tomatidine might be effective in blocking the largest cause of muscle weakness and atrophy: aging.

In their latest study, Adams’ team found that ursolic acid and tomatidine dramatically reduce age-related muscle weakness and atrophy in mice. Elderly mice with age-related muscle weakness and atrophy were fed diets lacking or containing either 0.27 percent ursolic acid, or 0.05 percent tomatidine for two months. The scientists found that both compounds increased muscle mass by 10 percent, and more importantly, increased muscle quality, or strength, by 30 percent. The sizes of these effects suggest that the compounds largely restored muscle mass and strength to young adult levels.

“Based on these results, ursolic acid and tomatidine appear to have a lot of potential as tools for dealing with muscle weakness and atrophy during aging,” Adams says. “We also thought we might be able to use ursolic acid and tomatidine as tools to find a root cause of muscle weakness and atrophy during aging.”

Adams’ team investigated the molecular effects of ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged skeletal muscle. They found that both compounds turn off a group of genes that are turned on by the transcription factor ATF4. This led them to engineer and study a new strain of mice that lack ATF4 in skeletal muscle. Like old muscles that were treated with ursolic acid and tomatidine, old muscles lacking ATF4 were resistant to the effects of aging.

“By reducing ATF4 activity, ursolic acid and tomatidine allow skeletal muscle to recover from effects of aging,” says Adams, who also is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI and a staff physician with the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

The UI study was done in collaboration with Emmyon, Inc., a UI-based biotechnology company founded by Adams, that is now working to translate ursolic acid and tomatidine into foods, supplements, and pharmaceuticals that can help preserve or recover strength and muscle mass as people grow older.

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In addition to Adams, the UI team included Michael Dyle, Steven Bullard, Jason Dierdorff, Daryl Murry, Daniel Fox, Kale Bongers, Vitor Lira, and David Meyerholz, as well as Scott Ebert and John Talley at Emmyon, Inc.

The study was funded by a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to Emmyon, Inc. from the National Institute on Aging, as well as grants from the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the University of Iowa.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-09/uoih-kom090815.php

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