New Research Substantiates the Anti-Aging Properties of DHEA

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Originally Published by Life Extension Magazine

By Kirk Stokel

In 2007, Life Extension® led the battle against Congress’s ill-conceived campaign to re-classify DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) as an “anabolic steroid drug”— an act that would have made this life-sustaining compound unavailable to the American public without a prescription.

Today, less than three years later, scientists have uncovered even more research substantiating DHEA’s remarkable health-promoting benefits.

Sometimes called the “youth hormone,” DHEA is the most abundant hormone precursor in the human body and a source of the sex hormones.

Its steady and precipitous decline is an inevitable consequence of aging, (1) and contributes to the onset of degenerative disease.

The latest scientific discoveries indicate that as little as 50 mg of DHEA per day may:

1. Inhibit multiple factors implicated in metabolic syndrome by favorably altering gene expression;
2. Boost bone strength and ward off osteoarthritis;
3. Enhance memory.(2-5)

Daily intake of 90 mg per day and higher has been shown to improve cognitive function and alleviate depression both in the elderly and among individuals suffering from debilitating mental illness.(6,7)

In this article, you will discover the most up-to-date evidence of DHEA’s profoundly beneficial impact across multiple systems of the body.

Potent Cognitive Support

DHEA deficiency is implicated in numerous age-related conditions, including declines in brain and nervous system function. The latest research suggests that DHEA supplementation may exert powerful neuroprotective effects.

In fact, 2009 witnessed extraordinary advances in our understanding of the cognitive and memory-enhancing benefits of DHEA.

Two large studies showed that levels of DHEA-S in elderly patients correlated significantly and positively with cognitive function. (Chemically similar to DHEA, DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA.)(8,9) Prior research had shown that higher DHEA-S levels were directly associated with improved concentration, working memory, and executive (decision-making) function.(10)

Israeli scientists found that the cognitive dysfunction that occurs in schizophrenia is also partly associated with levels of DHEA-S and other neurosteroids.(11) Supplementation with 200 mg per day of DHEA in schizophrenic patients improved attention and motor skills compared with placebo.(6) Although the direct symptoms of schizophrenia were unaffected, DHEA’s ability to provide relief from the cognitive deficits associated with this severe psychiatric condition may significantly improve quality of life in these individuals.

The last few years have also yielded new pre-clinical data on DHEA’s neuroprotective, memory-enhancing effects. In one noteworthy study, DHEA significantly improved memory retention and consolidation in mice—especially when the experimental equivalent of an emotional stimulus was involved.(12) This may be related to DHEA’s ability to stimulate the proliferation of key brain cell receptors specifically associated with memory processing.(13)

When given to aging rats, DHEA was shown to enhance brain cell utilization of ATP—the body’s fundamental energy-storage molecule—thereby protecting the cell membranes from age-related damage.(14) Impaired energy utilization and reduced production of ATP contribute to the “neuronal energy crises” that underlie Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.(15)

A landmark 2007 study showed that DHEA supplementation of 150 mg twice daily improved memory recall and mood in healthy young men, specifically increasing activity in the hippocampus, the region of the brain most closely associated with mnemonic function (memory).(5)

Enhance Your Mood—Naturally

Depression often accompanies aging, frequently emerging in older individuals.(16,17) Fortunately, we now recognize depression as an essentially physiological condition—one that can be treated. Low DHEA levels are known to render aging humans more vulnerable to depression in the presence of triggers such as rejection or isolation.(18) Negative emotional stimuli have been shown to lower DHEA levels even further.(19)

Supplementation with DHEA can powerfully mitigate depression and its effects. A National Institute of Mental Health study of depressive men and women aged 45-65 years showed significant improvement over 6 weeks among those who took 90 mg of DHEA per day for 3 weeks and then 450 mg per day for 3 weeks, compared with placebo.(7)The study also showed significant improvements in sexual functioning scores in supplemented patients, but not among control patients. In a rare admission from the generally conservative National Institute of Mental Health, their conclusion was, “We find DHEA to be an effective treatment for midlife-onset major and minor depression.”

In a set of studies, DHEA was found to improve both mood and energy while alleviating depression.(20-22) Israeli researchers also demonstrated minimal effects on other hormonal profiles, alleviating concerns about adverse events with DHEA.(23)

A remarkable 2006 study demonstrated reduction in depressive symptoms in an especially challenging population—patients with HIV/AIDS.(24)

Several 2009 studies revealed associations of low DHEA levels with a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and were able to show that DHEA influences gene expression in the brain.(25) For example, DHEA modulates expression of genes directly involved in appetite regulation, energy utilization, and alertness.(26) Another study demonstrated that DHEA acted in synergy with the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac®), leading researchers to suggest DHEA as “a useful adjunct therapy for depression.”(27)

Support for Aging Bones and Joints

A 2000 study demonstrated improved bone turnover—more marked in women than in men—during a year-long study of daily 50 mg supplementation with DHEA.(28) (Bone turnover is the natural process by which the body replaces old bone from the skeleton and replaces it with new bone.) By 2003, laboratory evidence emerged suggesting that DHEA could potentially enhance joint function and ward off osteoarthritis(OA).(2)

DHEA treatment of cartilage tissue taken from patients with OA increased production of healthy, flexible type II collagen protein, while reducing production of the less flexible type I collagen associated with scar formation.2 DHEA also modified the imbalance between cartilage-destroying enzymes and those that protect cartilage from damage. These impressive effects were the direct result of DHEA’s capacity to favorably modulate gene expression.

DHEA’s effects on bone structure are no less significant. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of 50 mg per day of DHEA administered orally versus placebo for 12 months showed improved hip bone mineral density (BMD) in older men and women with low DHEA-S levels, with additional improvements in spine BMD in women.(3,29) A larger study in 2008 showed that DHEA not only improved lumbar spine BMD in women (not men) taking 50 mg per day for a year, but it also reduced blood-borne markers of bone resorption,(30) an important measure of overall bone health and bone aging. Not surprisingly, the addition of vitamin D and calcium supplements to a DHEA regimen may afford further benefit.(31)

What You Need to Know: DHEA
• DHEA, the most common hormone precursor in the body, is intimately associated with youthful and healthy functioning across a range of physiological systems.• Levels of DHEA decline steadily with age, and low DHEA levels are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, diabetes, obesity, loss of vigor and sexual energy, depression, and even visible skin aging.

• The most up-to-date scientific research indicates that DHEA can protect brain cells involved in memory function, alleviate depression and enhance mood, strengthen bone health, bolster immunity, lower blood glucose, limit the complications of obesity and diabetes, support healthy cardiovascular function, and enhance sexuality at both the psychological and physical levels.

• As little as 50 mg of DHEA per day may favorably alter gene expression to inhibit multiple factors implicated in metabolic syndrome; boost bone strength; enhance cognitive function and memory; and ward off osteoarthritis.

• DHEA is also available in topical crèmes that has been shown to dramatically enhance the youthful appearance of skin.

• Individuals who have been diagnosed with any type of hormone-related cancer should not supplement with DHEA.

Optimal Immune Strength and Anti-Viral Protection

The precipitous age-related decline in DHEA/DHEA-S levels results in the immune deficiency we call immunosenescence.(32) Supplementation with DHEA may beneficially modulate immunity(33,34) to help combat debilitating age-related conditions through multiple, complementary pathways.

DHEA has boosted immune function in blood cells taken from patients after major abdominal surgery.(35) This action may help to prevent serious infections and promote healing. In the setting of dangerous infections and trauma in laboratory animals, DHEA and its metabolites markedly upregulate host immune responses, modulate inflammation, and improve survival.(36-38) In animal models, DHEA’s ability to raise sex hormone concentrations to youthful levels also promoted wound healing.(39)

DHEA also possesses significant antiviral properties. It has blocked replication of several different, potentially deadly virus families in the laboratory—more effectively and more selectively than the drug ribavirin!(40,41)

A 2008 study showed that DHEA also increases natural resistance to certain lethal parasites, including Trypanosma cruzi (the cause of Chagas disease),(42) a microorganism that causes death from heart disease and brain damage, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Subsequent research conducted in 2009 found that DHEA supplementation reduced parasite levels, raised levels of defensive macrophage white blood cells, and increased levels of immune signalling interferons.(43,44)

Among individuals stricken with autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, treatment with conventional corticosteroids not only over-suppresses the immune system, it can also promote bone resorption and catastrophic fractures. DHEA has been shown to reduce expression of cytokines and other factors that lead to bone resorption in steroid-treated tissue, while still suppressing inflammation effectively.(45)

There’s good news for asthma and allergy patients who respond poorly to regular steroid usage as well. DHEA is now known to suppress allergy-induced inflammatory cytokines in reactive airway cells while increasing the ratio of beneficial interferon to inflammatory cytokines—highly significant advances in the management of this troubling condition.(46)

Combat Metabolic Disorders

We’ve known for over a decade that DHEA protects against obesity and its consequences in aging and diabetic animals.(47,48) In 2009, scientists confirmed that low DHEA levels in men were linked to diabetes and coronary heart disease.(49) DHEA powerfully modulates gene expression to shift the metabolic balance in favor of energy utilization and away from storage as fat.(50)

DHEA also activates gene expression of cellular machinery that affects a cell’s consumption of fats and sugars to remove them from circulation.(51,52) These molecules help correct harmful lipid abnormalities and unhealthy body fat distribution—a possible mechanism by which DHEA decreases total body fat.(53,54)

In 2007, researchers demonstrated in aged rats fed a high-fat diet that DHEA increased body protein, while decreasing total caloric intake, body weight, body fat, and total size and number of fat cells.(5)5 In a related experiment, researchers discovered that DHEA could change the composition of adipose tissue, boosting levels of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids while reducing harmful omega-6 fatty acids.(56)

A human study showed how powerfully these DHEA effects can modify body composition.(4) When 52 elderly men and women took 50 mg per day of DHEA or placebo for 6 months, it reduced stubborn abdominal and subcutaneous body fat. Insulin levels dropped significantly in supplemented patients as well, indicating enhanced insulin sensitivity. The researchers concluded appropriately that “DHEA replacement could play a role in prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome associated with abdominal obesity.” “DHEA replacement could play a role in prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome associated with abdominal obesity.”

DHEA is highly protective against diabetes and its complications. In diabetic rats, DHEA prevented increases in oxidant stress and oxidative damage related to the disease. It also significantly improved blood vessel relaxation, improving blood flow.(57) DHEA induces genes in muscle tissue that increase uptake and utilization of blood glucose as energy, significantly lowering blood sugar in diabetic animals.(58) In humans with type 2 diabetes, DHEA counteracts oxidative imbalance and the formation of deadly advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and downregulates the inflammatory TNF-alpha system—effects that may prevent the onset and slow the progression of deadly diabetes.(59)

Cardiovascular Disease Defense

The past several years have witnessed extraordinary advances in our understanding of DHEA’s cardioprotective power—and its relationship to cardiovascular disease.

A 2009 study of 153 diabetic men with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) found that 77% were DHEA-S deficient, significantly more than in healthy peers.(60) Over the next 19 months of follow-up, 43 of those men died of CHD; the data showed that low DHEA-S and low testostosterone levels were two of the four most significant predictors of death.

Another 2009 study of 247 men with a mean age of 76 years revealed that those with low DHEA-S had a 96% increased risk of diabetes and a 48% increased risk of coronary heart disease.(49)

A 2009 study from the University of Pennsylvania discovered a surprisingly close relationship between mortality and the trajectory of DHEA-S decline in older adults.(61) Specifically, a rapid or erratic decline in DHEA-S predicted earlier death, and both together increased the death rate by nearly threefold! Regular blood testing for healthy DHEA-S levels are the only way to detect these lethal changes in DHEA levels early. It is of paramount importance that you have your DHEA-S levels checked at least once a year.

A Mayo Clinic study found that DHEA supplementation (50 mg per day) in women with low DHEA levels and low adrenal function improved plasma DHEA content, significantly lowered total cholesterol, and tended to reduce triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels.(62) But supplemented patients also had reductions in their beneficial high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. This study suggests that long-term studies are needed to determine the impact of DHEA supplementation on cardiovascular risk in women with low adrenal function.

Additional support for DHEA’s benefits in patients suffering from vascular disease came in two remarkable 2009 studies.(63,64) The first examined vascular remodeling, a dangerous process that occurs when vessels are injured by atherosclerosis.(63) Vascular remodeling can impede blood flow and ultimately worsen cardiovascular disease.(65)

DHEA significantly inhibited vascular remodeling in a rabbit model of carotid artery injury and limited deadly buildup of smooth muscle in vessel walls.(63) Another study of rabbits fed a high-fat diet showed that DHEA supplements restored oxidative balance, lowered lipid levels and inflammatory damage, and prevented heart muscle tissue death and dysfunction, delaying the onset of cardiac damage.(64)

Enhanced Well-Being and Libido Even in Challenged Populations

Studies as early as 2000 demonstrated how DHEA improved well-being and could help to manage menopause without deleterious effects.(28,66) In 2006 it was revealed that 50 mg per day of DHEA could improve psychological well-being even in challenging populations such as those with decreased pituitary function.(67)

DHEA exerted a remarkably positive effect on health-related quality of life in women taking long-term steroids for lupus (chronic steroid therapy can produce powerful depression and reduction in quality of life measures).(68) Of particular importance, the DHEA-supplemented groups also reported improvement in sexuality.

Additional research supports an excitatory effect for DHEA on sexuality—especially in women. In one study, sixteen sexually functional postmenopausal women were randomly given either placebo or a single DHEA supplement of 300 mg, 60 minutes before presentation of an erotic video.(69) Women in the supplement group showed significantly greater mental and physical sexual arousal during the video than did the control women. The supplemented women also reported a greater increase in positive affect (generally feeling good) compared to placebo recipients.

A 2009 animal study may shed light on some of the physical causes behind these benefits: DHEA applied to the smooth muscle of rabbit clitoris resulted in significant relaxation,(70) allowing the increased blood flow and engorgement that results in enhanced sensitivity during sexual arousal.

Favorable Gene Expression for Youthful, Glowing Skin

A growing body of scientific evidence suggests that DHEA has especially favorable effects on skin health and appearance. In a 2000 laboratory study, DHEA was shown to increase production of collagen—the protein that gives youthful skin its suppleness—while decreasing production of the collagenase enzymes that destroy it.(71)

It wasn’t until 2008, however, that Canadian scientists discovered more than 50 DHEA-responsive genes in the skin of women using a topical DHEA crème.(72) DHEA “switched on” multiple collagen-producing genes and reduced expression of genes associated with production and cornification (hardening) of the tough keratinocytes that form calluses and rough skin. The researchers concluded, “DHEA could exert an anti-aging effect in the skin through stimulation of collagen biosynthesis, improved structural organization of the dermis while modulating keratinocyte metabolism.”

Other unexpected benefits of topical DHEA on aging skin are emerging. DHEA treatment increases production of sebum, or skin oil.(73) Sebum not only contributes to smooth, supple skin; it also contains myriad antimicrobial components that prevent infection and irritation. Topical DHEA also improves skin “brightness” and counteracts the “papery” appearance of aging skin, combating the epidermal thinning that is a visible hallmark of aging.(73) The study authors note that these are “beneficial effects on skin characteristics that are rarely provided by topical treatments.”

Summary

In the past few years alone, significant scientific substantiation of DHEA’s anti-aging effects has emerged. Its neuroprotective effects are now recognized as being vital in protecting memory and reducing depressive symptoms in older adults. DHEA enhances bone health by improving mineralization to reduce fracture risk. DHEA modulates immunity in a coordinated fashion, boosting resistance to infection while quelling dangerous inflammation. DHEA supports cardiovascular health and activates genes that prevent cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes and obesity. DHEA is intimately involved in improving quality of life and bolstering sexual arousal, while dramatically improving the appearance of healthy, youthful skin. As little as 50 mg of DHEA per day may favorably alter gene expression to inhibit multiple factors implicated in metabolic syndrome; boost bone strength; enhance cognitive function and memory; and ward off osteoarthritis. DHEA topical crèmes allow ready application of DHEA to the site of action.

Note: Individuals who have been diagnosed with a hormone-dependent cancer should not supplement with DHEA until their cancer is cured.

The Health & Rejuvenation Center offers various therapies for our patients and comprehensive health screenings, including DHEA Therapy and Testosterone Therapy. If you would like to learn more, just follow this link and fill out our short Contact Form for a Free Consultation or Call Us at 800-466-2209 to speak with one of our Clinical Assistants.

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58. Sato K, Iemitsu M, Aizawa K, Ajisaka R. DHEA improves impaired activation of Akt and PKC zeta/lambda-GLUT4 pathway in skeletal muscle and improves hyperglycaemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetes rats. Acta Physiol (Oxf). 2009 Nov;197(3):217-25.

59. Brignardello E, Runzo C, Aragno M, et al. Dehydroepiandrosterone administration counteracts oxidative imbalance and advanced glycation end product formation in type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetes Care. 2007 Nov;30(11):2922-7.

60. Ponikowska B, Jankowska EA, Maj J, et al. Gonadal and adrenal androgen deficiencies as independent predictors of increased cardiovascular mortality in men with type II diabetes mellitus and stable coronary artery disease. Int J Cardiol. 2009 Apr 21.

61. Cappola AR, O’Meara ES, Guo W, Bartz TM, Fried LP, Newman AB. Trajectories of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate predict mortality in older adults: the cardiovascular health study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2009 Dec;64(12):1268-74.

62. Srinivasan M, Irving BA, Dhatariya K, et al. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone replacement on lipoprotein profile in hypoadrenal women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Mar;94(3):761-4.

63. Ii M, Hoshiga M, Negoro N, et al. Adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate inhibits vascular remodeling following arterial injury. Atherosclerosis. 2009 Sep;206(1):77-85.

64. Aragno M, Meineri G, Vercellinatto I, et al. Cardiac impairment in rabbits fed a high-fat diet is counteracted by dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation. Life Sci. 2009 Jul 3;85(1-2):77-84.

65. Mitchell GF. Effects of central arterial aging on the structure and function of the peripheral vasculature: implications for end-organ damage. J Appl Physiol. 2008 Nov;105(5):1652-60.

66. Stomati M, Monteleone P, Casarosa E, et al. Six-month oral dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation in early and late postmenopause. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2000 Oct;14(5):342-63.

67. Brooke AM, Kalingag LA, Miraki-Moud F, et al. Dehydroepiandrosterone improves psychological well-being in male and female hypopituitary patients on maintenance growth hormone replacement. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Oct;91(10):3773-9.

68. Nordmark G, Bengtsson C, Larsson A, Karlsson FA, Sturfelt G, Rönnblom L. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone supplement on health-related quality of life in glucocorticoid treated female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Autoimmunity. 2005 Nov;38(7):531-40.

69. Hackbert L, Heiman JR. Acute dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) effects on sexual arousal in postmenopausal women. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002 Mar;11(2):155-62.

70. Lee SY, Myung SC, Lee MY, et al. The effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)/DHEA-sulfate (DHEAS) on the contraction responses of the clitoral cavernous smooth muscle from female rabbits. J Sex Med. 2009 Oct;6(10):2653-60.

71. Lee KS, Oh KY, Kim BC. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone on collagen and collagenase gene expression by skin fibroblasts in culture. J Dermatol Sci. 2000 Jun;23(2):103-10.

72. Calvo E, Luu-The V, Morissette J, et al. Pangenomic changes induced by DHEA in the skin of postmenopausal women. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2008 Dec;112(4-5):186-93.

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Glutathione: The Mother of All Antioxidants

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Glutathione: The Mother of All Antioxidants

By: Mark Hyman, MD

It’s the most important molecule you need to stay healthy and prevent disease — yet you’ve probably never heard of it. It’s the secret to prevent aging, cancer, heart disease, dementia and more, and necessary to treat everything from autism to Alzheimer’s disease. There are more than 89,000 medical articles about it — but your doctor doesn’t know how address the epidemic deficiency of this critical life-giving molecule …

What is it? I’m talking about the mother of all antioxidants, the master detoxifier and maestro of the immune system: GLUTATHIONE (pronounced “gloota-thigh-own”).

The good news is that your body produces its own glutathione. The bad news is that poor diet, pollution, toxins, medications, stress, trauma, aging, infections and radiation all deplete your glutathione.

This leaves you susceptible to unrestrained cell disintegration from oxidative stress, free radicals, infections and cancer. And your liver gets overloaded and damaged, making it unable to do its job of detoxification.

In treating chronically ill patients with Functional Medicine for more than 10 years, I have discovered that glutathione deficiency is found in nearly all very ill patients. These include people with chronic fatigue syndrome, heart disease, cancer, chronic infections, autoimmune disease, diabetes, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, asthma, kidney problems, liver disease and more.

At first I thought that this was just a coincidental finding, but over the years I have come to realize that our ability to produce and maintain a high level of glutathione is critical to recovery from nearly all chronic illness — and to preventing disease and maintaining optimal health and performance. The authors of those 76,000 medical articles on glutathione I mentioned earlier have found the same thing!

So in today’s blog I want to explain what glutathione is, why it’s important and give you 9 tips that will help you optimize your glutathione levels, improve your detoxification system and protect help yourself from chronic illness.

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione is a very simple molecule that is produced naturally all the time in your body. It is a combination of three simple building blocks of protein or amino acids — cysteine, glycine and glutamine.

The secret of its power is the sulfur (SH) chemical groups it contains. Sulfur is a sticky, smelly molecule. It acts like fly paper and all the bad things in the body stick onto it, including free radicals and toxins like mercury and other heavy metals.

Normally glutathione is recycled in the body — except when the toxic load becomes too great. And that explains why we are in such trouble …

In my practice, I test the genes involved in glutathione metabolism. These are the genes involved in producing enzymes that allow the body to create and recycle glutathione in the body. These genes have many names, such as GSTM1, GSTP1 and more.

These genes impaired in some people for a variety of important reasons. We humans evolved in a time before the 80,000 toxic industrial chemicals found in our environment today were introduced into our world, before electromagnetic radiation was everywhere and before we polluted our skies, lakes, rivers, oceans and teeth with mercury and lead.

That is why most people survived with the basic version of the genetic detoxification software encoded in our DNA, which is mediocre at ridding the body of toxins. At the time humans evolved we just didn’t need more. Who knew we would be poisoning ourselves and eating a processed, nutrient-depleted diet thousands of years later?

Because most of us didn’t require additional detoxification software, almost of half of the population now has a limited capacity to get rid of toxins. These people are missing GSTM1 function — one of the most important genes needed in the process of creating and recycling glutathione in the body.

Nearly all my very sick patients are missing this function. The one-third of our population that suffers from chronic disease is missing this essential gene. That includes me. Twenty years ago I became mercury poisoned and suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome due to this very problem. My GSTM1 function was inadequate and I didn’t produce enough glutathione as a result. Eventually, my body broke down and I became extremely ill …

This is the same problem I see in so many of my patients. They are missing this critical gene and they descend into disease as a result. Let me explain how this happens …

The Importance of Glutathione in Protecting Against Chronic Illness

Glutathione is critical for one simple reason: It recycles antioxidants. You see, dealing with free radicals is like handing off a hot potato. They get passed around from vitamin C to vitamin E to lipoic acid and then finally to glutathione which cools off the free radicals and recycles other antioxidants. After this happens, the body can “reduce” or regenerate another protective glutathione molecule and we are back in business.

However, problems occur when we are overwhelmed with too much oxidative stress or too many toxins. Then the glutathione becomes depleted and we can no longer protect ourselves against free radicals, infections, or cancer and we can’t get rid of toxins. This leads to further sickness and soon we are in the downward spiral of chronic illness.

But that’s not all. Glutathione is also critical in helping your immune system do its job of fighting infections and preventing cancer. That’s why studies show that it can help in the treatment of AIDS.(i)

Glutathione is also the most critical and integral part of your detoxification system. All the toxins stick onto glutathione, which then carries them into the bile and the stool — and out of your body.

And lastly, it also helps us reach peak mental and physical function. Research has shown that raised glutathione levels decrease muscle damage, reduce recovery time, increase strength and endurance and shift metabolism from fat production to muscle development.

If you are sick or old or are just not in peak shape, you likely have glutathione deficiency.
In fact, the top British medical journal, the Lancet, found the highest glutathione levels in healthy young people, lower levels in healthy elderly, lower still in sick elderly and the lowest of all in the hospitalized elderly. (ii)

Keeping yourself healthy, boosting your performance, preventing disease and aging well depends on keeping your glutathione levels high. I’ll say it again … Glutathione is so important because it is responsible for keeping so many of the keys to ultimate wellness optimized.

It is critical for immune function and controlling inflammation. It is the master detoxifier and the body’s main antioxidant, protecting our cells and making our energy metabolism run well.

And the good news is that you can do many things to increase this natural and critical molecule in your body. You can eat glutathione-boosting foods. You can exercise. And you can take glutathione-boosting supplements. Let’s review more specifics about each.

9 Tips to Optimize your Glutathione Levels

These 9 tips will help you improve your glutathione levels, improve your health, optimize your performance and live a long, healthy life.

Eat Foods that Support Glutathione Production

1. Consume sulfur-rich foods. The main ones in the diet are garlic, onions and the cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, kale, collards, cabbage, cauliflower, watercress, etc.).

2. Try bioactive whey protein. This is great source of cysteine and the amino acid building blocks for glutathione synthesis. As you know, I am not a big fan of dairy. But this is an exception — with a few warnings. The whey protein MUST be bioactive and made from non-denatured proteins (“denaturing” refers to the breakdown of the normal protein structure). Choose non-pasteurized and non-industrially produced milk that contains no pesticides, hormones, or antibiotics. Immunocal is a prescription bioactive non-denatured whey protein that is even listed in the Physician’s Desk Reference.

Exercise for Your Way to More Glutathione

3. Exercise boosts your glutathione levels and thereby helps boost your immune system, improve detoxification and enhance your body’s own antioxidant defenses. Start slow and build up to 30 minutes a day of vigorous aerobic exercise like walking or jogging, or play various sports. Strength training for 20 minutes 3 times a week is also helpful.

Take Glutathione Supporting Supplements

One would think it would be easy just to take glutathione as a pill, but the body digests protein — so you wouldn’t get the benefits if you did it this way. However, the production and recycling of glutathione in the body requires many different nutrients and you CAN take these. Here are the main supplements that need to be taken consistently to boost glutathione. Besides taking a multivitamin and fish oil, supporting my glutathione levels with these supplements is the most important thing I do every day for my personal health.

4. N-acetyl-cysteine. This has been used for years to help treat asthma and lung disease and to treat people with life-threatening liver failure from Tylenol overdose. In fact, I first learned about it in medical school while working in the emergency room. It is even given to prevent kidney damage from dyes used during x-ray studies.

5. Alpha lipoic acid. This is a close second to glutathione in importance in our cells and is involved in energy production, blood sugar control, brain health and detoxification. The body usually makes it, but given all the stresses we are under, we often become depleted.

6. Methylation nutrients (folate and vitamins B6 and B12). These are perhaps the most critical to keep the body producing glutathione. Methylation and the production and recycling of glutathione are the two most important biochemical functions in your body. Take folate (especially in the active form of 5 methyltetrahydrofolate), B6 (in active form of P5P) and B12 (in the active form of methylcobalamin).

7. Selenium. This important mineral helps the body recycle and produce more glutathione.

8. A family of antioxidants including vitamins C and E (in the form of mixed tocopherols), work together to recycle glutathione.

9. Milk thistle (silymarin) has long been used in liver disease and helps boost glutathione levels.

So use these nine tips and see how they work to help you optimzie your glutathione levels. When you do, you will take one more step to lifelong vibrant health.

Now I’d like to hear from you…

Had you ever heard of this important nutrient before?

Have you tried any of the advice in this article?

What effects have you noticed on your health?

Please leave your thoughts by adding a comment below.

To your good health,

Mark Hyman, M.D.

References

(i) De Rosa SC, Zaretsky MD, Dubs JG, Roederer M, Anderson M, Green A, Mitra D, Watanabe N, Nakamura H, Tjioe I, Deresinski SC, Moore WA, Ela SW, Parks D, Herzenberg LA, Herzenberg LA. N-acetylcysteine replenishes glutathione in HIV infection. Eur J Clin Invest. 2000 Oct;30(10):915-29

(ii) Nuttall S, Martin U, Sinclair A, Kendall M. 1998. Glutathione: in sickness and in health. TheLancet 351(9103):645-646

Adrenal Fatigue Explained

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Adrenal Fatigue or Hypoadrenia can be treated. Those with adrenal fatigue can recover with proven and safe adrenal fatique supplement. Adrenal fatique occurs when poor nutrition, physical or emotional stress weaken and deplete the adrenal glands to the point that they no longer are able to provide balanced amounts of steroid hormones. The adrenal glands can deplete the body’s hormonal and energy reserves, and may either shrink in size or hypertrophy (enlarge).

 

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms that is the results of the adrenal glands inability to produce enough hormones to supply the body’s demand. It should not be confused with Addison’s Disease which is adrenal failure. Such condition can worsen if proper Adrenal Fatigue Treatment is not taken.

 

Find out more about the Adrenal Fatigue Supplements we have available!

The overproduction of adrenal hormones caused by prolonged stress can weaken the immune system and inhibit the production of white blood cells that protect the body against foreign invaders (in particular lymphocytes and lymph node function). Adrenal dysfunction can disrupt the body’s blood sugar metabolism, causing weakness, fatigue, and a feeling of being run down. It can also interfere with normal sleep rhythms and produce a wakeful, unrelaxing sleep state, making a person feel worn out even after a full night’s sleep.

 

Many patients appear in their practitioner’s office with symptoms of depression, anxiety, panic attacks and are placed on antidepressant or anti-anxiety medication when in reality they suffer from adrenal fatigue.

 

Normal Adrenal Gland Functions

Your adrenal glands are two tiny pyramid-shaped pieces of tissue situated right above each kidney. Their job is to produce and release, when appropriate, certain regulatory hormones and chemical messengers.

 

The adrenal glands are controlled via the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. There is an existing negative feedback loop that governs the amount of adrenal hormones secreted under normal circumstances. The inner or medulla modulates the sympathetic nervous system through secretion and regulation of two hormones called epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) that are responsible for the fight or flight response.

 

The outer cortex manufactures the steroid hormones cortisone, hydrocortisone, testosterone, estrogen, 17-hydroxy-ketosteroids, DHEA and DHEA sulfate, cholesterol, pregnenolone, aldosterone, androstenedione, progesterone and a variety of intermediary hormones. The adrenals are the major steroid factories of the body.

 

In addition to helping you handle stress, these two primary adrenal hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, along with others similarly produced, help control body fluid balance, blood pressure, blood sugar, and other central metabolic functions.

 

Adrenaline

Adrenaline (epinephrine) is the “fight-or-flight” stress hormone. Epinephrine is a neurotransmitter secreted by the adrenal gland that is associated with sympathetic nervous system activity. It prolongs and intensifies the following effects of the sympathetic nervous system.

  • Causes the pupils of the eyes to dilate
  • Increases the heart rate, force of contraction, and blood pressure
  • Constricts the blood vessels of nonessential organs such as the skin
  • Dilates blood vessels to increase blood flow to organs involved in exercise or fighting off danger, skeletal muscles, cardiac muscle, liver, and adipose tissue
  • Increases the rate and depth of breathing and dilates the bronchioles to allow faster movement of air in and out of the lungs
  • Raises blood sugar as the liver glycogen is converted to glucose
  • Slows down or even stops processes that are not essential for meeting the stress situation, such as muscular movements of the gastrointestinal tract and digestive secretions

Cortisol

Cortisone and hydrocortisone are the major “glucocorticoids.” They help regulate the level of glucose in the body through a process known as “gluconeogenesis.

Cortisol, your long term stress hormone is made in the exterior portion of the gland, called the adrenal cortex. Cortisol, commonly called hydrocortisone, is the most abundant — and one of the most important — of many adrenal cortex hormones.

  • Stimulates the liver to convert amino acids to glucose, the primary fuel for energy production.
  • Stimulates increased glycogen in the liver. Glycogen is the stored form of glucose.
  • Mobilizes and increases fatty acids in the blood (from fat cells) to be used as fuel for energy production.
  • Counteracts inflammation and allergies.
  • Prevents the loss of sodium in urine and thus helps maintain blood volume and blood pressure.
  • Maintains resistance to stress (e.g., infections, physical trauma, temperature extremes, emotional trauma, etc.).
  • Maintains mood and emotional stability.
  • Excess Cortisol

Effects of elevated cortisol

  • Stimulates fat deposits and can result in weight gain.
  • Increased fat accumulation around waist.
  • Increases blood pressure.
  • Increases protein breakdown that can lead to muscle loss.
  • Causes demineralization of bone that can lead to osteoporosis.
  • Interferes with skin’s ability to regeneration and heal.
  • Causes demineralization of bone that can lead to osteoporosis.
  • Interferes with skin’s ability to regeneration and heal.
  • Cortisol is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent.
  • Suppresses the immune system.
  • Immune shutdown: yeast, viral, and bacterial infections.
  • Poor memory: Brain (hippocampus) atrophy
  • Estrogen dominance, leading to PMS, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer.
  • Increases blood sugar, which leads to reduced insulin sensitivity and diabetes

Symptoms of elevated cortisol

  • Fatigue/ decreased energy
  • Impaired memory
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Crying
  • Impaired concentration
  • Restlessness
  • Feelings of Hopelessness

DHEA

  • Is a precursor for testosterone and estrogen.
  • Reverses immune suppression caused by excess cortisol levels. thereby improving resistance against viruses,  bacteria and Candida albicans, parasites, allergies, and cancer.
  • Stimulates bone deposition and remodeling to prevent osteoporosis.
  • Improves cardiovascular status by lowering total cholesterol and LDL levels, thereby lessening incidences of heart attack.
  • Increases muscle mass. Decreases percentage of body fat.
  • Involved in the thyroid gland’s conversion of the less active T4 to the more active T3.
  • Reverses many of the unfavorable effects of excess cortisol, creating subsequent improvement in energy/ vitality, sleep, premenstrual symptoms, and mental clarity.
  • Accelerates recovery from any kind of acute stress (e.g., insufficient sleep, excessive exercise, mental strain, etc.).

Pregnenolone

Leads to the production of progesterone and as one of the intermediary steps in the making of cortisol. Pregnenolone is therefore one of the  most important intermediate hormones being produced in the hormonal cascade. Prolonged deficiencies in pregnenolone will lead to reduction of both glucocorticosteroids and mineralcorticoids such as cortisol and aldosterone respectively.

 

Causes Of Adrenal Fatigue

Stress, Stress, and more Stress!

 

The most common causes of stress are work pressure, death of a love one, moving, changing jobs, physical illness and marital problems.

 

Other Adrenal Stressors:

  • Anger
  • Fear
  • Worry/anxiety
  • Depression
  • Guilt
  • Overwork/ physical or mental strain
  • Excessive exercise
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Light-cycle disruption
  • Going to sleep late
  • Surgery
  • Trauma/injury
  • Chronic inflammation
  • Chronic infection
  •  Chronic pain
  • Temperature extremes
  • Toxic exposure
  • Malabsorption
  •  Maldigestion
  • Chronic illness
  • Chronic-severe allergies
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Nutritional deficiencies

Stages of Adrenal Fatigue

The famous researcher Hans Selye described the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS) in 1936. It involves three stages. In the first stage, the alarm reaction, a new situation is met with anxiety and surprise. A person intermittently secretes slightly higher levels of the adrenalin, the fight or flight hormone, in response to a slightly higher level of stress. The adrenal cortex is stimulated to produce additional cortisol and related hormones.

 

The second stage, called adaptation or resistance begins when the stress is constant enough, to cause sustained excessive levels of certain adrenal hormones. This is the body’s response to long term protection. It secretes further hormones that increase blood sugar levels to sustain energy and raise blood pressure. The adrenal cortex (outer covering) produces hormones called corticosteroids for this resistance reaction.

 

The third phase is called exhaustion, wherein the body’s ability to cope with the stress is now depleted. At this point, adrenal hormones drop from excessively high to excessively low and the body experiences adrenal exhaustion. Mental, physical and emotional resources suffer heavily. The body experiences “adrenal exhaustion”. The blood sugar levels decrease as the adrenals become depleted, leading to decreased stress tolerance, progressive mental and physical exhaustion, illness and collapse.

 

Disruptions in the body’s stress center–the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis–act as crucial triggers in the initial onset and progression of depression. HPA under activity is linked to atypical depression fatigue, lethargy, indifference.  Over activity of the body’s stress system is associated with anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, and loss of libido. A hyperactive Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis, results in significantly higher morning and midnight salivary cortisol levels which contributes to anxiety and mood symptoms by interfering with serotonin activity. This also leads to an impairment in the thyroid gland, which can cause a further decline in energy level and mood and is one of the reasons why many people have thyroid glands that don’t work well.

 

Adrenal Fatigue Test

In order to determine the health of your adrenal glands you need to have a  blood, urine, or saliva test performed by a practitioner trained to treat adrenal fatigue. Most doctors are unfamiliar with this condition for the simple reason that it is difficult to diagnose effectively by traditional blood test. Conventional labs set the ranges to detect adrenal failure (Addison’s Disease).

 

Cortisol levels may be checked throughout the day by a saliva test to determine if they are highest in the morning and lowest in the evening. Saliva testing is preferred as it measures the amount of free and circulating hormones instead of the binded hormone commonly measured in blood test. DHEA, Epinephrine, and norepinephrine are some other indicators of adrenal function. The information provided by testing can help to determine the most appropriate type of treatment.

 

Self Screening Tests for Adrenal Dysfunction

Ragland’s sign (blood pressure test) — (Equipment required: Home blood pressure kit) Take your blood pressure while sitting down. Then, stand up and immediately take your blood pressure again. Your systolic (first) number should have raised 8 to 10 mm. If it dropped, you probably have adrenal fatigue.

 

Pupil dilation exam — (Equipment required: Flashlight and a mirror) Look into the mirror and shine the flashlight into the pupil of one eye. It should contract. If after 30 seconds, it stays the same or, even worse, dilates, you most likely have adrenal fatigue.

 

Pain when pressing on adrenal glands (located over kidneys)

 

Adrenal Fatigue Symptoms

  • Low body temperature
  • Weakness
  • Unexplained hair loss
  • Nervousness
  • Difficulty building muscle
  • Irritability
  • Mental depression
  • Difficulty gaining weight
  • Apprehension
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Excessive hunger
  • Tendency towards inflammation
  • Moments of confusion
  • Indigestion
  • Feelings of frustration
  • Poor memory
  • Alternating diarrhea and constipation
  • Osteoporosis
  • Lack of energy
  • Auto-immune diseases
  • Lightheadedness
  • Palpitations [heart fluttering
  • Dizziness that occurs upon standing
  • Poor resistance to infections
  • Low blood pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Food and/or inhalant allergies
  • PMS
  • Craving for sweets
  • Dry and thin skin
  • Headaches
  • Scanty perspiration
  • Alcohol intolerance

Treatment for Adrenal Fatigue

Adrenal Fatigue treatment requires diet and lifestyle changes. It may take 6 month to 2 years for the adrenal fatigue to resolve.

 

Adrenal Fatigue Supplements

Supplements for adrenal fatigue play an important role in nourishing and strengthening your adrenal gland. The will allow the adrenal gland to be restored to a more healthy level of functioning which could not occur without them. It can consist of herbs, vitamins, minerals, and essential fatty acids.

 

**Because of the similarities in low and high cortisol symptoms it is highly advisable to obtain a saliva cortisol test before beginning any treatment plan. If you are suffering from excessive amounts of cortisol and take adrenal cortical extracts or other supplements to raise an already elevated cortisol level your symptoms will become worse.

 

 

Find out more about the Adrenal Stress Test that is available!

Lifestyle changes such as:

Reduce Stress.  Family, job, financial, and marital stress are factors that must be reduced or eliminated when possible. Sometimes seeing a mental health counselor to develop coping skills to deal with life’s stressors can be helpful.

Eat steadily, all day long. Skipping meals is one of the worst things you can do for your body. When you’re hungry, your blood sugar drops, stressing your adrenal glands and triggering your sympathetic nervous system. That causes light-headedness, cravings, anxiety and fatigue.

 

Skipping breakfast is particularly bad, as it is a sure fire way to gain, not lose, weight. If you start each morning with a good breakfast and “graze” healthfully every two to four hours, your blood sugar won’t take any sharp dips. You’ll feel more rested and energetic. Another drawback to skipping meals: The resulting low blood sugar can slow the speed at which you process.

 

Exercise to relax. Walking, YOGA, deep breathing, and stretching are great stress reducers.  Vigorous or aerobic exercise can deplete the adrenals. If your symptoms are severe wait until you feel a little stronger to do these.

Get 8 hours sleep or more. During sleep your adrenal glands are restored and repaired. Unfortunately, most of us place little value on sleep, and end up getting less than we need, night after night. Result: Your adrenal glands stay depleted.

 

Foods to Avoid in Adrenal Fatigue

  • Eat protein with every meal. Eat Complex carbohydrates such as brown rice. Avoid sugar, junk food, white pasta, white rice, white bread.
  • Alcoholic beverages in excess reduce the functioning of the immune and energy production systems
  • Artificial sweeteners (Stevia is okay)

    Foods high in potassium make adrenal fatigue worse (bananas, all melons, dried figs, raisins, dates, oranges, grapefruit, etc.)

  • Chemicals, additives and preservatives such as sodium nitrate, MSG

    Oysters, clams, lobster, deep-sea fish such as tuna, mackerel, and swordfish that may contain toxic levels of mercury.

  • Absolutely NO Caffeine
  • Coffee/Sodas over stimulates your adrenals. They deplete important B vitamins and alter your pH levels. Coffee does not give you energy; coffee gives you the illusion of energy. Coffee actually drains the body of energy and makes you more tired, because of vitamin and adrenal depletion.
  • Sweetened fruit juices

The following have been shown to relieve Adrenal Fatigue symptoms:

  • Sleeping until 9 a.m. as often as possible
  • Laughing
  • Exercising
  • Minimizing stress
  • Taking negative people out of your life
  • Eating regular meals
  • Chewing well
  • Doing something fun each day
  • Combining unrefined carbohydrates with protein and oils
  • Avoiding junk food, white potatoes, white bread, white flour, white rice, and refined sugar
  • Eating five to six servings of vegetables each day
  • Taking calcium and magnesium supplements
  • Adding sea salt to your diet (May add ½ tsp sea salt to 8 oz water in the morning)

by:http://www.integrativepsychiatry.net

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By Dr. Mercola – http://articles.mercola.com

In the early 1990’s, soy and soy products exploded onto the supermarket scene with promises of bountiful health benefits.

This “new miracle food,” soy, was supposed to lower cholesterol, take the heat out of hot flashes, protect against breast and prostate cancer and offer a filling alternative to earth-loving vegetarians.

The problem with these claims?

Most of them are false.

Sadly, most of what you have been led to believe by the media about soy is simply untrue.

The sudden upsurge in the recommendation of soy as a health food has been nothing more than a clever marketing gimmick to further reduce the cost and nutritional content of your food.

For you vegetarians out there staring at the screen in open-mouthed shock, fear not.

There are plenty of other healthy vegetarian alternatives, which I will discuss later in this article.

What was once considered a minor industrial crop back in 1913 now covers over 72 million acres of farmland.

But first, let’s examine the dangers and side effects of soy protein isolate and GMO foods.

Soy Protein Isolate — What is It, and How is it Getting in My Food?

The Soyfoods Association of America has a soy protein “fact sheet” defining soy protein isolate as the following:

“Soy protein isolate is a dry powder food ingredient that has been separated or isolated from the other components of the soybean, making it 90 to 95 percent protein and nearly carbohydrate and fat-free.”

Soy protein isolate can be found in protein bars, meal replacement shakes, bottled fruit drinks, soups and sauces, meat analogs, baked goods, breakfast cereals and some dietary supplements.

Bodybuilders beware: because many weight gainer powders, bars and shakes contain this dangerous ingredient and it can cause troubling side effects such as diminished libido and erectile dysfunction — and this is just the start. You’ll find out more about these disturbing health effects later on in this article.

Even if you are not a vegetarian and do not use soymilk or tofu, it is important to become a label reader. There are so many different names for soy additives, you could be bringing home a genetically modified soy-based product without even realizing it. Dr. Daniel offers a free Special Report, “Where the Soys Are,” on her Web site. It lists the many “aliases” that soy might be hiding under in ingredient lists — words like “boullion,” “natural flavor” and “textured plant protein.”

Here are a few other names soy tends to hide under:

  • Mono-diglyceride
  • Soya, Soja or Yuba
  • TSF (textured soy flour) or TSP (textured soy protein)
  • TVP (textured vegetable protein)
  • Lecithin
  • MSG (monosodium glutamate)

Not all textured vegetable protein is made from soy, but a great deal of it is. Lecithin can be made from soy, eggs, sunflower or corn. Be sure to contact the manufacturer to find out which is in your product if the label doesn’t reveal this information.

GMO — Making Soy Even Worse

One of the worst problems with soy comes from the fact that 90 to 95 percent of soybeans grown in the US are genetically modified (GM), and these are used to create soy protein isolate.

Why the genetic tinkering?

Genetically modified soybeans are designed to be “Roundup ready.” That’s right, they are chemically engineered to withstand heavy doses of herbicides without killing the plant! What does this mean for your health and the health of your unborn or yet-to-be-conceived children? Read on.

GM Soy Can Lead to Hormonal Disruption and Miscarriages

The active ingredient in Roundup herbicide is called glyphosate, which is responsible for the disruption of the delicate hormonal balance of the female reproductive cycle.

“It’s an endocrine buster,” says UK pathologist Stanley Ewen, “that interferes with aromatase, which produces estrogen.”

What’s more, glyphosate is toxic to the placenta, which is responsible for delivering vital nutrients from mother to child, and eliminating waste products. Once the placenta has been damaged or destroyed, the result can be miscarriage. In those children born to mothers who have been exposed to even a small amount of glyphosate, serious birth defects can result.

In an excellent summary of glyphosate-related effects by the Pesticide Action Network, Dr. Andreas Carrasco of the Embryology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine in Buenos Aires, simply and expertly explains the serious risks for unborn children exposed to Roundup-laden GMO soy products.

Amphibian embryos were exposed to a tiny concentration of glyphosate (diluted 5000 fold) and showed the following effects:

“Effects included reduced head size, genetic alterations in the central nervous system, increased death of cells that help form the skull, deformed cartilage, eye defects, and undeveloped kidneys. Carrasco also stated that the glyphosate was not breaking down in the cells, but was accumulating.

The findings lend weight to claims that abnormally high levels of cancer, birth defects, neonatal mortality, lupus, kidney disease, and skin and respiratory problems in populations near Argentina’s soybean fields may be linked to the aerial spraying of Roundup.”

The long-term effects of the human consumption of genetically modified soy and soy-based products are staggering.

In April 2010, researchers at Russia’s Institute of Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the National Association for Gene Security found that after feeding hamsters GM soy for two years over three generations, by the third generation, most lost the ability to have babies!  Now, let’s take a close look at some of the health risks to YOU as a result of eating genetically modified soy.

Infertility in Women

Do you want to start a family? Have you had any trouble conceiving, perhaps due to irregular menstrual cycles or endometriosis? Have you ever experienced a miscarriage?

If so, what you’re about to read will shock you.

Brazilian study published in 2009 looked at the impact of soy on the reproductive system of female rats. Female rats fed GM soy for 15 months showed significant changes in their uterus and reproductive cycles, compared to rats fed organic soy or no soy.

Extrapolating the findings to people, women who eat genetically modified soy products, such as the soy protein isolate in processed vegetarian fare, may be more likely to experience severe hormonal disruptions, including an overabundance of estrogen, a hair-growth stimulating hormone, and damage to the pituitary gland.

According to Dr. Stanley Ewen, the female rats fed GM soy probably had an increase in progesterone, which could cause an increase in the number of eggs released during each ovulation cycle.

You might think this would lead to an increase in fertility. However, as discussed in an article by Jeffrey Smith, women who consume genetically modified soy products are at increased risk for developing retrograde menstruation (the menstrual cycle backs up into the body instead of outward), causing endometriosis, which can lead to infertility.

The consumption of soy protein isolate and other soy-based products can also lead to abnormally heavy or longer menstrual periods. This is called menorrhagia and, ironically, some commercials have been popping up with a new pill that supposedly offers the “cure” for this “mystery syndrome.”

When in reality the real cure for some women is as simple as removing soy and soy-based products from the diet. The negative effects of soy are not restricted to women, however.

Loss of Libido & Erectile Dysfunction in Men

Guys, do you enjoy protein bars or use a weight gainer shake? If so, be sure to read the label to see if the products you use contain any soy ingredients. Did you know that celibate monks living in monasteries and leading a vegetarian lifestyle find soy foods quite helpful for dampening libido?

Another drawback: Soy has also been linked to erectile dysfunction. The two natural drugs found in soy, genistein and daidzein, mimic estrogen so well that they have been known to cause a variety of alarming side effects in men:

  • Breast enlargement (gynecomastia)
  • Decreased facial and body hair growth
  • Decreased libido
  • Mood swings and frequent crying jags
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Lowered sperm count

For example, one recent study documented a case of gynecomastia in a 60-year-old man as a result of his soy consumption. Another study showed that juvenile rats exposed to daidzein showed impaired erectile function at maturity.

Men, if you’ve experienced one or any of these symptoms, soy could be the culprit. Remove it from your diet, but be sure to consult a trusted physician if your symptoms do not improve or get worse as this could be a sign of another serious condition.

The Healthy Aspects of Soy: Fermented vs. Unfermented

In order to back up the claim that soy is a health food, privately funded “researchers” have been quick to point out that Asians, who consume a diet high in soy, have less risk of breast, uterine and prostate cancer. Unfortunately, they leave out two very important
points:

The reason Asians have an increased risk for some cancers is the same reason they do not develop others: unfermented soy. The soy marketing and promotion gurus left out this critical piece of information. Would you rather have one cancer over another? Isn’t that like asking whether or not you’d like to be whacked in the head with a two-by-four vs. a wooden stick?

You might be asking yourself what the big difference is between consuming a fermented soy product such as, say, tempeh, vs. tofu or a veggie burger. I’m here to tell you, the difference is night and day.

Unfermented AND fermented soy contains hormonal mimics in the form of isoflavones which can not only disrupt delicate hormone systems in your body, but also act as goitrogens, substances that suppress your thyroid function. When the thyroid is suppressed, a host of health problems result, namely:

  • Anxiety and mood swings
  • Insomnia
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Difficulty conceiving children
  • Digestive problems
  • Food allergies

And so much more. No wonder soy can lead to thyroid, esophagus and stomach cancer! Unfermented soy is also chock full of phytic acid, an “antinutrient” responsible for leeching vital nutrients from your body. Phytic acid also blocks the uptake of essential minerals such as calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and zinc especially.

Now, fermented soy products do provide health benefits.

As I mentioned in my previous article, some examples of healthful fermented soyproducts are as follows:

  • Tempeh, a fermented soybean cake with a firm texture and nutty, mushroom-like flavor.
  • Miso, a fermented soybean paste with a salty, buttery texture (commonly used in miso soup).
  • Natto, fermented soybeans with a sticky texture and strong, cheese-like flavor.
  • Soy sauce, which is traditionally made by fermenting soybeans, salt and enzymes; be wary because many varieties on the market today are made artificially using a chemical process.

For those of you who enjoy tofu, I’m sorry to say it didn’t make this list because tofu is an unfermented soy product.

So, What Are The Health Benefits of Fermented Soy Products?

The claim that soy products can prevent osteoporosis, decrease your risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia and protect you from cancer of the prostate, lung and liver is actually true, but ONLY if the soy is fermented.

How?

The process of fermenting soy destroys the above-mentioned dangerous substances, thereby making it fit for consumption. Also, fermented soy products such as those listed above are a rich source of vitamin K2, a vitamin that works in harmony with vitamin D to keep you healthy. Vitamin K regulates your body’s blood clotting ability and helps prevent cancer, osteoporosis and heart disease. Andvitamin D is essential to the function of every system in your body.

Warning to Vegetarians about the Risk of Mineral Deficiency

Since phytic acid or phytates sap the nutrients from your body, if you’re eating a vegetarian diet that has replaced meat with mostly unfermented soy such as veggie burgers containing GMO soy protein isolate, you are at risk for severe mineral deficiency.

In addition to this nutrient loss, many processed veggie burgers and the like are packed with harmful artificial flavorings, particularly MSG and textured vegetable protein products to give them their strong “meat” flavor.

What’s even worse is the process soy has to go through to become soy protein isolate. Acid washing in aluminum tanks, which is designed to remove some of the antinutrients (but the results often vary widely), leeches aluminum into the final product. Aluminum can have adverse effects on brain development and cause symptoms such as:

  • Antisocial behavior
  • Learning disabilities
  • Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

As I mentioned in a previous article about soy, this makes processed vegetarian fare more palatable, but far from nutritious. Vegetarians have plenty of options for well-rounded, nutritious meals without needing to eat soy or soy-based products.

  • Beans are an inexpensive, protein-rich food that can be eaten alone, added to salads or served as a side dish. Be sure to purchase organic dried beans and cook them at home to avoid the adverse health effects of eating canned food. Ideally is it also best to soak them for at least 12 hours before cooking them.
  • Nuts are also an excellent source of protein. For optimal health benefits, reach for organic nuts such as almonds or walnuts, instead of overly processed mixed nuts.
  • Quinoa is a gluten free grain that can be enjoyed as a cereal, side dish or added to homemade vegetable stews as a thickener.
  • Flaxseed, which is rich in essential omega 3 fats like ALA, is an excellent source of protein. Add it to salads or sprinkle it over yogurt to infuse your meal with vital nutrients. However, it is important to grind flax seeds just prior to eating them because100 percent of commercially ground flaxseeds are rancid. Hemp seeds are also an excellent source of protein.

Hope for the Lactose Intolerant

If you suffer from lactose intolerance and have been replacing milk with soy, you have three more healthful options: Almond milk, and now hemp milk. All are nutritious alternatives to soy, and almond milk has a richer, heartier flavor. Hemp milk is a very creamy, high protein alternative to soymilk, and it’s easy to blend your own by whizzing up hemp seeds and water in a high-speed blender.

Babies — Birth Control in a Bottle

As stated in a number of previous articles, soy formula is one of the most dangerous foods you can feed your baby!

“In 1998, investigators reported that the daily exposure of infants to isoflavones in soy infant formula is 6 to11 times higher on a body-weight basis than the dose that has hormonal effects in adults consuming soy foods. Circulating concentrations of isoflavones in infants fed soy-based formula were 13,000 to 22,000 times higher than plasma estradiol concentrations in infants on cow’s milk formula.”

What does this mean? Feeding your infant soy-based formula can cause a host of health problems including:

  • Behavioral problems
  • Food allergies and digestive distress
  • Early puberty and fertility problems (including the inability to menstruate)
  • Asthma
  • Precocious puberty for girls and gynecomastia (man boobs) for boys
  • Thyroid disease
  • Cancer

As I concluded in my article on infant formula, babies who are fed exclusively from the breast from birth to six months enjoy health benefits such as:

  • Lower risk of respiratory tract and middle ear infections
  • Lower risk of eczema
  • Lower risk of obesity
  • Added protection against heart disease, diabetes, asthma, and allergies
  • Improved brain function and immune system function

Soy formula is also laden with toxic chemicals such as aluminum and manganese, which can cause both physical and mental health problems, learning disabilities, brain damage and behavioral problems. If, for some reason, you are unable to breastfeed or have adopted a baby, look into these recipes for homemade infant formula.

School Lunch — Children’s Nutrition Left Behind

In order to comply with new US Government standards, soy products are now being used to replace whole, nutritious foods in school lunches. Due to the decreased fat content of soy, it is touted as a healthful alternative to the meat and dairy of yesterday’s hot meal.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Soy added to your child’s hot lunch depletes the necessary nutrients needed for healthy growth and has been linked to learning disabilities. I encourage you to watch this sobering video to learn more about the dangers in your child’s school lunch. Do your children a favor and send them to school with a healthy, home-packed meal.

Senior Citizens — Aging Less Gracefully

According to a study done by Dr. Lon White of the Hawaii Center for Health Research, senior citizens who consumed a lot of tofu in mid-life were more likely to experience accelerated brain aging and a more pronounced loss of cognitive function.

“What’s more,” said Dr White, “those who ate a lot of tofu, by the time they were 75 or 80, looked five years older.”

If you’re heading toward your golden years and are looking to avoid soy protein, become a label reader. Meal replacement drinks like Ensure are filled with soy protein and are best avoided. As you can see, unfermented soy is anything but a health food.

Do your own research, try eliminating it from your family’s diet and judge the results for yourself. Remember, an educated consumer is an armed consumer. Big companies can only produce and sell these harmful products as long as you’re buying them.

Vote with your wallet by spending your money on healthier alternatives!

7 Foods You Should Never Eat

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Food scientists are shedding light on items loaded with toxins and chemicals–and simple swaps for a cleaner diet and supersized health.

Clean eating means choosing fruits, vegetables, and meats that are raised, grown, and sold with minimal processing. Often they’re organic, and rarely (if ever) should they contain additives. But in some cases, the methods of today’s food producers are neither clean nor sustainable. The result is damage to our health, the environment, or both. So we decided to take a fresh look at food through the eyes of the people who spend their lives uncovering what’s safe–or not–to eat. We asked them a simple question: “What foods do you avoid?” Their answers don’t necessarily make up a “banned foods” list. But reaching for the suggested alternatives might bring you better health–and peace of mind.

1. The Endocrinologist Won’t Eat: Canned Tomatoes
Fredrick Vom Saal, is an endocrinologist at the University of Missouri who studies bisphenol-A.

The problem: The resin linings of tin cans contain bisphenol-A, a synthetic estrogen that has been linked to ailments ranging from reproductive problems to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Unfortunately, acidity (a prominent characteristic of tomatoes) causes BPA to leach into your food. Studies show that the BPA in most people’s body exceeds the amount that suppresses sperm production or causes chromosomal damage to the eggs of animals. “You can get 50 mcg of BPA per liter out of a tomato can, and that’s a level that is going to impact people, particularly the young,” says vom Saal. “I won’t go near canned tomatoes.”

The solution: Choose tomatoes in glass bottles (which do not need resin linings), such as the brands Bionaturae and Coluccio. You can also get several types in Tetra Pak boxes, like Trader Joe’s and Pomi.

Budget tip: If your recipe allows, substitute bottled pasta sauce for canned tomatoes. Look for pasta sauces with low sodium and few added ingredients, or you may have to adjust the recipe.

Pile Your Plate with These 25 Nutrition Superstars

2. The Farmer Won’t Eat: Corn-Fed Beef
Joel Salatin is co-owner of Polyface Farms and author of half a dozen books on sustainable farming.

The problem: Cattle evolved to eat grass, not grains. But farmers today feed their animals corn and soybeans, which fatten up the animals faster for slaughter. But more money for cattle farmers (and lower prices at the grocery store) means a lot less nutrition for us. A recent comprehensive study conducted by the USDA and researchers from Clemson University found that compared with corn-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium; lower in inflammatory omega-6s; and lower in saturated fats that have been linked to heart disease. “We need to respect the fact that cows are herbivores, and that does not mean feeding them corn and chicken manure,” says Salatin.

The solution: Buy grass-fed beef, which can be found at specialty grocers, farmers’ markets, and nationally at Whole Foods. It’s usually labeled because it demands a premium, but if you don’t see it, ask your butcher.

Budget tip: Cuts on the bone are cheaper because processors charge extra for deboning. You can also buy direct from a local farmer, which can be as cheap as $5 per pound. To find a farmer near you, search eatwild.com.

20 Ways to Save At The Supermarket

3. The Toxicologist Won’t Eat: Microwave Popcorn
Olga Naidenko, is a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group.

The problem: 
Chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the bag, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans, according to a recent study from UCLA. In animal testing, the chemicals cause liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to vaporize–and migrate into your popcorn. “They stay in your body for years and accumulate there,” says Naidenko, which is why researchers worry that levels in humans could approach the amounts causing cancers in laboratory animals. DuPont and other manufacturers have promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.

The solution: Pop natural kernels the old-fashioned way: in a skillet. For flavorings, you can add real butter or dried seasonings, such as dillweed, vegetable flakes, or soup mix.

Budget tip: Popping your own popcorn is dirt cheap

Top 10 Food Mistakes Your Making

4. The Farm Director Won’t Eat: Nonorganic Potatoes
Jeffrey Moyer is the chair of the National Organic Standards Board.

The problem:
 Root vegetables absorb herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides that wind up in soil. In the case of potatoes–the nation’s most popular vegetable–they’re treated with fungicides during the growing season, then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they’re dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting. “Try this experiment: Buy a conventional potato in a store, and try to get it to sprout. It won’t,” says Moyer, who is also farm director of the Rodale Institute (also owned by Rodale Inc., the publisher of Prevention). “I’ve talked with potato growers who say point-blank they would never eat the potatoes they sell. They have separate plots where they grow potatoes for themselves without all the chemicals.”

The solution: 
Buy organic potatoes. Washing isn’t good enough if you’re trying to remove chemicals that have been absorbed into the flesh.

Budget tip: Organic potatoes are only $1 to $2 a pound, slightly more expensive than conventional spuds.

What to Really Look for on a Nutrition Label

5. The Fisheries Expert Won’t Eat: Farmed Salmon
Dr. David Carpenter, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany, published a major study in the journal Science on contamination in fish.

The problem: Nature didn’t intend for salmon to be crammed into pens and fed soy, poultry litter, and hydrolyzed chicken feathers. As a result, farmed salmon is lower in vitamin D and higher in contaminants, including carcinogens, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, and pesticides such as dioxin and DDT. According to Carpenter, the most contaminated fish come from Northern Europe, which can be found on American menus. “You could eat one of these salmon dinners every 5 months without increasing your risk of cancer,” says Carpenter, whose 2004 fish contamination study got broad media attention. “It’s that bad.” Preliminary science has also linked DDT to diabetes and obesity, but some nutritionists believe the benefits of omega-3s outweigh the risks. There is also concern about the high level of antibiotics and pesticides used to treat these fish. When you eat farmed salmon, you get dosed with the same drugs and chemicals.

The solution: Switch to wild-caught Alaska salmon. If the package says fresh Atlantic, it’s farmed. There are no commercial fisheries left for wild Atlantic salmon.

Budget tip: 
Canned salmon, almost exclusively from wild catch, can be found for as little as $3 a can.

6. The Cancer Researcher Won’t Drink: Milk Produced With Artificial Hormones
Rick North is project director of the Campaign for Safe Food at the Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and former CEO of the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society.

The problem:
 Milk producers treat their dairy cattle with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH or rBST, as it is also known) to boost milk production. But rBGH also increases udder infections and even pus in the milk. It also leads to higher levels of a hormone called insulin-like growth factor in milk. In people, high levels of IGF-1 may contribute to breast, prostate, and colon cancers. “When the government approved rBGH, it was thought that IGF-1 from milk would be broken down in the human digestive tract,” says North. As it turns out, the casein in milk protects most of it, according to several independent studies. “There’s not 100 percent proof that this is increasing cancer in humans,” admits North. “However, it’s banned in most industrialized countries.”

The solution: Check labels for rBGH-free, rBST-free, produced without artificial hormones, or organic milk. These phrases indicate rBGH-free products.

Budget tip: Try Wal-Mart’s Great Value label, which does not use rBGH.

7. The Organic-Foods Expert Won’t Eat: Conventional Apples
Mark Kastel, a former executive for agribusiness, is codirector of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods.

The problem: If fall fruits held a “most doused in pesticides contest,” apples would win. Why? They are individually grafted (descended from a single tree) so that each variety maintains its distinctive flavor. As such, apples don’t develop resistance to pests and are sprayed frequently. The industry maintains that these residues are not harmful. But Kastel counters that it’s just common sense to minimize exposure by avoiding the most doused produce, like apples. “Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers,” he says. And increasing numbers of studies are starting to link a higher body burden of pesticides (from all sources) with Parkinson’s disease.

The solution: Buy organic apples.

Budget tip: If you can’t afford organic, be sure to wash and peel them. But Kastel personally refuses to compromise. “I would rather see the trade-off being that I don’t buy that expensive electronic gadget,” he says. “Just a few of these decisions will accommodate an organic diet for a family.”
via Fox News
Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/12/01/7-foods-should-never-eat/#ixzz1fm5VXxSp

Food Cravings? Here Is What Your Body Really Wants

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If you crave this…What you really need is…And here are healthy foods that have it:

  • Chocolate = Magnesium: Raw nuts and seeds, legumes, fruits
  • Sweets = Chromium: Broccoli, grapes, cheese, dried beans, calves liver, chicken Carbon Fresh fruits Phosphorus Chicken, beef, liver, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, legumes, grains Sulfur Cranberries, horseradish, cruciferous vegetables, kale, cabbage Tryptophan Cheese, liver, lamb, raisins, sweet potato, spinach
  • Bread, toast = Nitrogen: High protein foods: fish, meat, nuts, beans
  • Oily snacks, fatty foods = Calcium:   Mustard and turnip greens, broccoli, kale, legumes, cheese, sesame
  • Coffee or tea = Phosphorous: Chicken, beef, liver, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, legumes Sulfur Egg yolks, red peppers, muscle protein, garlic, onion, cruciferous vegetables NaCl (salt) Sea salt, apple cider vinegar (on salad) Iron Meat, fish and poultry, seaweed, greens, black cherries
  • Alcohol, recreational drugs = Protein:  Meat, poultry, seafood, dairy, nuts Avenin Granola, oatmeal Calcium Mustard and turnip greens, broccoli, kale, legumes, cheese, sesame Glutamine Supplement glutamine powder for withdrawal, raw cabbage juice Potassium Sun-dried black olives, potato peel broth, seaweed, bitter greens
  • Chewing ice = Iron:  Meat, fish, poultry, seaweed, greens, black cherries
  • Burned food = Carbon: Fresh fruits
  • Soda and other carbonated drinks = Calcium:   Mustard and turnip greens, broccoli, kale, legumes, cheese, sesame
  • Salty foods = Chloride:  Raw goat milk, fish, unrefined sea salt
  • Acid foods = Magnesium: Raw nuts and seeds, legumes, fruits
  • Preference for liquids rather than solids = Water:  Flavor water with lemon or lime. You need 8 to 10 glasses per day.
  • Preference for solids rather than liquids = Water: You have been so dehydrated for so long that you have lost your thirst. Flavor water with lemon or lime. You need 8 to 10 glasses per day.
  • Cool drinks = Manganese: Walnuts, almonds, pecans, pineapple, blueberries
  • Pre-menstrual cravings = Zinc:   Red meats (especially organ meats), seafood, leafy vegetables, root vegetables
  • General overeating = Silicon:   Nuts, seeds; avoid refined starches Tryptophan Cheese, liver, lamb, raisins, sweet potato, spinach Tyrosine Vitamin C supplements or orange, green, red fruits and vegetables
  • Lack of appetite = Vitamin B1:  Nuts, seeds, beans, liver and other organ meats. Vitamin B3:Tuna, halibut, beef, chicken, turkey, pork, seeds and legumes Manganese Walnuts,       almonds, pecans, pineapple, blueberries Chloride Raw goat milk, unrefined sea salt
  • Tobacco = Silicon:   Nuts, seeds; avoid refined starches Tyrosine Vitamin C supplements or orange, green and red fruits and vegetables

Via naturopathyworks.com

The importance of Vitamin D and How BTP can Test and Optimize your levels now

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Much has been said about the importance of Vitamin D in recent years.  It is essential that you supplement with vitamin D, if you want to reap all its benefits, which include better bone building, fewer colds and flus, higher testosterone levels, more strength, better mood and brain function, and even greater fat loss.

 

D Background

There are two forms of vitamin D: D-3 (cholecalciferol) and D-2 (ergocalciferol). Vitamin D-2 is found in plant sources and some supplements and can only enter the body through the diet. As mentioned above, sunshine triggers vitamin D production in the skin by converting cholesterol into vitamin D-3. That form can also be acquired through the consumption of animal products like fatty fish or by supplementation. However, both those forms are inert and must be converted to the active form of the vitamin, a steroid hormone called 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, before the body can use it. That work is done by the liver and the kidneys, and because D-3 is more readily converted to the active form, it’s considered the more potent form of the vitamin. Any extra D that’s not immediately needed by the body is stored in fat tissue for future use.

Although in theory, the body should be able to make all the vitamin D it needs, in reality, it doesn’t even come close, regardless of how much sun time you get. Supplementing with vitamin D is, therefore, essential.

 

The D You Know

Some of vitamin D’s functions have been so well-publicized that you likely don’t need us to tell you about them. The most obvious is its role in promoting bone health. Vitamin D helps to maintain bone health by aiding calcium absorption and regulating the movement of calcium in and out of bone tissue. Without D, you would absorb less than half the calcium you do from food and supplements. (This is why dairy products are almost always fortified with D.) Vitamin D also bolsters the immune system, triggering the killer T cells that fight off germs like colds and flu before they can beat you down and force you to miss workouts.

Vitamin D also may help to protect from certain cancers. One study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine reported that women living in sunnier regions of the world had higher blood levels of vitamin D, as well as a significantly lower risk of ovarian cancer, than those in less sunny regions. Another study found that sun exposure and a diet rich in vitamin D lowered the risk of breast cancer. And sunshine exposure also has been correlated with a lower risk of colon cancer.

You may know that vitamin D boasts brain benefits. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders, as well as a greater cognitive decline with aging. One study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reported that vitamin D deficiency was associated with depression and diminishing cognitive performance. In fact, Georgia State University researchers reported that individuals with vitamin D deficiency have an 85 percent greater risk of developing depression.

 

The D You Don’t Know

In addition to the many health benefits covered above, vitamin D has several physique and performance benefits that are worth noting. Given that vitamin D gets converted into a steroid hormone in the body, it makes sense that it has effects on muscle fibers. The active form of D binds to specific receptors found on muscle cell membranes and in muscle cell nuclei. When it binds to these receptors, it enhances muscle contraction and protein synthesis — the buildup of muscle protein. Research shows that certain types of these receptors may be responsible for greater muscle size and strength. Although you can’t alter the type of vitamin D receptors you have in your muscles, making sure you have adequate levels of D in your body can help ensure your receptors are activated for optimal muscle function, strength and growth.

Another study reported that female students at the University of Southern California who had lower blood levels of vitamin D had significantly higher levels of fat in their muscles than those with high blood levels of vitamin D. (Yes, the body can store fat in muscles as well as under the skin.) Having fattier muscles not only means that you have more total body fat, but it also can result in weaker muscles with less endurance. Muscles with higher fat content have impaired mitochondrial function, so they produce less energy and can develop reduced insulin sensitivity.

Although researchers are not sure precisely how vitamin D prevents fat accumulation in muscle, it is well-known that vitamin D and calcium work together to encourage fat loss. One recent study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition reported that when men and women consumed a breakfast containing more than 500 milligrams of calcium and about 350 IU of vitamin D, they burned more calories and fat and ate 320 fewer calories throughout the day as compared to when they started the day with a breakfast containing about half as much calcium and D.

Because vitamin D is produced in the body from cholesterol, as is testosterone, it follows that higher vitamin D levels can encourage higher testosterone levels in men. In fact, Austrian scientists from the Medical University of Graz reported that men with higher blood levels of vitamin D had significantly higher levels of testosterone and lower levels of sex hormone-binding globulin than those with low levels of vitamin D in their blood. Having lower SHBG means that more of the testosterone produced is free to get into muscles and increase muscle growth. This group of researchers did a follow-up study on men to see whether vitamin D supplementation actually could raise testosterone levels. They reported in a recent issue of Hormone and Metabolic Research that the men receiving just more than 3,300 IU per day of vitamin D for one year had a 25 percent increase in testosterone levels, while those getting a placebo had no such rise.

 

Testing and Dosing D

At Boston Testosterone Partners, we test all our patient levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the storage form of vitamin D in the body, for deficiencies.  We will then prescribe a plan exactly matched to your deficiency.  With the purest, pharmaceutical grade Vitamin D injectables or pills available, Boston Testosterone Partners will optimize your specific D levels like no other medical clinic can.

Call today, 1-855-617-MEDS (6337)

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